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stevenn21
09-20-2011, 12:03 PM
hi guys i live in the uk i have a budget of $300 per knife i would like a set of knives

let me tell you a bit about me first.
i am a weekend home cook i dont make sushi and i want some well known good japenese knives



i really like the Hattori FH series at jck please read my other thread at

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/showtopic.php?tid/914468/tp/1/

but i need to know are the jck Hattori FH series good knives?
i like the look of them they look japanese lol

any suggestions on better knives for the same price they should look nice too:wink:

apparently its not a good idea to buy in europe so usa and japanese sites would be great only sites you have used or recommend though
oh and i want bragging rights too.
thanks guys

tk59
09-20-2011, 12:35 PM
If you're going for a "set," I'm assuming you are thinking chef's knife, slicer, paring and serrated bread knife. That's four knives at $300 each which makes your budget at least $1200. The last is pretty much going to be inexpensive (Tojiro ITK from (you'll have to google that) or MAC from anywhere). A nice 120/150 mm petty (paring) knife is going to run you no more than about $200 unless you're going for something custom, maybe. That leaves over $900 for a 270+mm sujihiki (slicer) and a 240 mm gyuto (chef's). Now you need to tell us what your priorities are. There are going to be trade-offs as long as your "set" stays under 20 knives or so, lol.

Stainless or not? Cute or not? In a hurry or not? Rocker or pusher (Although I expect you are willing to modify the way you cut to maximize performance.)? Light and a little wimpy-feeling or heavier and clumsier? I'm also assuming you want wa-handles since you want them to "look" Japanese.

I would suggest "talking" to Jon Broida at Japanese Knife Imports, at some point.

stevenn21
09-20-2011, 12:56 PM
If you're going for a "set," I'm assuming you are thinking chef's knife, slicer, paring and serrated bread knife. That's four knives at $300 each which makes your budget at least $1200. The last is pretty much going to be inexpensive (Tojiro ITK from ************** or MAC from anywhere). A nice 120/150 mm petty (paring) knife is going to run you no more than about $200 unless you're going for something custom, maybe. That leaves over $900 for a 270+mm sujihiki (slicer) and a 240 mm gyuto (chef's). Now you need to tell us what your priorities are. There are going to be trade-offs as long as your "set" stays under 20 knives or so, lol.

Stainless or not? Cute or not? In a hurry or not? Rocker or pusher (Although I expect you are willing to modify the way you cut to maximize performance.)? Light and a little wimpy-feeling or heavier and clumsier? I'm also assuming you want wa-handles since you want them to "look" Japanese.

stainless please no carbon
hi when i say set i dont mean buy them all at once i mean buy 1 for $300 save up then buy the second knife ect ect i dont have the money to pay for them all at once.

i like the jck fh series because they have really nice handles and the blades look japenese style look:

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/JCKHattoriForums.html

i will want to buy most of theese knives but some of them come in a number os sizes and im not sure which size to get example:

Petty 120mm or 150mm
Gyuto 210mm 240mm or 270mm
Western Deba 165mm or 240mm
Sujihiki 230mm 270mm or 300mm

stainless ,cute, in a hurry rocker or pusher? pusher i think,Light and a little wimpy-feeling or heavier and clumsier? i dont want ultra thin knives as im not a sushi chef
I'm also assuming you want wa-handles since you want them to "look" Japanese. no i want the type of handles on the jck fh series because they look modern classy and stylish

James
09-20-2011, 01:12 PM
Carbonext gyuto+petty and a king combination stone = ~ $260

You should also check out JKI's gesshin ginga; but Jon can't ship for another 3 weeks or so

tk59
09-20-2011, 01:20 PM
You want a western handle with a relatively flat profile in stainless. FYI, traditional sushi knives are certainly nothing resembling "thin." It is fairly common for sushi guys to use a thin sujihiki instead of the traditional ones. That said, thinner knives are more efficient cutters. With regard to the Hattori FH series, they are definitely for rockers as opposed to pushers and the handle is probably the best part about that knife. Unfortunately, the handle really only matters if you spend a lot of time using a knife. They are good knives but for $300 a pop, you can do much, much better in terms of performance. I'd probably start with a 240 mm gyuto in the Ashi-Gesshin Ginga line from JKI even though they are pretty thin. They are so much better than the FH in every way I can think of.

tk59
09-20-2011, 01:21 PM
...but Jon can't ship for another 3 weeks or so 2 weeks

stevenn21
09-20-2011, 01:30 PM
You want a western handle with a relatively flat profile in stainless. FYI, traditional sushi knives are certainly nothing resembling "thin." It is fairly common for sushi guys to use a thin sujihiki instead of the traditional ones. That said, thinner knives are more efficient cutters. With regard to the Hattori FH series, they are definitely for rockers as opposed to pushers and the handle is probably the best part about that knife. Unfortunately, the handle really only matters if you spend a lot of time using a knife. They are good knives but for $300 a pop, you can do much, much better in terms of performance. I'd probably start with a 240 mm gyuto in the Ashi-Gesshin Ginga line from JKI even though they are pretty thin. They are so much better than the FH in every way I can think of.

thanks for the info tk59 but i went on that sit just now and all the Ashi-Gesshin Ginga knives are out of stock

stevenn21
09-20-2011, 01:36 PM
i only wanted a set so they all matched but if i can get better performance from mix and matching i will do that but there are so many diffrent knives and styles i dont know where to start with a set you can just buy the knives in that set

stevenn21
09-20-2011, 02:04 PM
Ashi 240mm Stainless Western Style Gyuto i like it very very nice is it as good as the Ashi 240mm Stainless Wa-Gyuto or is it the same blade with a diffrent handle?

tk59
09-20-2011, 02:39 PM
Same thing with a different handle. The wa-handled ones run about 10 mm short measuring on the edge. Those labeled "ginga" or "Gesshin" are left a bit harder which might help in terms of edge retention depending on how you use the knives. They are also a little better finished in terms or rounding the non-cutting edges on the blade.

stevenn21
09-20-2011, 02:49 PM
so if i bought all my knives from the Ashi-Gesshin Ginga line would that be one of the best choices or should i just get the one you suggested and mix and match it with other brands

tk59
09-20-2011, 03:00 PM
This line is definitely one of the best, esp in stainless but a lot has to do with your preferences and how much you hang around this forum, lol. If you want a bread knife, I don't think they make one. I think you should get the one knife and use it and decide if you want your next one to be thin like that or less so. Regardless, I think you'll be happy with this line.

Eamon Burke
09-20-2011, 06:06 PM
If you want the knives to match, you can always have them rehandled. Then you will have a set of knives you love to use and all match, and they'll be all your own.

If you want bragging rights, an amazing knives, and Japanese authenticity, get a 240mm Shigefusa gyuto. I've never heard a bad thing about them.

Keep in mind that one great knife will replace an entire block.

Eamon Burke
09-20-2011, 06:07 PM
Nice to have you by the way!

Andrew H
09-20-2011, 06:23 PM
If you want the knives to match, you can always have them rehandled. Then you will have a set of knives you love to use and all match, and they'll be all your own.

If you want bragging rights, an amazing knives, and Japanese authenticity, get a 240mm Shigefusa gyuto. I've never heard a bad thing about them.

Keep in mind that one great knife will replace an entire block.

*Cough* reactivity *cough*

Eamon Burke
09-20-2011, 06:25 PM
Reactivity on the Kasumi version? I thought it was just the Damascus?

I should also add that Dr. Naka is experimenting on the "boiling water bath" for that...and I can't imagine it's too reactive to use.

tk59
09-20-2011, 07:11 PM
Did you even bother to read the OP's posts? He wants stainless.

stevenStefano
09-20-2011, 07:34 PM
A little pointer to everyone, the OP is from the UK therefore I originally recommended the FH and buying from JCK due to the cheaper shipping.

JBroida
09-20-2011, 07:51 PM
maybe this thread would get a little better response in the main area, but for the most part i think what people are saying makes sense... shippinng to the UK can be on the expensive side, so that is never fun but usually we do our best to condense and get as much out of one shipment as possible.

Anyways, to the OP, if you have questions that you would like me to answer, feel free to shoot me an e-mail... i'm in japan until october 2nd (meeting with the makers we work with... in fact, i'm going to be meeting with Ashi-san in about 1 hour), but i am still checking e-mails and returning phonecalls to the best of my ability (e-mail is currently the best way to reach me though).

Eamon Burke
09-20-2011, 08:00 PM
Did you even bother to read the OP's posts? He wants stainless.

Stainless shmainless. :razz:

Timthebeaver
09-20-2011, 08:22 PM
If you're in the UK I'd consider Bluewayjapan on ebay

Sakai Yusuke Swedish Stainless (Yo-handle)

http://bit.ly/o8BeED

Your choice of JCK is also a good one. I haven't seen much bad stuff written about the FH series, they are supposed to be good VG-10 knives. Hiromoto G3 (highly regarded steel) is another good option if you want a matching set, considerably less expensive than the Hattori

EdipisReks
09-20-2011, 10:10 PM
With regard to the Hattori FH series, they are definitely for rockers as opposed to pushers

i don't agree; i push cut with mine all day long. nice flat sweet spot about midway, on mine (that nice flat sweet spot may have had a bit of encouragement, admittedly, but it works just fine for push cutting out of the box). i use it no differently than my Shigefusa, Yoshikane or Mizuno gyutos. definitely a great knife, and the only stainless gyuto, and only yo handled gyuto, that i've kept.

tk59
09-20-2011, 10:40 PM
Okay. So the truth of the matter is, you can push cut with anything. However, this knife has more curve to the profile than anything else I've seen outside of Shun. As for being a "great knife," I suppose that is relative. It sharpens well, esp considering it is VG10. The edge retention is decent but not outstanding. The fit and finish is very good especially the handle but the edges aren't rounded on the spine and choil and the tip isn't particularly well ground. It doesn't feel "fast" or precise and it isn't thin behind the edge either. I can't think of one thing this knife has over something like an Ashi or TKC other than a handle that is nicer but not really all that significant in terms of performance unless you're a pro. When I was using the knife, all I wanted to do was put it down and pick up another one. In my opinion, it is a good knife, even for the price, assuming that particular handle is important to you but there is nothing great about the blade.

EdipisReks
09-20-2011, 11:05 PM
the ergonomics are great (the unbroken spine edges mean nothing to me, so maybe i'm weird), so i think the knife is great. the handle doesn't even mean that much to me, as i pinch knives very aggressively, but the FH feels very right, to me. it has held its edge very well for me, and i think it's reasonably thin behind the edge. i think it feels quite nimble compared to my Shigefusa and Yoshikane. i've never found a rounded profile to be all that much of an impediment to good cutting. if your technique is there, it doesn't matter, and i'm by no means the world's greatest knife user. it's a knife that one can take pride in, and it's a good knife to learn fundamentals on.