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Citizen Snips
09-22-2011, 11:35 PM
hey all,

just had my wife steal this from her boss so we could sharpen/de-rust it for him for his coming birthday. this knife is no prize as it wasn't cared for as well as it should have been. there is some rust, the handle looks like it was a d shape at one time based on the furrle and it also looks like someone put it to a grinder and made a new edge. it looks like its going to take some work. im not even sure if i can do it. its going to be hell on my stones and i just hope the back is concave for correct sharpening.

it would be great if anyone knew recognized the kanji so i could find out the maker.

thanks in advance

http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/IMG_20110922_223449.jpg
http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/IMG_20110922_223442.jpg

Andrew H
09-23-2011, 12:10 AM
Ahhhh! Look at that edge :sad0:

Citizen Snips
09-23-2011, 12:14 AM
ya, as a bonus i just cut the dickens out of my index finger trying to grind the edges together with a dmt. its going to be hours of work and on top of that my finger is probably infected lol

DOH

Andrew H
09-23-2011, 12:16 AM
ya, as a bonus i just cut the dickens out of my index finger trying to grind the edges together with a dmt. its going to be hours of work and on top of that my finger is probably infected lol

DOH

Did you cut your finger on the DMT? I find it hard to believe that knife could cut anything...:pirate1:

Citizen Snips
09-23-2011, 12:19 AM
nope on the knife. i had the knife flat on its back on a 2x4 ive made into a sink bridge. i had the dmt using it like i would if i was flattening and it slipped so my finger went right into the knife...lesson learned. ive done some stupid stuff in my day but wow.

im thinking i may need a bench grinder or something

also hunt and peck typing is hard

Dave Martell
09-23-2011, 12:44 AM
And it's a lefty too - nice challenge for you right there. I bet it'll look great when it's all done though. Maybe you should work fast before the infection sets in. :)

memorael
09-23-2011, 01:43 AM
It doesn't look to bad... :razz:

JBroida
09-23-2011, 05:32 AM
maybe sakai masashige?

Citizen Snips
09-23-2011, 10:09 AM
it does say sakai japan on the back

i really want to get this thing back to its original state. its going to be a project thats for sure. i really dont have loads of hours to spend on the DMT so im gonna try to find a grinder to take care of the first part

UglyJoe
09-23-2011, 11:06 AM
Hey Snips, you want some inspiration? I'm sure you've seen the blog post that Dave made about a couple of his restorations - if not they are here (http://japaneseknifesharpening.blogspot.com/2009/11/couple-of-restorations.html) and here (http://japaneseknifesharpening.blogspot.com/2010/01/another-refurb.html), and they are inspiring. Also, So from Japan Tool has a fantastic discussion on restoring a yanagi and some other knives here (http://www.japan-tool.com/hamono/Knife_Polishing/Knife_Polishing.html) that should give you a lot of inspiration for this project going forward. Also, TK has a thread on here somewhere where he did the same thing you are beginning to do.

Good Luck!

Eamon Burke
09-23-2011, 04:16 PM
I'm sure you know, but be CAREFUL on that grinder, especially the tip. Those things can be pretty abrasion resistant and test your patience, but it is pretty thin metal and conducts well, a few seconds on a belt or wheel and it turns colors and you do this: :censored::censored::censored:

It really doesn't look a million miles away from a nice restoration. I love doing those. I wish I had it!

...Now I'm itching. Anyone got a rusted sushi knife?
:sofa:

Andrew H
09-23-2011, 04:17 PM
I'm sure you know, but be CAREFUL on that grinder, especially the tip. Those things can be pretty abrasion resistant and test your patience, but it is pretty thin metal and conducts well, a few seconds on a belt or wheel and it turns colors and you do this: :censored::censored::censored:

It really doesn't look a million miles away from a nice restoration. I love doing those. I wish I had it!

...Now I'm itching. Anyone got a rusted sushi knife?
:sofa:

You can get some sharpening scuffs out from one of my knives, hey - I'll even leave it soaking in water for a couple of days for ya.

Citizen Snips
09-23-2011, 08:23 PM
thanks for the kind words and links to the inspirational restorations guys

tbh, i was quite frustrated yesterday that after 1 hour of work on the DMT and what should have been a trip to the hospital, it didnt even look like i did anything to it.

i am back at it tonight but still dont own a grinder and thinking that i may have to find one to do this right. it would take so many man hours to get this done with the DMT and beston that i could get a second job and just buy him a new one...but i wouldn't have the piece of mind, experience, knowledge or pride.

olpappy
09-24-2011, 03:37 PM
Hard to imagine that the blade geometry would be so out of whack as to not respond to the DMT, unless whoever used a grinder before on it changed the geometry, or if the shape wasn't all that great to begin with from the factory. It would be a shame if you had to use a belt grinder, because the grinder will leave marks that will be a challenge to get out byhand anyway. Once you've used a grinder on it you will stillhave a major amount of work on coarse stones or DMT to remove the grinder marks you've put into the steel, and the knife will become thinner in the process.

Is your DMT the big XXC? I don't think you should buy a grinder if it's just for this one knife. See if any knifemakers or KKF members in your area has one, or maybe ask Dave just to do the grinder work and send it back to you for the stones.

I'd guess St Louis MO must have a quite a few knifemakers living there!

A search of the knifemaker's guild yielded these:

Daniel Chinnock
380 River Ridge Drive
Union, MO 63084
USA
314-276-6936
sueanddanc@cs.com
http://DanChinnock.com
Voting Member

Colin J. Cox
107 North Oxford Drive
Raymore, MO 64083
USA
(816) 322-1977
colin4knives@aol.com
http://colincoxknives.com
Voting Member
C

William C. Davis
1955 S. 1251 Road
El Dorado Springs, MO 64774
USA
(417) 876-1259
eversharp4u@wildblue.net
http://www.wcdavisknives.com
Voting Member

Don L Hanson lll
P. O. Box 13
Success, MO 65570-0013
USA
573-674-3045
info@sunfishforge.com
http://www.sunfishforge.com
Voting Member

Corbin Newcomb
628 Woodland Avenue
Moberly, MO 65270
USA
(660) 263-4639
Voting Member

olpappy
09-24-2011, 03:57 PM
Sorry time expired on editing my post.

If you are simply trying to make the front and back faces meet by grinding flat below the shinogi, and the shape of the blade still has a long way to go, I would suggest changing your strategy to making a hamaguriba shape below the shinogi, that way you can get the front and back faces to form an edge. Instead of applying pressure to the center of the blade road, you will do two separate processes: One applying pressure to the upper half of the blade road, to form a clean shinogi line. The second process consisting of passes applying pressure to the lower half of the blade road, to form the edge.

A long time ago on KF or FF there were some links posted to Suisin videos by TATATA about this, but they were in Japanese.....

zitangy
09-24-2011, 04:40 PM
ya, as a bonus i just cut the dickens out of my index finger trying to grind the edges together with a dmt. its going to be hours of work and on top of that my finger is probably infected lol

DOH

got to take care of that cut and not neglect it. Don't want that slurry or swarf to get into the wound . When we realize that a loss of a finger will make it difficult to do the normal things, then only we will take care of it.

with the finger out of action, it may be easier to use a 400 grit and 600 grit sandpaper, put it flat on the table with a backing and rub knife on it . For finer control, rub the sandpaper on it ( with a backing; I prefer hard rubber). As there is some light rust, WD 40 may speed it up.

And do tape up your finger ( iron oxides adn metal filings dont go too well with wounds) and keep it clean..

Have fun and a nice week-end

rgds...

Citizen Snips
09-24-2011, 08:23 PM
olpappy-wow, thanks for the research and well thought out strategy. one of the first things i thought of was the fact i would probably have to do hamaguri style eventually, the problem being that i still have to work the metal down evenly to even get to the point where i could do a hamaguri edge correctly. there is a knife sharpening company here that specializes in german cutlery and renting knives to local restaurants and i know one of the workers there pretty well. they have a water cooled wheel grinder and i was just going to head up there and see if they can get some of the job done and maybe even it out a bit. the 2+ hours ive done still dont look like ive made much of a dent in it. the real problem here is that im right handed and so this lefty knife is a completely new muscle memory. the good part about that is i may be able to have some hours logged into this to make double bevel sharpening easier on me in the future.

i think that the new primary edge someone put on this thing was probably around 40-45 degrees. this means i have a lot of metal to take off if i want it to get where i can start on my beston even. it is responding little by little but not in enough time where i can even fathom an end of the road.

i may look into some sandpaper if i dont feel like water cooled grinder is a safe bet and will ruin the integrity of the knife. im sure it was a decent knife as it has a concave backside and it looks to be, at least, decently forged so i feel like this challenge is going to be worth it.

i just wish i knew the maker for sure. Jon was the only one who even had a guess.

Citizen Snips
09-24-2011, 08:25 PM
got to take care of that cut and not neglect it. Don't want that slurry or swarf to get into the wound . When we realize that a loss of a finger will make it difficult to do the normal things, then only we will take care of it.

with the finger out of action, it may be easier to use a 400 grit and 600 grit sandpaper, put it flat on the table with a backing and rub knife on it . For finer control, rub the sandpaper on it ( with a backing; I prefer hard rubber). As there is some light rust, WD 40 may speed it up.

And do tape up your finger ( iron oxides adn metal filings dont go too well with wounds) and keep it clean..

Have fun and a nice week-end

rgds...

thanks for the tip on the sandpaper. it may be worth a shot.

as for the infection, i was just being a little sarcastic. after i got the bleeding stopped, i was able to clean it really well and get some anti-infectant in there and bandaged it really well. also being a professional chef, i had tons of finger cots laying around from previous injuries that were helpful in allowing me to continue some work on the knife in the past few days

SpikeC
09-24-2011, 08:46 PM
Sounds like an angle grinder job!

zitangy
09-24-2011, 10:16 PM
Just an additional thought.. don' t forget to touch up the handle. If they are not cracked, a light sanding, followed by mineral oil and then wax will work wonders on the handle! It will bring it to life! I use Howard's feed and wax as it has a combination of mineral oil, bees wax and also carnuba wax.

have fun

rgds dl

Citizen Snips
09-24-2011, 10:24 PM
i use mineral and orange oil with my apiarists extra bees wax. i do not prefer carnuba for handles or cutting boards but thanks for the tip. i was also thinking about getting him a new handle from marko or something if i can even get this thing back to glorious.

the 100 grit sandpaper seems to be doing a great job. ive had a few whiskys so im not going to try too much tonight and risk another cut but it will get some time tomorrow

Citizen Snips
09-25-2011, 05:08 PM
anyone have some suggestions to help polish up the other parts of the knife. i use BKF to remove rust but i think it will still need a little bit of polishing. i will need it to be super fine as im not really wanting to mess up the geometry of the knife especially the back side where it is concave.

EdipisReks
09-25-2011, 05:14 PM
Just an additional thought.. don' t forget to touch up the handle. If they are not cracked, a light sanding, followed by mineral oil and then wax will work wonders on the handle! It will bring it to life! I use Howard's feed and wax as it has a combination of mineral oil, bees wax and also carnuba wax.

have fun

rgds dl

i soak in mineral oil, then sand, then coat in my own beeswax/oil cutting board mix, then polish, then sand again, then coat in wax, then polish, then burnish. i find that this gives the longest lasting results.

Citizen Snips
09-25-2011, 05:47 PM
what do you use to polish EdipisReks and what sandpaper grit do you use??

that is super helpful as ive never had a knife that really needed that much handle work but i was also referring to the parts of the metal that will not see a stone such as the uri and above the shinogi (the secondary bevel?)

EdipisReks
09-25-2011, 09:44 PM
what do you use to polish EdipisReks and what sandpaper grit do you use??

that is super helpful as ive never had a knife that really needed that much handle work but i was also referring to the parts of the metal that will not see a stone such as the uri and above the shinogi (the secondary bevel?)

i use scraps of split-grain leather for polishing after waxing. i typically sand with 500 wet/dry for smoothing and taking out gouges and whatever fine paper i have lying around for the rest.

Citizen Snips
09-26-2011, 10:37 AM
well, i think im just about done. i will take a picture or two but what im bummed out about is that i didn't take a bunch of before pictures. this is my first attempt at a complete restoration so its not perfect but with the tools i had i feel as though i did pretty good

all in all it took probably 6 hours of my time, 1/8 cup of blood, and all the patience i have. i spent most of that time with the DMT XXC and 100 grit norton sandpaper with a rubber sander. most of the work i did came from having the knife on its back and working the bevels together. this took so much time because blending the bevels together had to be held at a certain angle or i would take off too much metal in other places. after i got that straightened out, the easy part was turning that into a hamaguri bevel by blending them together.

after i did all that work on the front bevel, i found that whoever did this to the knife also ground metal off the back side making it very difficult. i had to make a very small convex edge on the backside that i feel will work the back bevel without ruining the work that was put into the back side during the forging process. i really had to raise the angle from flat to about 3 degrees

next was the BKF with a champagne cork to remove all the rust and 200 and 600 grit sandpaper for the handle which i used mineral oil and orange oil on. the last thing i will do right before i give it to him is to get a good layer of my mineral oil/beeswax on it and let it sit overnight. i think ill give it to him tomorrow. i do wish i could get him a custom saya or new handle or both but we were on a limited budget and he is going to love it anyway.

i then ran it through a full set of stones to make the scratches come out easier and making it possible to use felt to polish the blade road. i used:
DMT XXC
beston 500
bester 1200
blue aoto 2k
suehiro rika 5k
arashiyama 6k
kitayama 8k
leather strop
CRO2 loaded felt

well, thanks for all your kind suggestions and support through what had to have been the most painful experience ive to date. now i wish i had another project to work on

:D

zitangy
09-26-2011, 10:57 AM
I am sure that the owners eyes will pop for as compared to its original condition.. a far cry...
I think you got the bug... ( to restore kitchen knives) .

rgds

UglyJoe
09-26-2011, 11:14 AM
well, i think im just about done. i will take a picture or two but what im bummed out about is that i didn't take a bunch of before pictures. this is my first attempt at a complete restoration so its not perfect but with the tools i had i feel as though i did pretty good

all in all it took probably 6 hours of my time, 1/8 cup of blood, and all the patience i have. i spent most of that time with the DMT XXC and 100 grit norton sandpaper with a rubber sander. most of the work i did came from having the knife on its back and working the bevels together. this took so much time because blending the bevels together had to be held at a certain angle or i would take off too much metal in other places. after i got that straightened out, the easy part was turning that into a hamaguri bevel by blending them together.

after i did all that work on the front bevel, i found that whoever did this to the knife also ground metal off the back side making it very difficult. i had to make a very small convex edge on the backside that i feel will work the back bevel without ruining the work that was put into the back side during the forging process. i really had to raise the angle from flat to about 3 degrees

next was the BKF with a champagne cork to remove all the rust and 200 and 600 grit sandpaper for the handle which i used mineral oil and orange oil on. the last thing i will do right before i give it to him is to get a good layer of my mineral oil/beeswax on it and let it sit overnight. i think ill give it to him tomorrow. i do wish i could get him a custom saya or new handle or both but we were on a limited budget and he is going to love it anyway.

i then ran it through a full set of stones to make the scratches come out easier and making it possible to use felt to polish the blade road. i used:
DMT XXC
beston 500
bester 1200
blue aoto 2k
suehiro rika 5k
arashiyama 6k
kitayama 8k
leather strop
CRO2 loaded felt

well, thanks for all your kind suggestions and support through what had to have been the most painful experience ive to date. now i wish i had another project to work on

:D

Congrats! Still... pics or you know...

Citizen Snips
09-26-2011, 11:15 AM
http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/Yanagi%20Restoration/103.jpg
http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/Yanagi%20Restoration/1052.jpg
http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/Yanagi%20Restoration/105.jpg
http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/Yanagi%20Restoration/1062.jpg
http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/Yanagi%20Restoration/1072.jpg
http://i993.photobucket.com/albums/af60/smoovismcgee/Cutlery/Yanagi%20Restoration/110.jpg

Citizen Snips
09-26-2011, 11:17 AM
any critiques, comments, concerns or suggestions are all welcomed

thanks for looking

Citizen Snips
09-26-2011, 11:25 AM
*double post

UglyJoe
09-26-2011, 03:11 PM
I've a question more so than a critique, and this might require Jon or Dave to answer. I've noticed both in a lot of peoples refurbs as well as in yanagis that haven't needed a refurb so much as have has just been used up after years of work the blade road near the tip no longer flows quite right, or at least not like it did when the knife was new. Is this just a function of using the knife up? Or should you pay careful attention to the tip area to try and "raise" the shinogi a little more in this area to keep the geometry of the knife closer to what it was when the knife was new?

To clarify, on your friend's knife - as well as most older yanagis I have seen - the blade road tapers from the heel to the tip, where as in a new knife the blade road tends to stay even and "flow" better through the tip region. The edge profile of the knife (at least from what I can see - I'm not what I would call an expert on yanagis) seems right, but the blade road itself seems to thin a little near the tip, which in my head means the knife is thicker at the tip than it would have been new. Is this something that is just natural from correct sharpening of the knife, or should I adjust the way I'm sharpening my knife to try and maintain the original shape, which I think would require more work in the tip area, particularly in the area of the shinogi itself?

Citizen Snips
09-26-2011, 04:37 PM
that is a good question and now something im trying to compare with my yanagi which is less than a year old. i honestly have no idea but i would imagine it has something to do with the thickness of the metal at the tip compared to the heel. if there is less steel it will probably affect the taper as it takes years of sharpening and grinding of the metal at the tip of the knife

this is where the experts will have to chime in...

olpappy
09-26-2011, 04:47 PM
Or should you pay careful attention to the tip area to try and "raise" the shinogi a little more in this area to keep the geometry of the knife closer to what it was when the knife was new?


That is exactly what is needed if you want to keep the tip shape unchanged as the knife wears down. You would need to remove more metal in the tip area if you want the blade road to look as it did on the new knife.

Now that would involve some extra work, and it is easy to see why perhaps people would not bother to do it if it is not affecting the useability of the knife in the short term. In the long term however failing to do this will distort the shape of the knife.

EdipisReks
09-26-2011, 05:14 PM
I've a question more so than a critique, and this might require Jon or Dave to answer. I've noticed both in a lot of peoples refurbs as well as in yanagis that haven't needed a refurb so much as have has just been used up after years of work the blade road near the tip no longer flows quite right, or at least not like it did when the knife was new. Is this just a function of using the knife up? Or should you pay careful attention to the tip area to try and "raise" the shinogi a little more in this area to keep the geometry of the knife closer to what it was when the knife was new?

To clarify, on your friend's knife - as well as most older yanagis I have seen - the blade road tapers from the heel to the tip, where as in a new knife the blade road tends to stay even and "flow" better through the tip region. The edge profile of the knife (at least from what I can see - I'm not what I would call an expert on yanagis) seems right, but the blade road itself seems to thin a little near the tip, which in my head means the knife is thicker at the tip than it would have been new. Is this something that is just natural from correct sharpening of the knife, or should I adjust the way I'm sharpening my knife to try and maintain the original shape, which I think would require more work in the tip area, particularly in the area of the shinogi itself?

while it's a huge improvement over how it was, my Mk I eyeball came to a similar conclusion. when i dropped mine (for the second time, the first time my yanagi suffered no damage) and chipped the tip, i had to do that. it was like 10 years of sharpening in one session.

Dave Martell
09-26-2011, 06:08 PM
IMO it's very important to maintain the height of the blade road grind from heal to tip as the knife is sharpened. If at all possible repairs should be made with this in mind and correct if necessary. I try to make every effort to fix this on each knife I sharpen but I've had a couple of major restoration jobs where it was impossible to fix as the steel just wasn't there to work with.

Citizen Snips
09-26-2011, 06:46 PM
IMO it's very important to maintain the height of the blade road grind from heal to tip as the knife is sharpened. If at all possible repairs should be made with this in mind and correct if necessary. I try to make every effort to fix this on each knife I sharpen but I've had a couple of major restoration jobs where it was impossible to fix as the steel just wasn't there to work with.

ya it was my first resto job and it was quite a hard one to start out with. as you can see its a little messed up in some places still but i feel as though the owner will be happy with the work it got. i could probably spend another 10 hours and still have work to do but like i said in previous posts, spending all that time could just get him a new knife. i know he will be happy and for me it was just a starting stone to restorations that a lot of people have been asking me about.

Dave Martell
09-26-2011, 06:49 PM
ya it was my first resto job and it was quite a hard one to start out with. as you can see its a little messed up in some places still but i feel as though the owner will be happy with the work it got. i could probably spend another 10 hours and still have work to do but like i said in previous posts, spending all that time could just get him a new knife. i know he will be happy and for me it was just a starting stone to restorations that a lot of people have been asking me about.

I think that you did a great job and that's especially true considering what you had to work with, the knife was shanked and you had no power tools, again great job! :)

EdipisReks
09-26-2011, 06:57 PM
ya it was my first resto job and it was quite a hard one to start out with. as you can see its a little messed up in some places still but i feel as though the owner will be happy with the work it got. i could probably spend another 10 hours and still have work to do but like i said in previous posts, spending all that time could just get him a new knife. i know he will be happy and for me it was just a starting stone to restorations that a lot of people have been asking me about.

i just want to reiterate that it's a huge, huge improvement. you should be really proud.

wenus2
09-26-2011, 07:09 PM
Indeed, he will surely be stoked.
Plus it's good to practice on other people's crap. It's a win-win situation.
Nicely done sir.

Citizen Snips
09-26-2011, 11:50 PM
thanks guys. i just wish i could keep it for a souvenir but that is selfish. im glad it will be going into the hands of someone that will really appreciate the work and time it took and on top of that, bring a knife that was unused back to life.

i really do appreciate the help on this one. without the kind words of encouragement, i would probably have given up.

Eamon Burke
10-04-2011, 09:42 PM
Hey well done!
:hatsoff:

vinchan
10-05-2011, 12:43 AM
Nicely done.... Great effort....
I tried to search for you and i found it is http://www.sakai-tohji.co.jp/
堺刀司 正重作
You can copy and paste to google it if you want to
If anybody would like me to type the Chinese Kanji on knife...
i can try to type for you

memorael
10-05-2011, 03:16 AM
Oh yeah, that is a nice job there son. Congrats! I know the owners are going to be pleased. I like how shiny the bevel is.:thumbsup:

Citizen Snips
10-05-2011, 11:09 AM
he got it back a few days ago and actually cried. this knife was given to him by a famous chef whom i cannot remember the name, but it was like 5 years old when he received it. bringing it back to life actually brought tears to his eyes and gave me an incredible feeling of accomplishment. im so glad i was able to do something like that for someone who really really appreciates it. i told him i would find him no matter where he was if he ever let the knife get like that before. i also told him that work comes with a free lifetime sharpening. i will be glad to get my hands back on it and i dont want it to get sharpened by someone that doesn't know what they are doing.

thanks again for the kind words guys

Dave Martell
10-05-2011, 11:25 AM
he got it back a few days ago and actually cried. this knife was given to him by a famous chef whom i cannot remember the name, but it was like 5 years old when he received it. bringing it back to life actually brought tears to his eyes and gave me an incredible feeling of accomplishment.


Awesome! :cool2:

G-rat
10-05-2011, 11:30 AM
That is so great man! Well done!

memorael
10-05-2011, 04:58 PM
Wow, that is a true accomplishment there dude. Congrats.

Eamon Burke
10-05-2011, 05:05 PM
Wow!! That's rad.

Seb
10-05-2011, 10:29 PM
That's what it's all about! :D

Citizen Snips
10-06-2011, 01:30 AM
Nicely done.... Great effort....
I tried to search for you and i found it is http://www.sakai-tohji.co.jp/
堺刀司 正重作
You can copy and paste to google it if you want to
If anybody would like me to type the Chinese Kanji on knife...
i can try to type for you

well found, i think this is actually it. some expensive knives here. he said it was given to him in the mid 1980's so im sure its 25-30 years old

allumirati
10-06-2011, 01:56 AM
Dave, how do you restore the hollow on a single bevel knife?

Dave Martell
10-06-2011, 11:45 AM
Dave, how do you restore the hollow on a single bevel knife?

One of two things happen when I do this....

1. I use convexed platens & it comes out nice.

2. I use convexed platens & I screw the pooch.


The convex platens work nicely but I've found that you need more than one size and you can't grind straight (90 deg to platen length) across. You have to approach the platen from several angles to match up how this was done on the large wheels in Japan. The hollow looks simply ground but it's anything but that.

allumirati
10-06-2011, 10:50 PM
>>>

allumirati
10-06-2011, 10:51 PM
One of two things happen when I do this....

1. I use convexed platens & it comes out nice.

2. I use convexed platens & I screw the pooch.


The convex platens work nicely but I've found that you need more than one size and you can't grind straight (90 deg to platen length) across. You have to approach the platen from several angles to match up how this was done on the large wheels in Japan. The hollow looks simply ground but it's anything but that.

That's what I figured. So more or less angle to the platen toward the tip? Also:

1. where do you get convexed platen?
2. What grit do you use to grind?
3. Do you use scotchbrite belts to clean up?
4. How far can you grind until you hit soft cladding?
5. Can you make a video?
6. Are you going to make yanagi? :idea2:

Dave Martell
10-07-2011, 12:42 AM
That's what I figured. So more or less angle to the platen toward the tip? Also:

1. where do you get convexed platen?
2. What grit do you use to grind?
3. Do you use scotchbrite belts to clean up?
4. How far can you grind until you hit soft cladding?
5. Can you make a video?
6. Are you going to make yanagi? :idea2:


Yes you approach the platen on an ever increasing angle of attack as you approach the tip.


1. I made the first one from (ahem) a sanding block. The second two are A2 (I believe) and were purchased from a machinist/knifemaker over on BF who made them in 3' & 4' radius(s).

2. This depends but it's best to play it safe and use a smooth running slow cutting belt, turn the grinder down low, and take your time here.

3. Yup

4. I haven't hit this yet....

5. Nope :p

6. I hope not but I shouldn't say never.