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Amon-Rukh
09-14-2011, 01:00 AM
My fiancee and I recently took over a plot in the community garden from a couple that moved out of town, and while I don't have any problems coming up with stuff to do with carrots, squash and onions growing in our new patch, about half the space is taken up by swiss chard, and I have to admit I'm not too familiar with this particular green. Any tasty suggestions out there?

Eamon Burke
09-14-2011, 01:01 AM
Make this (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/mustard-green-gratin-recipe/index.html), but substitute the Mustard Greens for Chard. You won't be sorry!

Reminds me of my first year of marriage. I remember learning that Chard was extra-high in Folic Acid, and my wife got pregnant just 4 months after we got married, and I worked at a Panera Bread. I would bring her home salads(she was vegetarian at the time) and always picked out some extra Chard for her. There's always so much time to be sweet without toddlers around....

JBroida
09-14-2011, 01:02 AM
blanch, shock, saute with sweet onion and bacon

tk59
09-14-2011, 01:20 AM
It's a nice "meaty" green with not a whole lot of "stink" to it. I use it sort of like spinach with more body.

JohnnyChance
09-14-2011, 01:27 AM
blanch, shock, saute with sweet onion and bacon

Exactly what I was going to say.

If that is too healthy for you, one of the best things I have ever had in restaurant was at The Monterey in San Antonio. Roasted Bone Marrow with Creamed Swiss Chard, Sea Salt and Crostinis. That place is fckin awesome.

JBroida
09-14-2011, 02:02 AM
that sounds really good too

JohnnyChance
09-14-2011, 02:07 AM
that sounds really good too

If you are ever in San Antonio...or Texas for that matter, find your way there. The best food per dollar of any restaurant I have ever been in. Brunch is awesome too.

http://www.themontereysa.com/

James
09-14-2011, 02:23 AM
cut it up and saute with some garlic, salt and pepper; I also found that chard prepared like this goes SURPRISINGLY well with Japanese curry

JBroida
09-14-2011, 02:57 AM
If you are ever in San Antonio...or Texas for that matter, find your way there. The best food per dollar of any restaurant I have ever been in. Brunch is awesome too.

http://www.themontereysa.com/

that looks really interesting

this is not quite on the same level, but its the place i go to when i'm looking for food like that and its walking distance from the store
http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6199/6051515360_d62ecb877c_o.jpg

JohnnyChance
09-14-2011, 03:15 AM
That looks good too. These type of places are my favorite. Casual, you can run in for a quick bite by yourself and spend $20, or come in with a group of people and sit and eat and try stuff for hours, and spend $200. Similar to mattrud's place as well.

eshua
09-14-2011, 04:16 AM
Chard may be a dark leafy green, but it's doesn't tolerate heavy braising as well as kale, turnip, mustard, so saute>braise.

It'll be getting cold soon enough so soups?...beans ham chard...potato and chard...chicken, ginger, kombu, chard...

Also +1 for Jon, but find a vinegar you like and add some...helps hide how much butter you add.

Wild rice, chard, longaniza?, parm, chanterelle, stuffed pumpkin...soft boiled egg

Been at the sushi bar too long I think i forgot how other people cook.

ecchef
09-14-2011, 06:06 AM
Ravioli.

SpikeC
09-14-2011, 12:24 PM
I like to add chard to potato soup, or cannellini bean soup.

tk59
09-14-2011, 04:47 PM
that looks really interesting

this is not quite on the same level, but its the place i go to when i'm looking for food like that and its walking distance from the store
http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6199/6051515360_d62ecb877c_o.jpg

+1 Larry's is great. I totally expected to pay a lot more for what I got.

wenus2
09-14-2011, 07:16 PM
I love chard. I generally do mine sauteed with a couple Tbsp evoo (or sometimes butter) and a few cloves of garlic. Sometimes I add a little bit of good red wine (or balsamic) vinegar at the end and I always top it with a healthy amount of black pepper.

Since you are lucky enough to have control of the harvesting of the chard, I like to pick the leaves when they are just 4-8 inches tall (cut the stems low). The leaves are nice and tender at this size and the stalks may be left on as they are still quite thin. Also the plant grows very quickly so you can get many more meals out of your growing season this way. Instead of waiting for some giant leaves to form and toughen up, you get to eat the good tender stuff a half a dozen times.

Ratton
09-14-2011, 09:39 PM
I like to keep it simple, just boil/steam in some lightly salted water for 2-3 minutes then add some salt and pepper with some butter; just like I would cook spinach. I only cook my spinach about 1 1/2 - 2 minutes. Remove the stems as they are tough and if you cook it long enough for the stems to get tender then the leaves are mush!! :my2cents:

Chef Niloc
09-15-2011, 12:15 AM
I make it kind of like creamed spinach

Blanch and shock chard

Sauté onion, garlic, and shallots in butter
Deglaze with brandy
Add chard
Add heavy cream and gruyere and parmesan cheese
Salt pepper and fresh chopped dill

Amon-Rukh
09-15-2011, 10:43 PM
Wow--such great ideas! I might have to start with Chef Niloc's suggestion since it reminded me there's a nice big hunk of gruyere in the house that hasn't been put to use in a while, so this will take care of two things at once! Bacon next time! :D



Since you are lucky enough to have control of the harvesting of the chard, I like to pick the leaves when they are just 4-8 inches tall (cut the stems low). The leaves are nice and tender at this size and the stalks may be left on as they are still quite thin. Also the plant grows very quickly so you can get many more meals out of your growing season this way. Instead of waiting for some giant leaves to form and toughen up, you get to eat the good tender stuff a half a dozen times.
I will definitely pass this info along; my fiancée does the growing while I do the cooking, so this is good to know!

add
09-20-2011, 03:54 PM
Great for Japanese style fish packets in the oven.