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View Full Version : Konosuke HD or White #2?



macmiddlebrooks
10-05-2011, 01:52 PM
I'm in the market for a new 270mm gyuto and having a hard time deciding between the HD and the White #2 from Konosuke. Both with ebony wa-handles (HD is around $45 more). This will be my first non-western handled knife and potentially my first carbon blade. It is to be used at work with plenty of time to wipe it down after I use it (I work in a upscale natural market, so it's all basically prep.). Any thoughts?

Rottman
10-05-2011, 02:40 PM
I have a Konosuke white 270 gyuto. Great knife, wicked edge etc. What are you going to cut with it? If it is a lot of acidic stuff/fruits I'd go with a HD to be on the safe side (just one homecook's opinion).

aaronsgibson
10-05-2011, 02:40 PM
Well speaking for the Kono white #2, it's a hell of a knife. Very light and and very thin, it also takes a very good edge. Retention is good I can get a good two days out of my edge when I prep at work (also includes use at home some night, but that is polished up to 12K then stropped) It will take a patina rather fast. Mine had a full patina after about a day and a half. I do own a Kikuichi TKC 240 which is semi. That takes a very good edge and keeps it well. Others should comment for the HD which I hear is a great knife in its own. Hope this helps.

Cadillac J
10-05-2011, 03:09 PM
I have the 270 gyuto in white#2(and 300 wuji) as well as a 270 HD suji. Both are truly fantastic, and you will be thrilled either way...no doubt about it. I used to be a carbon-only guy, but I'm starting to favor semi-stainless steels nowadays because the edges don't corrode as quickly in regards to acidity and they can take almost as good of an edge as the white#2--so I say go with the HD in that respect.

However, because you don't have a carbon knife yet, the white#2 might be a better choice so that you can experience it all...used to be my favorite steel. In fact, I just sharpened my 270 gyuto last night (i've been planning on selling it) for the first time in a while, and I've found a completely new love for it again...I think my sujis will be on the back burner for a bit while I play with this.

It really is a toss up.

NO ChoP!
10-05-2011, 03:15 PM
I favor the HD for a gyuto or petty; carbon for sujihikis....

macmiddlebrooks
10-05-2011, 04:37 PM
Great replies, thanks guys. Part of me really wants to experience the carbon edge. A few other considerations:
-This knife will see lengthy runs of board time
- I have a relatively fine "classic/sapphire" Dickoron hone that I use pretty much before every session (works well with my Ginga Gesshin).
Will the carbon (harder heat treat?) respond ok to the hone vs. the HD which I assume should be fine?

memorael
10-05-2011, 04:42 PM
I would go with something stainless for fruits and veggies all day everyday type work. I don't know about the steeling part... usually I would just retouch my knife on a 6k and 10k everyday. Keeps the muscle memory and knife sharp.

macmiddlebrooks
10-05-2011, 04:52 PM
I would go with something stainless for fruits and veggies all day everyday type work. I don't know about the steeling part... usually I would just retouch my knife on a 6k and 10k everyday. Keeps the muscle memory and knife sharp.

I do have a Shapton 8000 that I use last in sharpening, so I could use it to hone. I've just always used a honing rod at work. I'll give the stone a try on Fri, thanks for the tip ;)

NO ChoP!
10-05-2011, 04:56 PM
I use my HD for days on end without touching stones; a quick couple minutes on a 5000k gets her whistling!

For extended board use, again I suggest the HD over the carbon....

Citizen Snips
10-05-2011, 04:57 PM
I favor the HD for a gyuto or petty; carbon for sujihikis....

may i ask why??

i agree with you for the gyuto and suji, but im still taking a good long look at the steel for my petty. im going to have a suji and petty set custom made for me and would like as many opinions as possible for my projects

memorael
10-05-2011, 05:46 PM
I do have a Shapton 8000 that I use last in sharpening, so I could use it to hone. I've just always used a honing rod at work. I'll give the stone a try on Fri, thanks for the tip ;)

Yeah this is in my opinion the best way to keep your knives sharp, it also has the added benefit that the refinement of the edge is superior (IMO) than doing the whole stone thing since the scratches are smaller than what you would usually put the knife edge doesn't stress as much and I feel you get a better edge off the constant refinement rather than the once dull sharpen all over method.

@Citizen Snips, I too would favor for all around use something stainless, if you are going to use it on fruits or delicate flavored stuff constantly. The reason is that carbon even with a patina will stain some fruits and give it some smell. Sometimes it isn't exactly the most perceptible smell but its there; on meats, onions, carrots, celery and stuff you will be using right away (even some fruit) carbon is the way to go. This is just my opinion so take it with a grain of salt.

One story about carbon tragedies is that while working at my prior restaurant, I fine diced about a pound of shallots with a well patinad (how do you spell that ???) gyuto and stored them for about 4 hours... bad choice when I pulled them out they were all grey, the look on other people was like ***??? I was like what happened??? never used a carbon knife there again except for proteins. INOX is the way to go in that sense.

Citizen Snips
10-05-2011, 06:53 PM
memo-i agree with what you are saying but i think you are assuming that the petty will be used as an all around knife. i have all carbon in a professional environment with the exception of my all around knife (HD 270mm gyuto) and i think carbon is almost always the way to go. as far as leaving smell/coloring, i think it depends on the carbon itself. i have seen a kikuichi that after patina was added, never emitted smell or stained anything. i also have owned a misono swedish suji that stained and emitted smell no matter how much or little patina was on it.

tk59
10-05-2011, 09:03 PM
I have a Konosuke white 270 gyuto. Great knife, wicked edge etc. What are you going to cut with it? If it is a lot of acidic stuff/fruits I'd go with a HD to be on the safe side (just one homecook's opinion).

+1. If it's an all arounder and you cut a fair amount of acidic materials, I'd go with the HD. If you're not doing a whole lot of acid, then the white 2 would be a better choice, perhaps. You shouldn't have much problem with stinkage, if any as long as you wipe as soon as you finish cutting things like onions, etc. Dedicated slicers should pretty much be non-stainless imo.

Seb
10-05-2011, 09:21 PM
On the one hand, semi-stainless steels are the best of both worlds.

On the other hand, the greater sharpness and ease of sharpening of Hitachi White #2 carbon just has to be experienced at least once. Semi-stainless is close but there is a difference.

NO ChoP!
10-06-2011, 01:45 AM
may i ask why??

i agree with you for the gyuto and suji, but im still taking a good long look at the steel for my petty. im going to have a suji and petty set custom made for me and would like as many opinions as possible for my projects

Well, I use a 210mm petty (Kono HD) for a line knife, cutting mostly seared and grilled proteins during service; and during service, I'm not always meticulous with blade cleanliness. I was using a carbon Masamoto for a while, but found the edge deteriorated quickly with the crusty protein slicing, and constant contact with blood and juices.....