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View Full Version : New Boardsmith Board Impressions



robenco15
11-02-2015, 09:50 PM
Hey All,

After owning a Boardsmith board for the past 16 months I had constant warping issues and it was a source of slight unhappiness. The warping was somewhat severe, but the board worked so I dealt with it. However, after seeing John had taken over the company I was curious if I'd be able to have to a dialogue with him about somehow replacing my warped board with a new one at some type of discount. Honestly, it was just a shot in the dark and I think I was half asleep when I sent him the email.

Anyway, I am incredibly happy to say John is an absolutely fantastic person to work with and we came to a wonderful understanding. I I recently received a new 18x24 Maple Board and it is amazing. I thought I would post some impressions and pictures of it for all to see.

Few things I noticed immediately was the angles of the edges were cut steeper (I think is the word I want) than my last board and the grain pattern is incredible. Each row or column follows a repeating pattern and really looks great. The blocks also may be slightly smaller than on my last board, but that is neither a pro or a con, just an observation.

I am noticing after using it a bunch that the surface is a bit rougher, but I think I am just so used to my older board that had a ton of wear on it that eventually this new one with take on the glassy smooth texture.

I also loaded it with mineral oil to darken up the maple and it is really amazing how nice it looks.

Anyway, Boardsmith is in great hands with John and I have been recommending his work to everyone I know ever since I first spoke with him. Enjoy the pictures! (the bright spot in the middle of the board in the one picture is just the flash from my phone)

http://s18.postimg.org/gnir6sanp/IMG_3934.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/gnir6sanp/)

http://s18.postimg.org/igq98ul85/IMG_3935.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/igq98ul85/)

http://s18.postimg.org/d7v8az2t1/IMG_3937.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/d7v8az2t1/)

http://s18.postimg.org/vuyqr52id/IMG_3940.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/vuyqr52id/)

http://s18.postimg.org/ku3lm4a9h/IMG_3941.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/ku3lm4a9h/)

http://s18.postimg.org/ntf3mz94l/IMG_3942.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/ntf3mz94l/)

John Loftis
11-03-2015, 10:15 AM
Thanks much for the feedback! Our goal from the beginning has been to build things just like Dave did, so your comparisons are helpful. The blocks *should* be the same size, unless something changed that I'm not aware of. I wonder if we're going a little heavier with the chamfer (on the edge) now than Dave did before. Is it too heavy/deep? Which do you prefer?

One of the extra steps we take on our maple boards is to wash them with water prior to the last grit of sanding. The water rinse raises the grain of the wood, allowing us to sand it off and achieve a smoother board for you as you use it. So if there is still a little roughness after you use and wash the board, that should be minimized and should go away pretty quickly with use-- certainly more quickly than a cutting board that didn't get this extra treatment.

Beyond those details, I really appreciate your kind words about our customer service. Like anybody, I can get my feathers ruffled, but I try really hard to treat people like I'd want to be treated.

robenco15
11-03-2015, 01:21 PM
Hi John thanks for chiming in!

I'm attaching a picture of my previous board and if you count the rows of blocks bottom to top you can see that there are only about 10 rows of blocks compared to the 11 on the new one and 5.25 blocks left to right on the old one compared to the 6 of the new one.

http://s1.postimg.org/o0uyexscb/IMG_2300.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/o0uyexscb/)

You are going heavier on the chamfer on the edge compared to the last board, but it still looks great. My only initial concern was that I stand my board up on its edge under my cabinets when I'm not using it so that I have the counter space when needed. The flat part of the edge is just wide enough to allow it to stand on its edge, but it is definitely a little bit more wobbly. I guess I'd prefer not as deep of a chamfer on the edge for that reason, but it does look great, so sorry I can't be more definitive.

I noticed immediately after cutting celery (the first thing I cut) that the grain of the wood raised up due to the moisture and after washing it a few times after cutting a bunch of other things it still has that roughness, compared to the underside (unused side) of the board that is still perfectly smooth. I'm not complaining about it though, it will eventually go away I'm sure. My bench scraper tends to help smooth it out as well. Would using some fine sand paper be something to consider here?

Thank you again!

John Loftis
11-03-2015, 05:31 PM
You could take the remaining wood fuzz off with a little 220 sandpaper. If you wrapped 1/4 of a sheet in a little block of wood, it would probably do the trick in about 20 seconds of sanding, which is about all the utility you'd get out of the sandpaper before it loaded up with beeswax and oil.

robenco15
11-03-2015, 08:52 PM
Thanks John. The only other thing about the top of the board is that I can feel all of the glue joints too. I'm assuming sanding will help that too. I have 180 sand paper. Maybe I'll try that.

robenco15
11-03-2015, 09:10 PM
Just used my 180 sandpaper. Worked wonderfully. Thanks!

robenco15
11-03-2015, 11:06 PM
One quick question I meant to ask you John. Do you recommend washing the under side of the board or even using it every once in awhile to help prevent warping? I oil the board all over, top, bottom, and sides, but in terms of use, I just use the top of the board primarily.

The most moisture the top of the board sees is when I am washing it with a soapy sponge after cutting chicken and other raw meats.

John Loftis
11-04-2015, 10:09 AM
One quick question I meant to ask you John. Do you recommend washing the under side of the board or even using it every once in awhile to help prevent warping? I oil the board all over, top, bottom, and sides, but in terms of use, I just use the top of the board primarily.

The most moisture the top of the board sees is when I am washing it with a soapy sponge after cutting chicken and other raw meats.

Great question. No need to periodically cut on the underside of the board. That would be awkward at best. But rinsing both sides when you wash the board isn't a bad idea, and oiling both sides of the board is important.