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sw2geeks
09-12-2011, 04:19 PM
Made some beef jerky (http://www.dfw.com/2011/09/12/507738/beef-jerky-101.html) this weekend. Use coffee for the marinade.

Here are a couple of pics.

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2011/09/12/07/57/Kjghd.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2011/09/12/07/56/12UqHd.St.117.jpg

Here is a link (http://www.dfw.com/2011/09/12/507738/beef-jerky-101.html) to the recipe and more photos.

HHH Knives
09-12-2011, 06:42 PM
2 of my favorite things combined! Jerky and coffee!! :D

ptolemy
09-12-2011, 06:58 PM
Very nice :)

sw2geeks
09-13-2011, 02:47 PM
That jerky was good! I am already out. Making another batch tonight. My cleaver makes short work cutting up jerky.

Delbert Ealy
09-13-2011, 04:28 PM
I havn't made it in awhile, but I used to make jerky all the time. BTW, if any of you are fairly new parents it makes a great chew for the kids when they are teething. The wife loves jerky, but not real spicy, and since I give it to the kids too, I keep the spice out. You can add spice to this, but this is what I use.
1 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tbsp liquid smoke
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 lbs beef cut 1/4 inch thick
Mix all in a 1 gallon ziplock bag and leave in the refrigerator for 24 hours


This works for a good flavor without spice, and it usually doesn't last long(everybody eats it) everybody here likes really dry jerky. The drier it is the longer it can last. The really dry stuff can last 2 years with no refrigeration if kept dry(really lean as well).
Del

SpikeC
09-13-2011, 04:46 PM
Could this be processed in a BGE at 180 or so?

PierreRodrigue
09-13-2011, 11:54 PM
I do my jerky at 140 to 160, takes a little longer, but the result is a more tender, evenly dried jerky. I don't like it too brittle. Needs to bend, no snap, for my taste anyway.

That looks very good by the way! ;)

sw2geeks
09-14-2011, 12:19 AM
Could this be processed in a BGE at 180 or so?

I think 180 is a little high, I shoot for 150. I have also heard that the green egg holds moisture like an oven. I wonder if you could use it like an oven and open it up a couple of inches to hold down the temp and let out the moisture?

Ratton
09-14-2011, 10:47 PM
I think 180 is a little high, I shoot for 150. I have also heard that the green egg holds moisture like an oven. I wonder if you could use it like an oven and open it up a couple of inches to hold down the temp and let out the moisture?

Opening it up a couple of inches will not work!! The concept of the Green Egg and other ceramic cookers is controlling the flow of air passing through the cooker. The greater the air flow the hotter it burns, so you have to keep your air flow to a bare minimum to keep the temp low. :2cents:

SpikeC
09-14-2011, 11:20 PM
I guess the convection oven is the way to go, then.

Delbert Ealy
09-15-2011, 12:30 AM
The idea is to dry the meat without cooking it(denaturing the protiens). Denaturing of protiens can happen at as low as 150 degrees F. It does happen very slow at this temp and the meat actually dries faster than the protiens denature. The closer you get to 200f the faster the protiens denature and you wind up with dry cooked steak, which is as bad as shoe leather. Salt included in the brine helps with this, as the drying process progresses the salt helps pull the moisture from the center of the meat. It can be done as low as 80f with good airflow. I have a propane fired oven and just with the pilot light on it stays about 100f in there. I have made jerky by just laying the strips on the racks and letting them stay there. This way can take 24-48 hours per batch. I did leave the broiler door cracked to allow better airflow. Of course this violates most health department standards of keeping raw meat in the danger zone(40f-140f) for more than 2 hours. So, do this at your own risk, however this is an ancient method of preserving meat for storage, and was common for both red meat and fish.
Del

sw2geeks
09-15-2011, 12:43 AM
I did another batch tonight, it is actully a little cooler in Texas right now. Was able to keep the temp around 140 on my Traeger.

SpikeC
09-15-2011, 03:27 PM
I'm thinking that running the convection fan with the oven light on should work........

sw2geeks
09-16-2011, 04:28 AM
I'm thinking that running the convection fan with the oven light on should work........

Think it should, Alton Brown has a jerky episode where he uses a box fan to dehydrate the jerky.

Diamond G
09-16-2011, 01:22 PM
Del
While I agree with you on the "danger zone" I think the salt base "cure" helps keep the bacteria in check.
Cant wait till deer season to get here!!! I usually make up a large portion of our deer harvest into jerky. Funny how a 3-5 lb bag of that stuff just disappears when left on the kitchen counter! This year my family has adopted a military unit who will be getting a large portion in their Holiday boxes!

God Bless
Mike

The hekler
09-16-2011, 01:30 PM
Think it should, Alton Brown has a jerky episode where he uses a box fan to dehydrate the jerky.

I've successfully made jerky several times following Alton's method with no ill effects. I do it in my garage with the doors open and have made batches when it was 50 degrees out and also when it was 95+. Works well although I find I need to almost double his times for drying.