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View Full Version : Cheap way to get rid of scratches on knife?



slowtyper
10-05-2011, 04:42 PM
I have a lot of time on my hands now...I'd like to get rid of some scuff marks from my not-so-good-sharpening.

Now "a lot of time on my hands" also means "not much money to spend". What are the most cost-effective ways of doing this? Also say if money wasn't a concern...what would you use?

Vertigo
10-05-2011, 04:46 PM
Can't go wrong with progressive grits of wet/dry sandpaper and a soft sanding block to help maintain the contours of your grind. If money was no concern... I'd have someone else do it.

slowtyper
10-05-2011, 04:59 PM
Whats the difference between wet/dry sandpaper? Just how you use it or is there a difference in the actual product?

And what grits would you use?

Sorry for the dumb questions I don't do much of this stuff

memorael
10-05-2011, 05:02 PM
Can't go wrong with progressive grits of wet/dry sandpaper and a soft sanding block to help maintain the contours of your grind. If money was no concern... I'd have someone else do it.

I agree, I would buy several types since the best looking IMO leaves a finish similar to the DMT plates, some leave a matte finish and that may be your thing so experiment. Wet/Dry just means that wet can get wet and not fall apart, usually the grit is better bonded too. The regular type once wet starts loosing grit fast. I think emery is the finish I like the best.

Eamon Burke
10-05-2011, 05:03 PM
It's easier to find higher grits of wet/dry and the paper lasts longer. Plus it puts up with being lubricated, which is a real plus when polishing. You can use 3M Wet/Dry up to ~800grit with a little mineral oil and strokes all in the same direction and make a nice haze. Or you can get up to 2500grit and polish it like a mirror, which I don't recommend.

Vertigo
10-05-2011, 05:09 PM
Whats the difference between wet/dry sandpaper? Just how you use it or is there a difference in the actual product?

And what grits would you use?

Sorry for the dumb questions I don't do much of this stuff

Some sandpapers not specifically marked as "wet" or waterproof use bonding agents which dissolve in water. I really don't think water or other lubrication is totally necessary for working on knives, but I like that it keeps the various particulates from going airborne (which means I don't need to wear a mask when working on a knife for a few hours).

What grit you start at depends on how deep the scratches you'll be working on are. When I polish a house knife from work, that's completely bunged up from years of abuse, I start at #120. For my own knives, usually #400 or so.

Benuser
10-05-2011, 05:21 PM
Sandpaper uses to wear or soften quite quickly. So you may use the used 240-paper to get a smooth finish. You may add some stone mud and vary with different stones...
Be sure to keep a respectable distance to the edge, or you will have to build it up entirely.

slowtyper
10-05-2011, 06:16 PM
Thanks all. I assume since each grit leaves a different finish, I have to sand down the entire knife to get it to look even, can't just do a small affected section?

Benuser
10-05-2011, 06:41 PM
Exactly, but once you've found a good mix of sandpaper, mud, pressure, and forget about a polished but sticking blade, you will be very happy!

Delbert Ealy
10-05-2011, 07:23 PM
I would start with some 3m wet/dry 400grit and a can of wd-40 or other lube. back with a solid block and use a good back and forth motion until your scratches are gone. To even up the scratch pattern start with a new piece of sandpaper and fresh lube and starting at the bolster use smooth even strokes all the way to the tip.
You should be able to do this in less than an hour for the whole knife.
Del

Small can of wd-40 $2
4 sheets of sandpaper $4
Total $6

Seb
10-05-2011, 08:33 PM
I couldn't be bothered with sandpaper so I just laid the knife flat on my Chocera 400 and went for it - took less than a minute:


http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h190/aurochs_2006/ThinnedYuke001.jpg

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h190/aurochs_2006/ThinnedYuke002.jpg

Eamon Burke
10-05-2011, 09:18 PM
While viable for the enterprising knifenut, you have to be careful when doing it ^that^ way, because you can easily bust up some nice face bevels that were blended at the shop by the guy who made it. Not for the newbies, I'd say.

Your fingers behind sandpaper just buff up what is there.

karloevaristo
10-06-2011, 12:11 AM
sandpaper and micron films...

Chef Niloc
10-06-2011, 01:56 AM
You want this stuff
https://www.woodworkingshop.com/category.aspx?id=23&f5=SILICON+CARBIDE+WET%2fDRY

Silicon carbide paper will save you a lot of time! Money too as you won't need as many sheets. I like the kingspore brand of paper more so then 3M, might even be cheeper then 3M??