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View Full Version : Help - I HATE my omelet pan- the steel pan thread



StephanFowler
03-08-2011, 08:51 AM
I have a 7 year old set of wolfgang puck pans (wedding gift) that has served me pretty well.

All stainless construction, riveted on handles, nice heavy bottoms.

I have only recently started making omelets regularly as my wife doesn't really care for eggs but due to diet can't have her normal breakfast fare (pancakes, oatmeal, granola cereal, etc)

so enter the 8" omelet pan from wolfgang,

I've tried everything I can think of and it STILL sticks to the dang pan.
doesn't help that my range top is a 15 year old solid element style that really doesn't understand lower heats.

is there a consistent way to season or oil the pan that could help me out, or should I go invest in a nonstick just for omelets???

Jim
03-08-2011, 09:00 AM
If you never want to buy another pan, pick up a De buyer carbon steel pan (http://www.debuyer.com/product.php?id=26)- only gets better over time.

cannibal
03-08-2011, 09:23 AM
If you never want to buy another pan, pick up a De buyer carbon steel pan (http://www.debuyer.com/product.php?id=26)- only gets better over time.

+1 this is my go-to pan for eggs. Also it helps to let the eggs sit a little so they're not so cold from the fridge.

StephanFowler
03-08-2011, 09:54 AM
+1 this is my go-to pan for eggs. Also it helps to let the eggs sit a little so they're not so cold from the fridge.

Couple questions -
A: would you specifically recommend the Blue Steel pan or would any of their carbon pans do just as well?
B: where would I look for a good vendor?


If you never want to buy another pan, pick up a De buyer carbon steel pan (http://www.debuyer.com/product.php?id=26)- only gets better over time.

Sweet, I'd never heard that before.

Vertigo
03-08-2011, 09:59 AM
Why would you want lower heats? The trick to keeping your omelets from sticking (and to making them light and fluffy) is ripping high heat.

Pensacola Tiger
03-08-2011, 10:25 AM
I can't add anything new to the carbon steel recommendations, but you might want to look into carbolose flour. It supposedly has 80% less carbohydrates than regular flour, and might allow your wife to have her pancakes in the morning:

http://www.netrition.com/tova_carbalose_page.html

Citizen Snips
03-08-2011, 10:27 AM
those are not bad pans. a trick to those is put them in a 400 degree deep fryer and it will make seasoning them much easier.

i prefer cast iron for almost anything. if you are just looking for something that doesn't stick, any non-stick omelette pan will work from sears or bed,bath,and beyond. it sounds like a little more practice will do you wonders.

it takes people a long time to learn correct heat and oiling techniques to make great omelettes. check out a few youtube videos and consider keeping you pans and save some money :D

Jim
03-08-2011, 10:31 AM
Couple questions -
A: would you specifically recommend the Blue Steel pan or would any of their carbon pans do just as well?
B: where would I look for a good vendor?



Sweet, I'd never heard that before.


They have 2 lines of product, I have never used the heavier and 10X more expensive one but did hear very good things from a couple of pro's who were in JB prince (http://www.jbprince.com/fry-pans/heavy-duty-fry-pan-10-inch-dia.asp)when I purchased one of mine.They were over the moon about them.

I heard from a member that world food(?) has great buys on this pan.

Found a photo of it new-
http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=22362

cannibal
03-08-2011, 10:41 AM
I have both the force blue and carbone plus, i would suggest the blue line since it's easier to care for and will work better with your flat top range since it's thinner. you can get them pretty cheap from costplus world market. they go on sale from time to time. i picked up the force blue crepe pan for 9 bucks the last time they were on the cheap.

StephanFowler
03-08-2011, 10:41 AM
those are not bad pans. a trick to those is put them in a 400 degree deep fryer and it will make seasoning them much easier.

i prefer cast iron for almost anything. if you are just looking for something that doesn't stick, any non-stick omelette pan will work from sears or bed,bath,and beyond. it sounds like a little more practice will do you wonders.

it takes people a long time to learn correct heat and oiling techniques to make great omelettes. check out a few youtube videos and consider keeping you pans and save some money :D


gotcha, I kept having problems with burning and sticking no matter how hot I let it get so I assumed it was either technique or temp control

Vertigo
03-08-2011, 10:57 AM
The temptation is to use butter, but it's jake at high heat so temper it with some cooking oil. Heat the pan until it's got that rippling shimmer, but the water in the butter isn't popping yet. It's a tricky sweet spot.

If the heat is too low, then you're gonna get some stick. Most proteins do this, that's why we preheat pans before putting steaks in 'em. But if it's crazy-balls hot, when you put the eggs in, the water contained inside is gonna just explode, which is also gonna give you some stick. Ideally, you want that moisture to make the eggs "puff up" but retain their protein structure, giving you bubbly eggs that are, really, just shallow frying on a layer of fat. Like Citizen said, it takes a good deal of practice to really nail it. Start to finish, your omelet should take about 15 seconds.

I use cast iron and carbon pans for almost everything, and could probably fire off an omelet on a piece of aluminum siding if I had to, but I still keep a cheap non-stick pan in the house for eggs. It just makes life easier.

SanityRemoved
03-08-2011, 11:02 AM
The De Buyer Force Blue crepe pan is a nice introduction to carbon steel. Easy to season and maintain. However if you want to use the jerking method of cooking an omelette the crepe pan is a bit low on the rim. For that method any of the other regular carbon steel pans would be a better fit.

StephanFowler
03-08-2011, 11:05 AM
The temptation is to use butter, but it's jake at high heat so temper it with some cooking oil. Heat the pan until it's got that rippling shimmer, but the water in the butter isn't popping yet. It's a tricky sweet spot.

If the heat is too low, then you're gonna get some stick. Most proteins do this, that's why we preheat pans before putting steaks in 'em. But if it's crazy-balls hot, when you put the eggs in, the water contained inside is gonna just explode, which is also gonna give you some stick. Ideally, you want that moisture to make the eggs "puff up" but retain their protein structure, giving you bubbly eggs that are, really, just shallow frying on a layer of fat. Like Citizen said, it takes a good deal of practice to really nail it. Start to finish, your omelet should take about 15 seconds.

I use cast iron and carbon pans for almost everything, and could probably fire off an omelet on a piece of aluminum siding if I had to, but I still keep a cheap non-stick pan in the house for eggs. It just makes life easier.

sweet, sounds like some practice is in order.

I really appreciate all the help (I do have an unfortunate tendency to go with crazy-balls hot)

tk59
03-08-2011, 11:15 AM
I make my omelettes in stainless. I preheat the pan close to smoking, add a little oil, dump the egg base in and then anything else I want to stuff in it (I generally precook things like mushroom and onions.), once it browns, I turn the heat down a bit and let it cook through some before I fold it over. The only time I have any problems is if cheese gets stuck to the pan.

Vertigo
03-08-2011, 11:26 AM
sweet, sounds like some practice is in order.

I really appreciate all the help (I do have an unfortunate tendency to go with crazy-balls hot)

Wait, I got more! ;)

Since it's all about controlling the temperature, which is gonna be hard enough using solid element heating, you want to minimize how much the pan cools when you introduce the eggs. As mentioned before in this thread, let them stand at room temperature for a bit before you start. Then tilt the pan to the side (so the fat forms a pool along the lip) and pour slowly into that, leveling the pan back out as you go. This will get the eggs cooking before they ever touch the pan, which will not only prevent them from sticking, but will also save your pan from a sudden drop in temperature.

StephanFowler
03-08-2011, 11:40 AM
Wait, I got more! ;)

Since it's all about controlling the temperature, which is gonna be hard enough using solid element heating, you want to minimize how much the pan cools when you introduce the eggs. As mentioned before in this thread, let them stand at room temperature for a bit before you start. Then tilt the pan to the side (so the fat forms a pool along the lip) and pour slowly into that, leveling the pan back out as you go. This will get the eggs cooking before they ever touch the pan, which will not only prevent them from sticking, but will also save your pan from a sudden drop in temperature.



what about added veggies, obviously precook them but should they be introduced hot (straight out of the other pan) or room temp?

Vertigo
03-08-2011, 11:57 AM
I pull the omelet and fold it before it's finished cooking, letting it's own heat finish it off. Doing it like that, I introduce the fillings hot right before folding. Some people take a more "frittata" approach, in which case you can introduce them lukewarm.

FryBoy
03-08-2011, 12:02 PM
Like your wife, I'm not a big egg fan; I'm happy with my nonstick and see no reason to switch. I suggest you try one before devoting a lot of money and energy to producing the perfect omelet for someone who would rather have a bowl of oatmeal.

phasedweasel
03-08-2011, 12:36 PM
Like Citizen said, it takes a good deal of practice to really nail it. Start to finish, your omelet should take about 15 seconds.

How many eggs do you use for your omelette?

Vertigo
03-08-2011, 12:49 PM
How many eggs do you use for your omelette?

Three, usually.

JohnnyChance
03-08-2011, 02:23 PM
If you do get a nonstick pan, just get a cheapo. An expensive allclad or whatever lose their coating like anything else. Throwing away a $20 pan is easier to stomach than a $200. I do have pretty good luck with Scanpan nonsticks, so if you do want to pay for a nicer nonstick pan, I would recommend them.

la2tokyo
03-08-2011, 02:33 PM
After reading everyone recommend de Buyer pans for the last few months I ordered a de Buyer Mineral 8" pan from Amazon and it came yesterday. I can already tell after using it three times that buying this pan was the best money I have ever spent on kitchen equipment. I don't know how I've been living without it. I cooked pork chops in it, sauteed vegetables, and cooked eggs in it this morning. I can't imagine buying another piece of equipment for $40 that I would never want to replace for the rest of my life, but I already like the de Buyer better than my All Clad. I ordered three more pans today. Even if you do decide to go with a dedicated non-stick for eggs after you buy a carbon steel pan, I don't think that there's any way that it could be a bad purchase because you're gonna fall in love with it as soon as you pick it up. The eggs did feel a tiny, tiny bit "sticky" on the edges this morning, although they were far from sticking, and I'm sure the non-stick properties of this pan will get better very quickly with heavy use.

Practically every other kitchen tool that I own that I consider perfect cost me a lot of money. This is one of the only things I own that I can honestly say I don't want the more expensive version of, even if I could buy it for the same price. It really feels like a professional tool.

Note: The 8" pan may be a little small for a three egg omelet.

apicius9
03-08-2011, 06:52 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWmvfUKwBrg

'nuff said!

Stefan

SpikeC
03-08-2011, 07:42 PM
The clip about McD fries is rather good as well!

UnConundrum
03-08-2011, 09:13 PM
Someone has to have an IR thermometer and can give us that exact "sweet spot" for pan temp. C'mon, let's make it scientific.

StephanFowler
03-08-2011, 09:25 PM
Someone has to have an IR thermometer and can give us that exact "sweet spot" for pan temp. C'mon, let's make it scientific.

+1, I'd like to know.

it just sounds like a fun endeavor.

SpikeC
03-08-2011, 09:35 PM
Harbor Freight has an IR thermo for not much money now...........

cannibal
03-08-2011, 10:42 PM
Harbor Freight has an IR thermo for not much money now...........

20 bucks if you wait for just the right time ;) even at 30 bucks it is a good price.

I keep wanting to pick up a flir thermal camera, i would totally point it at a pan if i ended up getting one just to see what the heat pattern is like across different materials. I just realized how nerdy i sound

Pensacola Tiger
03-08-2011, 11:14 PM
20 bucks if you wait for just the right time ;) even at 30 bucks it is a good price.

I keep wanting to pick up a flir thermal camera, i would totally point it at a pan if i ended up getting one just to see what the heat pattern is like across different materials. I just realized how nerdy i sound

Nahh, you've just been watching too much Alton Brown on the Food Network.

olpappy
03-09-2011, 03:29 PM
20 bucks if you wait for just the right time ;) even at 30 bucks it is a good price.

I keep wanting to pick up a flir thermal camera, i would totally point it at a pan if i ended up getting one just to see what the heat pattern is like across different materials. I just realized how nerdy i sound

Now that sounds really cool. Why don't you develop a Masters degree thesis with analysis of flir images of various types of cookware pans? You could be the next Verhoeven

EdipisReks
03-09-2011, 06:40 PM
in my experience, the secret to a perfect omelet (i typically make French omelets, which are quickly ruined by sticking) is to use plenty of butter (i never use oil) to float the eggs on, and to constantly separate the edges until the omelet has set. i've made perfect omelets on a bunch of different pans, both straight sided and curved, stainless to cast iron. with butter and constant separation, temperature control is less important. it's technique, not equipment.

StephanFowler
03-12-2011, 10:24 PM
The temptation is to use butter, but it's jake at high heat so temper it with some cooking oil. Heat the pan until it's got that rippling shimmer, but the water in the butter isn't popping yet. It's a tricky sweet spot.

If the heat is too low, then you're gonna get some stick. Most proteins do this, that's why we preheat pans before putting steaks in 'em. But if it's crazy-balls hot, when you put the eggs in, the water contained inside is gonna just explode, which is also gonna give you some stick. Ideally, you want that moisture to make the eggs "puff up" but retain their protein structure, giving you bubbly eggs that are, really, just shallow frying on a layer of fat. Like Citizen said, it takes a good deal of practice to really nail it. Start to finish, your omelet should take about 15 seconds.

I use cast iron and carbon pans for almost everything, and could probably fire off an omelet on a piece of aluminum siding if I had to, but I still keep a cheap non-stick pan in the house for eggs. It just makes life easier.


Wait, I got more! ;)

Since it's all about controlling the temperature, which is gonna be hard enough using solid element heating, you want to minimize how much the pan cools when you introduce the eggs. As mentioned before in this thread, let them stand at room temperature for a bit before you start. Then tilt the pan to the side (so the fat forms a pool along the lip) and pour slowly into that, leveling the pan back out as you go. This will get the eggs cooking before they ever touch the pan, which will not only prevent them from sticking, but will also save your pan from a sudden drop in temperature.


in my experience, the secret to a perfect omelet (i typically make French omelets, which are quickly ruined by sticking) is to use plenty of butter (i never use oil) to float the eggs on, and to constantly separate the edges until the omelet has set. i've made perfect omelets on a bunch of different pans, both straight sided and curved, stainless to cast iron. with butter and constant separation, temperature control is less important. it's technique, not equipment.



apparently this was some seriously solid advice

omelets this morning were just about perfect (had a little brown spot where I had turned away for a second to wash a dish)
nice and fluffy, cooked through

i used my 10" pan instead of the 8" which seemed to help a lot too

SpikeC
03-12-2011, 10:40 PM
it's technique, not equipment.

In other words, it's the Indian, not the arrow!

Vertigo
03-13-2011, 12:54 AM
apparently this was some seriously solid advice

omelets this morning were just about perfect (had a little brown spot where I had turned away for a second to wash a dish)
nice and fluffy, cooked through

i used my 10" pan instead of the 8" which seemed to help a lot too

Glad they worked out!

EdipisReks
03-13-2011, 03:43 AM
there is nothing like a good omelet. :) more than one way to get it done, too, which is part of the fun.

Jay
03-13-2011, 11:13 AM
I have a very nice black steel pan from Alessi that set me back a ridiculous $80 (in 1990!) http://badgerandblade.com/vb/images/smilies/yellow_guys/w00t.gif Others I bought at the time were $8-$15.

Frankly, the pans from Mauviel, DeBuyer, and Matfer-Bourgeat are every bit as good. I think they're more versatile that cast iron pans, which are wonderful.

Found a pic:
http://www.alessi-shop.com/ashop-us/images/D/D1094_172401280746689.jpg
$112 is insane for a carbon pan.

chazmtb
03-17-2011, 03:29 PM
Does anyone know what the difference between world cuisine heavy duty carbon frypan, Paderno, or de Bebuyer mineral is? It seems to me that the world cuisine (de Buyer's cheaper line???) and Paderno are about the same. Wondering if I should go with de Buyer mineral. I am looking for two pans, a 11 and a 14 inch. The de Buyer is about 30 more for each pan than the other two mentioned brands.

Dave Martell
03-17-2011, 05:22 PM
Also, to add another question, where do you guys shop for de Buyer?

Jim
03-17-2011, 05:25 PM
Also, to add another question, where do you guys shop for de Buyer?

JB Prince (http://www.jbprince.com/fry-pans/heavy-duty-fry-pan-10-inch-dia.asp) but they are far from the cheapest, just convenient.

Dave Martell
03-17-2011, 05:27 PM
They must be in the city Jim?

Jim
03-17-2011, 05:28 PM
They must be in the city Jim?

Yes Sir.

Kyle
03-17-2011, 06:06 PM
Also, to add another question, where do you guys shop for de Buyer?

I'm about ready to pull the trigger on Amazon. Someone mentioned that World Market carries them but I didn't see them when I was there last weekend. I think Williams Sonoma carries them as well, but I'm worried they're severely overpriced.

Does anyone else have any input on De Buyer's cheaper line vs. the mineral line? Should I just get the more expensive stuff and be done with it?

SpikeC
03-17-2011, 06:08 PM
One never regrets buying quality............................

so_sleepy
03-18-2011, 03:36 AM
Does anyone know what the difference between world cuisine heavy duty carbon frypan, Paderno, or de Bebuyer mineral is? It seems to me that the world cuisine (de Buyer's cheaper line???) and Paderno are about the same. Wondering if I should go with de Buyer mineral. I am looking for two pans, a 11 and a 14 inch. The de Buyer is about 30 more for each pan than the other two mentioned brands.

Paderno is the manufacturer "World Cuisine" is their U.S. distributor. The Paderno and De Buyer pans are comparable in dimensions and the thickness of the steel. I have a De Buyer, but I have never seen a negative review of the Paderno. As far as the price difference, Paderno's are manufactured in China, De Buyer claim to be made in France.

I just checked prices and the De Buyer pans are considerably more expensive than when I got mine two years ago. You used to be able to get the 10" for about $30. The price has almost doubled.

so_sleepy
03-18-2011, 03:44 AM
Does anyone else have any input on De Buyer's cheaper line vs. the mineral line? Should I just get the more expensive stuff and be done with it?

The Force Blue and La Lyonnaise lines are cheaper. The main difference is that they are thinner gauge steel. The Mineral line are 2.5 to 3mm thick depending on the size of the pan. They are almost as heavy as cast iron.

If heat retention is important to you, go for the Mineral.

Jay
03-18-2011, 09:56 AM
JB Prince (http://www.jbprince.com/fry-pans/heavy-duty-fry-pan-10-inch-dia.asp) but they are far from the cheapest, just convenient.

JB Prince may not be the cheapest, but they're not outrageous as some other specialty places are. Moreover, carbon steel pans are notoriously cheap and hard to sell, since the average person would avoid them like the plague. Only pro chefs and confirmed foodies even know about them, so they tend to fly under the radar and remain inexpensive. My favorite carbon steel crepe pan set me back a whopping $8, from Dean & DeLuca, no less- they're not exactly known for bargains!

chazmtb
03-19-2011, 01:25 PM
Just got a debuyer 9.5 inch high wall force blue pan at world market for 20 + 25% off. Regular price 40. Tried the mineral debuyer at Williams sanoma and that baby was heavy. Debating whether to get the 12.5 pan. Maybe getting the thinner walled force blue or paderno.

StephanFowler
03-20-2011, 09:24 AM
success tastes pretty awesome this morning

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/16341926/IMG_20110320_091006.jpg

Kyle
03-21-2011, 11:42 AM
Just got a debuyer 9.5 inch high wall force blue pan at world market for 20 + 25% off. Regular price 40. Tried the mineral debuyer at Williams sanoma and that baby was heavy. Debating whether to get the 12.5 pan. Maybe getting the thinner walled force blue or paderno.

I actually bought the exact same pan at Wolrd Market this weekend for exactly the same price. I've only used it a couple times but so far it's really nice!

It's normal for the seasoning to be really splotchy at first, right?

Jim
03-21-2011, 11:50 AM
Yes- unless you want to go to some small effort to season it. I go outside to the BBQ get the pan and lard smoking hot, flip it upside down on the off side of the grill and close the cover, in 15 min or so flip it over back on the heat and repeat. do it 3-4 times and you should have a great seasoning.

Kyle
03-21-2011, 12:22 PM
Yes- unless you want to go to some small effort to season it. I go outside to the BBQ get the pan and lard smoking hot, flip it upside down on the off side of the grill and close the cover, in 15 min or so flip it over back on the heat and repeat. do it 3-4 times and you should have a great seasoning.

I did the pototo peel thing, then coated it canola oil and turned my stove on high and used the paper towel method like seasoning a wok. Then I cooked some homemade chorizo in it. However, when it was done it still wasn't very black, so I decided coat it in flaxseed oil and bake it in the oven 500* for an hour. Now it's black, but it's not totally even and there are blotchy shapes in the pan. I'm thinking I need to stop thinking about it and just use it and it will even out naturally over time.

This isn't my pan, but it's a picture on the net of something that sorta demonstrates what is going on with mine. I'm just trying to make sure I'm on the right path.

http://ouichefcook.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/pancomp-1024x958.jpg

chazmtb
03-21-2011, 01:20 PM
Mine was the same, I tried the peel, canola like the instructions said. Yes it gets blotchy. I guess I am going to use it more or do the lard thing like Jim said. From what I have read, regarding seasoning of cast iron, lard is the best.

I might go back to get another pan, BTW.

phasedweasel
03-25-2011, 11:33 AM
What is the unnamed de Buyer fry pan that Williams Sonoma carries online only? They have the Mineral (~$60), and an online-only "fry pan" with the same shape (not the Country Fry Pan) for ~$40.

What other brick and mortar stores sells these pans? I looked at World Market but I do not see de Buyer listed on their website.

Jay
03-25-2011, 04:33 PM
The seasoning will become much more even with continued use. These are pans that are great if you use them all the time; not so great if used infrequently.

http://badgerandblade.com/vb/attachment.php?attachmentid=34729&stc=1&d=1227284192

Dave Martell
03-25-2011, 05:16 PM
Pretty pans! :tongue4:

kalaeb
03-25-2011, 06:04 PM
What is the unnamed de Buyer fry pan that Williams Sonoma carries online only? They have the Mineral (~$60), and an online-only "fry pan" with the same shape (not the Country Fry Pan) for ~$40.

What other brick and mortar stores sells these pans? I looked at World Market but I do not see de Buyer listed on their website.

They are probably Paderno pans and are similar to De Buyer, but usually $20.00-$40.00 less.

so_sleepy
03-26-2011, 01:33 AM
What is the unnamed de Buyer fry pan that Williams Sonoma carries online only? They have the Mineral (~$60), and an online-only "fry pan" with the same shape (not the Country Fry Pan) for ~$40.


Those are the De Buyer "Force Blue" line. They are thinner gauge steel, 2mm thick vs 2.5-3mm for the mineral line.

Smarcus
03-26-2011, 01:32 PM
I purchased a 12 inch frypan from a William Sonoma store and it's a Mineral 3mm.

Hanzo
03-28-2011, 05:49 AM
I'm having some issues with mine sadly, a Debuyer mineral B. I used a thin layer of peanut oil on it, then but it into the oven on around 500 for about 1 hour. Made some bacon on it after that, and that turned out great and everything looked as I guess it should. Tried to wok some chicken strips on it the other day, and that was a total failure. The chicken stuck like it was on crazy clue... Not sure what I'm doing wrong, it's my first carbon pan.

Should I do something different to season it? Exchange the peanut oil with Crisco?

Jim
03-28-2011, 09:39 AM
I'm having some issues with mine sadly, a Debuyer mineral B. I used a thin layer of peanut oil on it, then but it into the oven on around 500 for about 1 hour. Made some bacon on it after that, and that turned out great and everything looked as I guess it should. Tried to wok some chicken strips on it the other day, and that was a total failure. The chicken stuck like it was on crazy clue... Not sure what I'm doing wrong, it's my first carbon pan.

Should I do something different to season it? Exchange the peanut oil with Crisco?

Welcome to KKF Hanzo!

One trip to the heat with oil is more than likely not enough, I would strip it with oven cleaner and wipe down with bacon fat heat it up to 500, remove wipe down again and so forth every 15-20 min. Remember to flip it upsidedown so you get no pooling

aintnojive
03-28-2011, 10:07 AM
Can you ever get the seasoning to the point that you can cook sauces in a carbon steel pan? I've got an 11" that I seasoned per the instructions, and thought I had a nice even seasoning on it, only to have it flake off into my sauce. So, I scrubbed it bare, and tried again. It's fine for meat, and sticking isn't much of an issue, but the seasoning still seems weak...like I've got a layer of carbon rather than a truly bonded layer.

I managed to warp the base a little on my crappy old stove, so I'm tempted to just start fresh with a new pan.

Jim
03-28-2011, 10:11 AM
Can you ever get the seasoning to the point that you can cook sauces in a carbon steel pan? I've got an 11" that I seasoned per the instructions, and thought I had a nice even seasoning on it, only to have it flake off into my sauce. So, I scrubbed it bare, and tried again. It's fine for meat, and sticking isn't much of an issue, but the seasoning still seems weak...like I've got a layer of carbon rather than a truly bonded layer.

I managed to warp the base a little on my crappy old stove, so I'm tempted to just start fresh with a new pan.

Welcome to KKF!
Its worth a shot to strip it bare and reseason as discribed above. I like to do it outside on the gas grill to keep the smoke out of the house.

SpikeC
03-28-2011, 01:22 PM
I think that sometimes it is best to be patient and let the seasoning build on it's own over time, that allows it to really permeate the pores of the metal and become part of the pan, rather than sitting on the pan. Fry lots of bacon, hamburgers, pork cheeks, and when in doubt slide the product around as it goes into the pan so it can dry the surface instead of bonding. My Griswold #9 developed this way. (got it for a dollar in 1971)

Kyle
03-28-2011, 01:25 PM
I've only had my De Buyer for about a week but it's my favorite pan. It's really light compared to cast iron, but not wimpy like cheap pans and it browns meat much better than my CI pans and is already much more non-stick than anything else I have. I can't believe I didn't get one before.

Hanzo
03-28-2011, 01:33 PM
Welcome to KKF Hanzo!

One trip to the heat with oil is more than likely not enough, I would strip it with oven cleaner and wipe down with bacon fat heat it up to 500, remove wipe down again and so forth every 15-20 min. Remember to flip it upsidedown so you get no pooling

Thanks for the reply! Could I use peanut oil or Crisco for this? Dont know if I have access to bacon fat

kalaeb
03-28-2011, 01:48 PM
Thanks for the reply! Could I use peanut oil or Crisco for this? Dont know if I have access to bacon fat



I use Crisco for my seasoning and it works like a champ, and I have had no issues with flaking. I also believe peanut oil works great because of its high smoke point.

Kyle
03-28-2011, 01:55 PM
Thanks for the reply! Could I use peanut oil or Crisco for this? Dont know if I have access to bacon fat

My local grocery store sells "bacon ends" that are basically just the edges of the sliced bacon that have been cut off because they're too fatty. They sell this pretty cheap, I would imagine if you fry this up a couple times you'll get a good seasoning.

SpikeC
03-28-2011, 02:05 PM
As well as a good soup starter!

Jim
03-28-2011, 02:08 PM
Amen!:thumbsup:

aintnojive
03-29-2011, 03:05 PM
Alright, stripped it bare last night and reseasoned with lard this time. In the past I've used olive oil (all I had), so I'm hoping that was part of the problem. I went ahead and broke it in this morning with a nice 3 egg omelet using the techniques suggested here...came out great. It's still too early to tell how it will hold up, but I'm gonna "baby" the seasoning a bit and take my other pans out of rotation so this one gets lots of use.

Kyle
03-29-2011, 04:44 PM
Made the trip to Williams Sonoma yesterday to buy the 12" De Buyer Mineral pan. It was the same price as Amazon so in that case I just wanted to go get it now rather than wait. The Mineral pan is definitely VERY heavy and thick. The weight is right there with my 12" Lodge cast iron skillet, but I'm so used to the cast iron stuff that the weight doesn't bother me. The girl behind the counter couldn't get over how heavy it was.

bikehunter
03-29-2011, 05:10 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWmvfUKwBrg

'nuff said!

Stefan

+1 on Julia's old egg show. After watching it many times, and Pepin's method from his Complete Techniques series (also watched many times) I have ZERO problems with omelets in a seasoned iron or nonstick (and some practice of course). As for seasoning pans.....pork fat...nothing better. Also should add...I find that it helps a great deal to make sure the eggs are well mixed. I beat mine with a fork between 60-80 times.
Pepin:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57afEWn-QDg

chazmtb
04-05-2011, 03:16 PM
I purchased a 12 inch frypan from a William Sonoma store and it's a Mineral 3mm.

How do you like the mineral pan so far? I love my force blue 9.5 that I got at world market for eggs. I am planning to get a mineral 12.5 and a 14.5 country fry pan. Planning to replace my nonstick 14" saute pan, and the 12 stainless for meat searing and frypan. Found a cheap place to buy deBuyer.

http://www.bakertowne.com/1753/de-Buyer-5510.32--12.5%22--Mineral-Round-Frypan.html
http://www.bakertowne.com/servlet/the-1635/country-fry-pan,-country/Detail

jheis
04-09-2011, 12:32 AM
FYI, Just stopped by Cost Plus World Market.

They've got the de Buyer 9.5" Force Blue on sale for $19.99 (50% off). Looks like the price is good through 4.20.11. Picked one up but haven't tried it yet.

James

chazmtb
04-09-2011, 06:34 PM
Yep, that's the pan that has me going on this craze. I'm getting a carbone plus 12.5 and a 14.5 country fry pan within the next week or so. Chose the carbone plus over the mineral because it had the second handle, that may come useful. It is the same one that Jim had pictured earlier.

Rottman
04-10-2011, 06:48 PM
I'm getting a carbone plus 12.5 [...] Chose the carbone plus over the mineral because it had the second handle, that may come useful.

Got the 12.5 a while ago and that second handle sure is useful, that sucker weighs 2.8 kilos...

Amon-Rukh
04-11-2011, 02:54 AM
You guys are getting luckier than I am! Went to World Market today to have a look at the 9.5 inch pan since I want something nice for making tortilla espanola but no dice--the pan was there (and looking good) but full price and no discounts in sight! Guess I'll have to keep looking!

wenus2
04-11-2011, 03:52 AM
I am planning to get a mineral 12.5 (...) deBuyer.

FYI: Mine weighs just about spot on 6lbs when empty. That's a lot of weight at the end of that long handle, esp. with something in it.
I don't mind it so much, but the Mrs. can't wield it at all.

Fantastic pan though, fries country potatoes like nobodies business. All that mass keeps the heat up when you need it!

rahimlee54
04-11-2011, 01:00 PM
They have the 9.5 at world market here for 20 plus a coupon I have so I am gonna go pick one of these up this week sometime. I have been meaning to try one for a while at that price I might get 2.

jheis
04-11-2011, 04:03 PM
You guys are getting luckier than I am! Went to World Market today to have a look at the 9.5 inch pan since I want something nice for making tortilla espanola but no dice--the pan was there (and looking good) but full price and no discounts in sight! Guess I'll have to keep looking!

You should try taking it up to the register & having them scan it. When I bought mine the price was adjusted automatically at check out, so the discount should be in their system.

James

Kyle
04-11-2011, 04:40 PM
They have the 9.5 at world market here for 20 plus a coupon I have so I am gonna go pick one of these up this week sometime. I have been meaning to try one for a while at that price I might get 2.

I just got a $10 off a $30 in store purchase coupon. I'm thinking of getting another 9.5" pan plus something else and taking advantage of the discount. It's a great pan, I could always use an extra.

rahimlee54
04-11-2011, 06:47 PM
I am in the same boat, can't decide 2 pans and 1 coupon or 1 pan and some food products. Perhaps 2 coupons and 2 pans and food stuff?

crizq0
06-09-2011, 10:18 PM
Looks like some of you have had the De buyer pan for a few months now. How are you guys enjoying it?
Let see some pictures of some seasoned pans!
:thumbsup:

Anybody know of any good deals on the pan? World market doesn't have them on sale anymore

Lefty
06-09-2011, 10:30 PM
What's a 9" blue steel run in the States? I think mine was $25 a few years ago. It is by far, my favourite pan!
I'll take and post a pic soon (if I remember).

Jim
06-09-2011, 10:30 PM
I had some free time this week and brought two pans and an 8 qt dutch oven down to bare metal and polished them back up to 600 grit. I am trying the flaxseed oil season. More to follow.

Dave Martell
06-09-2011, 10:34 PM
Please post pictures!

Michael Rader
06-10-2011, 12:22 AM
You guys rock. My finance' and I were just talking about making omelets this morning. Going to have to buy one of those.
-M

Jim
06-10-2011, 01:43 AM
Please post pictures!

With your seasoning jobs it should be you posting the toutorial


You guys rock. My finance' and I were just talking about making omelets this morning. Going to have to buy one of those.
-M

How about a trade, Knife for seasoned pan?:jumpy:

Rottman
06-10-2011, 07:03 PM
My finance' and I
Is that something Freudian you got going there?

Kyle
06-10-2011, 07:24 PM
I had some free time this week and brought two pans and an 8 qt dutch oven down to bare metal and polished them back up to 600 grit. I am trying the flaxseed oil season. More to follow.

Please post pictures when you're done. A before and after would be great if possible.

Just curious, how coarse did you start and did you sand by hand?

My 12" De Buyer Mineral pan is a joy to use and is so non-stick that a fried egg just slides around, but it hasn't turned black yet, its just a very splotchy brown, even after 2-3 months of use. It doesn't bother me because, as I said, it's non-stick, but sometimes guests will see me cooking it and think I'm using a dirty pan. I don't think I ever seasoned it in an oven, I'm pretty sure I just burned some oil on a stove and started using it. Perhaps I'll try oiling it and then put it in the oven or on the grill to see if that helps give it a nice black patina, because so far it hasn't turned black through use.

Lefty
06-10-2011, 08:28 PM
Why mess with what is working? This is a voice of experience on this issue.

Kyle
06-10-2011, 09:04 PM
Why mess with what is working? This is a voice of experience on this issue.

That's how I feel, but there were a couple people who thought I was cooking in a dirty pan and one friend's girlfriend refused to eat what I made in the pan. :rolleyes2:

I guess I shouldn't worry about it, there are just some people that are hard or impossible to please.

For reference, here's a shot of my pan.

http://load.hostphotofree.com/3964815ca2f9cabe01b50628954537f1/photo.JPG

SpikeC
06-10-2011, 09:32 PM
Don't cook for her again!

Lars
06-11-2011, 02:37 AM
I had some free time this week and brought two pans and an 8 qt dutch oven down to bare metal and polished them back up to 600 grit. I am trying the flaxseed oil season. More to follow.

I have had great results from applying multiple coats of flaxseed oil - especially on my old cast iron stuff.
My Carbon Plus pan did not turn completely black, but cosmetics aside, it works as it should.

Hope it works out well for you too..

Lars

Lefty
06-11-2011, 06:58 AM
Kyle,
Explain to her that you are heating the pan up to well past 175F (think chicken...you can even prove it to her by smoking some veg oil in a pan - 325F, or so, I believe) and that she has nothing to worry about. Once people realize that the brown spots won't flake off and the pans get too hot to be of much concern (and you wipe it out, etc) they inevitably come around. And if she doesn't, just do what Spike said! :)

Jim
06-11-2011, 09:20 AM
Kyle,
I started at 150 and went to 600 grit I used a palm sander on the flat spots.

I have about 6 coats of the flax oil on now and the pans are a translucent brown.

mikemac
06-11-2011, 09:29 AM
.....one friend's girlfriend refused to eat what I made ....

Better warn your friend if she thinks thats the dirtiest thing she'll put in her mouth.

Kyle
06-11-2011, 05:27 PM
Kyle,
Explain to her that you are heating the pan up to well past 175F (think chicken...you can even prove it to her by smoking some veg oil in a pan - 325F, or so, I believe) and that she has nothing to worry about. Once people realize that the brown spots won't flake off and the pans get too hot to be of much concern (and you wipe it out, etc) they inevitably come around. And if she doesn't, just do what Spike said! :)

Yeah, most people can be reasoned with, but it's similar to when I'm making BBQ and I have to convince people that the chicken is pink because of the smoking process and is normal and not undercooked. Some people simply refuse to eat it because they think it's raw. :rolleyes2:


Kyle,
I started at 150 and went to 600 grit I used a palm sander on the flat spots.

I have about 6 coats of the flax oil on now and the pans are a translucent brown.

Thanks for the info! So even at 150 and a palm sander you never thought it was too aggressive?


Better warn your friend if she thinks thats the dirtiest thing she'll put in her mouth.

Oh that's just wrong! :rofl2:

Jim
06-12-2011, 09:05 PM
Here is a quick shot of two steel pans done with the flax seed oil treatment.
http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/displayimage.php?imageid=27221 (http://badgerandblade.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=27221)

SpikeC
06-12-2011, 09:31 PM
Now those are some pretty patinas! Anyone who won't eat from them should just starve!

markk
06-12-2011, 09:47 PM
those pans look great, I am going to have to try that on one of mine.

heirkb
06-12-2011, 10:32 PM
Jim, is there an advantage to the flaxseed oil?

Also, do you guys wash these pans with soap every time you use them or does that ruin the season?

Jim
06-12-2011, 10:52 PM
Jim, is there an advantage to the flaxseed oil?

Also, do you guys wash these pans with soap every time you use them or does that ruin the season?

It is supposed to hold up and preform better than some other oils. we will see.
I always wash them with soap and water.

Dave Martell
06-12-2011, 11:01 PM
Oh those pans are beautiful Jim!

Ratton
06-13-2011, 08:09 AM
Jim, is there an advantage to the flaxseed oil?

Hi There,

Here is a link to a good article on why and how to use flaxseed oil: http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/:whistling:

Lars
06-13-2011, 08:42 AM
two steel pans done with the flax seed oil treatment.

Looks way better than mine - well done..

Lars

olpappy
06-18-2011, 07:14 PM
More questions about size and thickness of carbon steel pans.

A 9.5" pan will fit on the small burner, 11" pan fits a large burner, but what about 10.25" diameter pan, is it meant to go on the large or small burner?

Also the heavy carbone plus are about 2-3 mm thick and heavy as cast iron, the black or blue steel pans are only 1.3-1.5mm thick, much lighter and easier to handle. The heat holding properties of heavy pans is obvious, what about the light thin pans, in a pro kitchen what kind of tasks would the thinner pans be well suited for?

heirkb
06-18-2011, 07:45 PM
I'm trying the flaxseed oil now, too. Thanks for the link, Ratton. That was a very useful read.

mateo
06-19-2011, 12:19 AM
It is supposed to hold up and preform better than some other oils. we will see.
I always wash them with soap and water.

Interesting, I have a 3 Carbone Plus pans (with cast iron handles, not the stamped steel ones :D) and I haven't had much luck with Flax Seed seasoning... I think it's a heat issue though. I'll have to give it another go now that yours turned out awesome.

olpappy
09-15-2011, 04:16 PM
Resurrecting this thread because it is such a great source of information.

Anyone with feedback on how their Flax Seed seasoning performs compared to their old seasoning? I burned some onions and screwed up the seasoning on one of my pans, looks like I will have to strip and re-season it using the Flax seed.

so_sleepy
09-15-2011, 04:25 PM
Also, where are you buying flaxseed oil?

Kyle
09-15-2011, 04:37 PM
Resurrecting this thread because it is such a great source of information.

Anyone with feedback on how their Flax Seed seasoning performs compared to their old seasoning? I burned some onions and screwed up the seasoning on one of my pans, looks like I will have to strip and re-season it using the Flax seed.

I love the flaxseed seasoning on my 100 year old Griswold cast iron skillets, but in my DeBuyer carbon pans I didn't like the forced seasoning I put it on so I stripped it off and started all over, just fried some bacon then started using it and to let it develop naturally. That's just my experience.

kalaeb
09-15-2011, 04:49 PM
I love the flaxseed seasoning on my 100 year old Griswold cast iron skillets, but in my DeBuyer carbon pans I didn't like the forced seasoning I put it on so I stripped it off and started all over, just fried some bacon then started using it and to let it develop naturally. That's just my experience.

2nd this, each to their own, but in my experience, every time I forced a seasoning it flaked off after some use. There should really be no reason for the seasoning to come off, even if you burn onions in in. Just scour and let it go natural. Natural is better anyway...

ajhuff
09-15-2011, 05:52 PM
Great thread and since so much is discussed here I thought I would post my question here rather than start a new thread. Kind of keep everything together.

I love cast iron, for more reasons than just cooking :) We are one. I have mostly Lodge but also a very old Griswold and what I think might be a Wagner. I also have a large and heavy DeMeyere skillet that I absolutely love. I have a little non-stick aluminum pan from LOOK that I use for frying up an egg or two.

All these pans have one thing in common. NO RIVETS. I despise All-Clad, Calphalon and the others for their damn rivets. It looks like all the DuBuyer pans have rivets. Grrrr. That pic of the Alessi pan looks promising. Anyone know of any other brands of carbon steel pans that don't have rivets?

Thanks,

-AJ

so_sleepy
09-15-2011, 06:15 PM
I believe Vollrath carbon steel pans are welded, not riveted. I have never found one to see it in person. it seems like they are almost always sold through restaurant supply stores but the ones in my area don't have them.

According the the specs, the Vollrath pans are 16 gauge steel which should be lighter than even DeBuyer Force Blue line.

ajhuff
09-15-2011, 09:50 PM
That Alessi pan appears to be a multi-ply clad pan, not a true carbon steel pan. I'll look into the Vollrath pan. Looks like Matfer might be a good candidate too. Any comments on how Matfer compares to the beloved DuBuyer?

Thanks,

-AJ

rahimlee54
09-15-2011, 09:57 PM
You can get flax oil at a health food store. It worked great on the cast iron, not so well on the carbon. Stripped it off and just put some vege oil on it and after 3 coats, and a small grease fire, my pan is now egg friendly.

markk
09-16-2011, 05:56 AM
I did the flaxseed oil coating my debyer pans. it looked great but has mostly come off on the inside of the pans and I am back to a natural seasoning. I would not bother doing this (flaxseed) with a new pan and would just season naturally with the oils that you cook with.

jheis
11-03-2011, 09:21 PM
Just a heads up....

Cost Plus World Market has the 24 cm (9.5") de Buyer Force Blue on sale again for $19.99 (50% off) through the 13th.

James

UnConundrum
11-04-2011, 08:56 AM
Do you have a link? I can't find it on their site.

jheis
11-04-2011, 01:22 PM
I don't have a link, I picked one up in the local brick & mortar yesterday. Sign said the sale goes until 11/13.

James

sashae
11-06-2011, 10:24 AM
Are the steel pans significantly different than cast iron in terms of cooking performance? I've got a #9 Griswold I use for eggs now, but kinda requires that a I do a 3-4 egg omelette to fold properly since the pan's so wide. I've been thinking about hunting a smaller Griswold, but if one of these cheaper steel pans'll fit the bill, I'd be inclined...

UnConundrum
11-06-2011, 12:05 PM
Mark, where is that store located? Maybe they'll ship.....

Kyle
11-07-2011, 01:25 PM
Are the steel pans significantly different than cast iron in terms of cooking performance? I've got a #9 Griswold I use for eggs now, but kinda requires that a I do a 3-4 egg omelette to fold properly since the pan's so wide. I've been thinking about hunting a smaller Griswold, but if one of these cheaper steel pans'll fit the bill, I'd be inclined...

FWIW, I prefer both of my DeBuyer carbon pans to my Griswold and Lodge skillets. The carbon pans were very non-stick after only seasoning one time. I have both the 9.5" Force Blue version (the one that's on sale right now) and a 12" from their Mineral line that I got from Williams Sonoma. The 12" is very heavy, similar to the 12" Lodge skillet I have. The 9.5" is very light weight and is my go to pan most of the time. I'll probably pick another one up if my local store has any.

crizq0
11-26-2011, 01:00 PM
de buyer blue version is still on sale at world market when I checked yesterday. Sign says until the 28th but i'm sure it might last thru the holiday season.

ajhuff
12-31-2011, 06:43 PM
I got a 10 1/4" Matfer Bourgeat for Christmas!!! I'm thrilled that it has no rivets. Quite heavy. Which makes sense to me as it seems to have similar thickness to cast iron but steel is of course denser. Can't wait to try it out!

-AJ