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JBroida
10-15-2011, 09:54 PM
For quite some time now, we have been working in the background to try to make some educational knife skills videos for people trying to learn how to use Japanese knives. We have teamed up with Tatsuya Aoki and Mitsunori Ueda to produce these videos and finally have a few that are ready for you. We will be adding in English notes or voiceovers to these videos as they are produced to make the skill sets more accessible to you.

If you have questions about specific knives, techniques, skills, etc., please donít hesitate to ask. We will do our best to respond to these requests with videos and/or detailed explanations.

Anyways, without any further delay, allow me to introduce Japanese Knife Society.

www.JapaneseKnifeSociety.com

http://www.facebook.com/JapaneseKnifeSociety

http://www.youtube.com/user/japaneseknifesociety

Japanese Knife Society Mission

Can you use Japanese knives?
Japanese knives, or Wa-bocho, have been increasing in popularity over the past few years. Wa-bocho are some of the sharpest knives in the world, however, there are so few professional chefs outside of Japan that understand the knivesí potential and how to properly use them.

Japanese Knife Society (JKS) is an educationally oriented society. Working through the skill and experience of Chef Mitsunori Ueda, JKS aims to teach people about the different styles of Wa-bocho, how to use them, how to care for them, and what makes them special.

JKS hopes to positively contribute to the education of aspiring chefs, experienced chefs, and interested home cooks alike, through educational literature, pictures, blogs, videos, and events. Through JKS gears its educational material towards working chefs, it will be assessable to anyone with an interest in learning about Wa-bocho.


And now some videos:

First up, Ueda-san demonstrates how to break down Fugu (the type of fugu in this video is torafugu):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JmCzfeiqjj4

Here, Ueda-san shows how to use a Kamagata usuba to cut long onions (and chives for that matter):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaEYZZapaTs

And, in this last video, Ueda-san covers some of the basics of katsuramuki, using a cucumber and yanagiba (he used a yanagiba despite the fact that the proper knife is an usuba or kamagata usuba... he explained that often times sushi chefs do this as a matter of convenience and he was just concerned with demonstrating the proper techniques here... he will do another video covering the same with an usuba):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEjt3608-pM

Eamon Burke
10-15-2011, 10:14 PM
This is very exciting!

obtuse
10-15-2011, 10:23 PM
Thank you!

MadMel
10-15-2011, 11:41 PM
Great!!

Darkhoek
10-16-2011, 03:58 AM
These videos are highly educational. I'll have Fugu for dinner tonight! :D

DarKHOeK

JBroida
10-16-2011, 11:59 AM
some people have asked about the fugu video... the fish is still moving after the first cut. But what you dont see is that the fish's spine has been severed and the fish is long since dead. The movements are all post mortum nerve twitches.

When he pulls the fish out of the tank, he severs the connection between the spine and the brain with his knife and also opens up the major arteries... the fish's heart continues to pump, helping to remove all of the blood from the body (the blood should not be eaten). Once all of that is done, then the fish is cut up (thats where this video begins).

markk
10-16-2011, 12:30 PM
these are great, thanks for setting this up

Citizen Snips
10-16-2011, 01:43 PM
this is a great idea and will prove to be invaluable for those looking to learn more about japanese cutlery techniques

GREAT STUFF!!!

heirkb
10-16-2011, 03:22 PM
This is really cool. Thanks for making the videos.

wenus2
10-16-2011, 04:48 PM
super awesome

bishamon
10-16-2011, 07:01 PM
Ya, I've seen fugu done up in a couple videos and once IRL. It's a super involved process, but I guess that's why you have to be certified.

JBroida
10-19-2011, 07:34 PM
Newest video... Katsuramuki with Carrots (also, Yokoken and Tateken cuts)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MT7PRopK08

This time, he uses the proper knife for katsuramuki... a kamagata usuba or usuba.

heirkb
10-20-2011, 06:15 PM
Nice. Thank you for posting, Jon. And thanks to Ueda san and the person filming for making the video.

obtuse
10-20-2011, 07:00 PM
That is a skill I want to learn

JBroida
11-04-2011, 03:19 PM
New Video... The movement of Yanagiba- Hirazukiri... hope you like it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_profilepage&v=CKnhOGc68YY

SpikeC
11-04-2011, 04:14 PM
Excellent piece of instruction Jon! What was he cutting?

JBroida
11-04-2011, 05:04 PM
konnyaku... if you read the entire video description (on youtube), i have english in there too

tk59
11-04-2011, 05:52 PM
I am really enjoying these videos! I need to get myself a nice yanagiba...

heirkb
11-04-2011, 06:18 PM
Thanks for another great video. Good to know about the konnyaku, too.

Does Ueda san prefer the Suisin Inox Honyaki knives for a particular reason?

JBroida
11-04-2011, 06:29 PM
yes... he likes them because of how easy they are to touch up, how they dont react with acidic foods, the added toughness they have, and the kind of edge feel they give. I know there are many "traditional" japanese chefs who would not do this, but I've stood next to Ueda-san and tested out a bunch of different knives/steels and i understand why he picks what he picks. It doesnt mean that they would be his choice for everything, as he also has a number of white and blue steel knives as well as ginsanko.

Also, we are working with Tatsuya-san from suisin on this project, so chances are we will use suisin knives in every video... though not always INOX honyaki... maybe densho will make an appearance soon ;)

Eamon Burke
11-04-2011, 07:19 PM
Another good one. Though I do feel that using a yanagiba in this manner is a lot more intuitive and natural than the previous videos.

JBroida
11-04-2011, 07:24 PM
i think the only other video with a yanagiba is the katsuramuki one, right? I told him that it would cause confusion, but he insisted that many sushi chefs do this out of convenience, so we should show it.

Anyways, we really tried to highlight some of the parts of this particular cut that many people miss... hopefully it came across in the video.

I'm curious if you guys are trying these techniques at home/work? If so, how are they working out for you? Better or worse? Let me know if you are running into problems or if you have technical questions.

Eamon Burke
11-04-2011, 08:43 PM
I meant that doing this with a yanagiba is more intuitive than katsuramuki in general, or the nuanced negi cut, because the specific use and tailored design of the yanagiba lends itself to this naturally.

I do exactly this stuff, both at work and home. When I was working sushi, I always did katsuramuki with my yanagiba. I never owned an usuba. Still don't...yet.

UglyJoe
11-04-2011, 11:16 PM
I'm slowly learning katsuramuki... not easy with a yanagi.

heirkb
11-05-2011, 01:26 AM
Thanks for the reply, Jon. I guess I'd have to learn to work with single beveled knives and try a few out to better understand that perspective. Hopefully I can start when I visit LA in the winter...

The hekler
11-05-2011, 01:52 AM
I think this video is the best yet, it's great how you incorporated so many different camera angles, it really helps give me an idea of how to mimic his movements. Thank you and please keep the videos coming.

Beau Nidle
11-05-2011, 08:36 AM
Fascinating, thanks for the videos Jon! it's good to see stuff that we read about actually being demonstrated so completely.

Sarge
11-06-2011, 02:44 AM
Yeah the videos are great and I practice all the things I see at work. I thought it was interesting the slight forward movement at the end of the cut very helpful. My cutting whether with single bevel or gyuto has really improved from watching these keep up the good work both of you.

JBroida
11-06-2011, 02:51 AM
technically there are 4 of us involved ;) but thanks (on behalf of all of us)... glad the videos are proving to be helpful

JBroida
11-07-2011, 05:19 PM
Today i got some notes from Ueda-san and Tatsuya-san about some things that needed to be highlighted in the video, so i added in some text this morning. If you havent watched this today, check it out again to catch the new points.

JBroida
01-13-2012, 05:58 PM
New video from JKI- Saba no Sanmai Oroshi

This was just uploaded, but we will be working on the English later today

Please let us know if you have any questions.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=NrBjgFfeo4A

Andrew H
01-13-2012, 06:01 PM
New video from JKI- Saba no Sanmai Oroshi

This was just uploaded, but we will be working on the English later today

Please let us know if you have any questions.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=NrBjgFfeo4A

Great video, very nice use of the toothbrush.

JBroida
01-13-2012, 06:17 PM
i always keep one in my kit

schanop
01-13-2012, 07:13 PM
Cool!!

JBroida
01-13-2012, 09:10 PM
English notes are up... there may be some changes while we discuss this with Ueda-san

bieniek
01-14-2012, 02:22 AM
shite, i just realized how badly in need of deba I am!!...

JBroida
01-14-2012, 03:40 PM
there was a problem with how some of the text showed up, so i just fixed that too...

anyone try this out for themselves yet?

bieniek
01-14-2012, 06:29 PM
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m310/carl00s/100_3134.jpg

Just with yanagi, as I dont see the point of owning any vegetable single bevel.

I tried with carrot for A it being more difficult than cucumber and B for lack of cucumbers.
Definitely to do it like Mr Ueda takes loads of practice, but I love how slow and particular he is. Just very nice to watch

JBroida
01-14-2012, 06:41 PM
he goes slow for the videos... i promise he works much faster in real life ;)

looks like your tried yoko-ken... is that right?

Eamon Burke
01-14-2012, 11:51 PM
:jawdrop:
What a beast! That guy is amazing.

For those who haven't tried, I promise that slashing thing on the spine where he pops through all the rib bones, takes the fish off the bones, and doesn't scratch the meat is not remotely as easy as he makes it look.

JBroida
01-15-2012, 12:08 AM
actually, its not that bad... its just an angle and wrist issue

here's one i did way out of practice:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZsuAmTq9WAw

Eamon Burke
01-15-2012, 12:14 AM
I dunno man, maybe because I never did it with a Deba. But that was something I never got great at. Sadly, 95% of sushi in Texas is rolling rolling rolling...cutting fish takes up like 5-8 hours out of the week for everyone put together at the bar I worked at(excluding tuna, of course, which comes in loins anyways).

bieniek
01-15-2012, 01:55 AM
Nope. Something called tateken. The carrot would stay dead straight, without will to roll :)

Liked the feeling fo cutting it with yanagiba, plenty of sharpness available and thickness of slice just up to your will

I meant it takes considerable time practicing and learning, not mentioning the chance of mistake under pressure, youve seen any chef with only half a thumb?
No wonder they start with washing rice for 5 years :D

Would he use bigger sized deba for bigger fish, like 20KG? or more?

JBroida
01-15-2012, 01:58 AM
Nope. Something called tateken. The carrot would stay dead straight, without will to roll :)

Liked the feeling fo cutting it with yanagiba, plenty of sharpness available and thickness of slice just up to your will

I meant it takes considerable time practicing and learning, not mentioning the chance of mistake under pressure, youve seen any chef with only half a thumb?
No wonder they start with washing rice for 5 years :D

Would he use bigger sized deba for bigger fish, like 20KG? or more?

usually his 180mm and 210mm get the most workout... from time to time he has a 240mm mioroshi he uses too. Though the last time we used that one was when he was showing me how to split fugu skin into layers.

bieniek
01-15-2012, 02:07 AM
So which would be better, 21 mioroshi or 21 deba? Strictly to break down fish?

JBroida
01-15-2012, 02:08 AM
deba

remember, mioroshi is a combo of yanagiba and deba. Works for both, but not as good as either.

Peco
01-15-2012, 01:58 PM
I need a deba!

schanop
01-17-2012, 08:51 AM
Chef Ueda is so cool http://youtu.be/Ox2wgKuV_X0 :hungry:

We can now see a bit more of his workspace, yay! And hirame is on the board today.

Justin0505
01-17-2012, 11:45 AM
Best.
Video.
Series.
EVER!

It makes me want to quit my job, sell everything I own (except knives) and go spend 5 years washing rice.

JBroida
01-17-2012, 01:41 PM
Yup... next video is Hirame no Gomai Oroshi (5 piece cutting of Fluke)... I'm going to try to get the english done for it today.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ox2wgKuV_X0

bieniek
01-17-2012, 03:32 PM
The video with blowfish is better... Can see just so much care about the fish there, if you could say that... :D

Justin0505
01-17-2012, 03:59 PM
The video with blowfish is better... Can see just so much care about the fish there, if you could say that... :D

The Fugu vid is very dramatic and more exotic in the way that it's broken down. I was particularly awed at how flawless and quickly he removed the skin.

However, Fluke is one of my favorite things to eat and I really enjoyed seeing how gently he handled the very delicate fish. Even the way that he removed it from the net and then killed it seemed very careful and respectful, if not almost loving.
-and the finished filets are just flawless: not so much as a fingerprint indent!

JBroida
01-17-2012, 09:04 PM
i thought i would be able to get english done for this video today, but it may be tomorrow... sorry for the delay

ecchef
01-18-2012, 06:24 AM
The Fugu vid is very dramatic and more exotic in the way that it's broken down. I was particularly awed at how flawless and quickly he removed the skin.

However, Fluke is one of my favorite things to eat and I really enjoyed seeing how gently he handled the very delicate fish. Even the way that he removed it from the net and then killed it seemed very careful and respectful, if not almost loving.
-and the finished filets are just flawless: not so much as a fingerprint indent!

The important part is the ike jime. Really make a difference in the final product.

Justin0505
01-18-2012, 01:13 PM
The important part is the ike jime. Really make a difference in the final product.

I had heard of the of concept before, but never knew the name or had seem it done.
Here's an interesting article about gulf fishing practices and a slowly growing movement to produce better grade fish through the adoption of ike jime
http://digitalissue.houstonpress.com/iphone/zoom.php?i=78228&pn=12#_m0

JBroida
01-19-2012, 06:51 PM
English notes are up... hope you guys find this helpful:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ox2wgKuV_X0

schanop
01-19-2012, 06:52 PM
Thank you berry much. Would a technique for Karei (facing right ones) be the same, but mirrored?

JBroida
01-28-2012, 12:28 AM
New Video from JKS- Hirazukuri and Sushi Netagiri of Maguro with a Yanagiba

The english notes are up already, so we hope you enjoy it.

Let us know if you have any questions.

Thanks.

The JKS Team


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=iCz2RkmtWYM

JBroida
01-28-2012, 12:29 AM
Thank you berry much. Would a technique for Karei (facing right ones) be the same, but mirrored?

Karei is a different kind of fish (the skin is even different), but the technique is the same. Both Hirame and Karei can be either right or left facing. Its still always hara-sei-sei-hara... belly, spine, spine, belly.

heirkb
01-28-2012, 01:53 AM
Jon, these videos are awesome. I can't wait till I get set up to try all these things out.

DwarvenChef
01-28-2012, 06:12 AM
Ok now I'm hungry... thanks :p

slowtyper
01-28-2012, 05:30 PM
The video with blowfish is better... Can see just so much care about the fish there, if you could say that... :D

What blowfish video? Is there a link?

slowtyper
01-28-2012, 05:38 PM
I like the last video. One question about cutting fish for sushi as shown in the second part of the video...

Do you maintain the same angle for the entire cut? One chef explained to me that he cuts it in a slight curve so each piece is slightly curved. I guess you can imagine that he cuts the fish to match the curve of the back of the yanagiba. (I'm not saying thats the amount of curve he uses, just to show you what direction of curve I am talking about).


Just wondering is this common?

JBroida
01-28-2012, 05:48 PM
The angle is maintained for the cut except at the end, where the angle is changed to create a nice edge

Mint427
01-28-2012, 07:05 PM
Very nice knife skills on the chives and cucumber - I really liked the view of placement of the chef's hands and grip on the knife. Thanks, Jon!

stereo.pete
04-11-2012, 11:24 AM
Jon,

Thanks again for sharing with us the knowledge of these videos. I've been watching them non-stop and it is quite amazing just how much finesse these guys have when it comes to filleting fish. They make it look so easy but I know from experience that it is not, just ask Scott after I "butchered" some salmon of his. I've also watched your sharpening single bevel video a few times as well, gearing myself up to sharpen my Yoshihiro.