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JBroida
10-16-2011, 12:26 AM
For quite some time now, we have been working in the background to try to make some educational knife skills videos for people trying to learn how to use Japanese knives. We have teamed up with Tatsuya Aoki and Mitsunori Ueda to produce these videos and finally have a few that are ready for you. We will be adding in English notes or voiceovers to these videos as they are produced to make the skill sets more accessible to you.

If you have questions about specific knives, techniques, skills, etc., please donít hesitate to ask. We will do our best to respond to these requests with videos and/or detailed explanations.

Anyways, without any further delay, allow me to introduce Japanese Knife Society.

www.JapaneseKnifeSociety.com

http://www.facebook.com/JapaneseKnifeSociety

http://www.youtube.com/user/japaneseknifesociety

Japanese Knife Society Mission

Can you use Japanese knives?
Japanese knives, or Wa-bocho, have been increasing in popularity over the past few years. Wa-bocho are some of the sharpest knives in the world, however, there are so few professional chefs outside of Japan that understand the knivesí potential and how to properly use them.

Japanese Knife Society (JKS) is an educationally oriented society. Working through the skill and experience of Chef Mitsunori Ueda, JKS aims to teach people about the different styles of Wa-bocho, how to use them, how to care for them, and what makes them special.

JKS hopes to positively contribute to the education of aspiring chefs, experienced chefs, and interested home cooks alike, through educational literature, pictures, blogs, videos, and events. Through JKS gears its educational material towards working chefs, it will be assessable to anyone with an interest in learning about Wa-bocho.


And now some videos:

First up, Ueda-san demonstrates how to break down Fugu (the type of fugu in this video is torafugu):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JmCzfeiqjj4

Here, Ueda-san shows how to use a Kamagata usuba to cut long onions (and chives for that matter):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaEYZZapaTs

And, in this last video, Ueda-san covers some of the basics of katsuramuki, using a cucumber and yanagiba (he used a yanagiba despite the fact that the proper knife is an usuba or kamagata usuba... he explained that often times sushi chefs do this as a matter of convenience and he was just concerned with demonstrating the proper techniques here... he will do another video covering the same with an usuba):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEjt3608-pM

macmiddlebrooks
10-16-2011, 01:27 AM
Great vids John, thanks for taking the time to do this.

JohnnyChance
10-16-2011, 01:44 AM
The title screen for the fugu and negi videos read "janese knife society".


Great videos. Camera work is great, really shows all the little intricacies of each technique. And the text points out things I wouldn't otherwise notice. And I like that the text bubbles rather than voice over preserve the original sound as well.

JBroida
10-16-2011, 01:47 AM
The title screen for the fugu video reads "janese knife society".


Great videos. Camera work is great, really shows all the little intricacies of each technique. And the text points out things I wouldn't otherwise notice. And I like that the text bubbles rather than voice over preserve the original sound as well.



lol... working with japanese guys... cant help it with the title. I'll let them know though. I'm glad the text bubbles worked out welll... i was trying to decide wheter voice or text would be better and ended up going with text. I realized toay that the text bubbles dont show up on the youtube mobile app though... kind of a small setback.


Anyways, are there any videos you guys would really like to see?

macmiddlebrooks
10-16-2011, 04:52 AM
Breaking down tuna or salmon would be nice. I have very little experience doing this.

DwarvenChef
10-16-2011, 07:16 AM
Second on the Salmon, if I get back to AK I will be doing alot if it lol.

Vladimir
10-16-2011, 08:47 AM
Great idea!
Will be useful for many people.

heirkb
10-16-2011, 03:31 PM
Anyways, are there any videos you guys would really like to see?

I'm with the others on salmon. There may be an itasan video already (can't remember), but one with descriptions would be really nice. The other things I'm really curious to see are the different cuts for making sashimi or sushi with different fish. So...how they cut the blocks of fish, how they slice the fish, and how those cuts differ for different fish.

stevenStefano
10-16-2011, 04:53 PM
Great videos. I second the idea of a video showing the different cuts for sushi. Many of the I have never seen before and I think it would be cool to see how different fish are cut in different ways depending on their texture

MadMel
10-17-2011, 11:54 AM
I'm with the others on salmon. There may be an itasan video already (can't remember), but one with descriptions would be really nice. The other things I'm really curious to see are the different cuts for making sashimi or sushi with different fish. So...how they cut the blocks of fish, how they slice the fish, and how those cuts differ for different fish.

I'm with you on showing if different cuts are used on different fishes and is so what are the effects.

JBroida
10-18-2011, 02:22 PM
Alright... so i see where you guys are coming from and i think we can get to that eventually... however, after talking it over, we feel its best to start from the basics and work from there. We want to focus on things like knife grips, proper stance, the basic skills with each type of knife, etc. Then, we will probably move more into the specialized stuff. Is that ok with you guys?

DwarvenChef
10-18-2011, 03:42 PM
I'm good :)

How about the differences in use between "similar" styles. Single bevel and double bevels slicers, ajikiris, and such

heirkb
10-18-2011, 05:01 PM
Alright... so i see where you guys are coming from and i think we can get to that eventually... however, after talking it over, we feel its best to start from the basics and work from there. We want to focus on things like knife grips, proper stance, the basic skills with each type of knife, etc. Then, we will probably move more into the specialized stuff. Is that ok with you guys?

Given that you know a lot more than I do (and lots of other guys here), this sounds great to me.

MadMel
10-18-2011, 11:27 PM
Given that you know a lot more than I do (and lots of other guys here), this sounds great to me.

+1

JBroida
10-19-2011, 07:33 PM
Newest video... Katsuramuki with Carrots (also, Yokoken and Tateken cuts)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MT7PRopK08

This time, he uses the proper knife for katsuramuki... a kamagata usuba or usuba.

mpukas
10-19-2011, 08:38 PM
Not seeing the vid, Jon.

JBroida
10-19-2011, 08:52 PM
weird... i see it

Anyone else not see it?

aaronsgibson
10-19-2011, 09:03 PM
Nope I can see it. Great skill.

GlassEye
10-19-2011, 09:40 PM
In the carrot katsuramuki video, would he normally continue the katsuramuki farther, but stops early to keep the video short? Or, is the rest of the carrot just normally used for other things?

JBroida
10-19-2011, 10:01 PM
great question... he stops early just for the video... you can go much more with it. However, that carrot can be used for other things in that condition.

It would be pretty boring to watch him do the whole carrot for a video like this... he's going pretty slow to make sure the techniques are easy to see

apicius9
10-19-2011, 10:40 PM
Great, thanks Jon. I used to be a member of the Scotch Malt Whiskey Society, but this may almost be as good :)

Stefan

UglyJoe
10-19-2011, 10:57 PM
Jon, I've watched these videos a few time now and I am confused (a LOT) about the knives he is using. They are all Inox honyako knives, right? I swear all of the knives look like they are laminated... there is clearly a contrast between the metal toward the upper half of the blade road and the lower half of the blade road. But the Inox honyaki knives are monosteel, so I don't understand what is going on. Is this just an artifact of the way he sharpens the knives?

JBroida
10-19-2011, 11:01 PM
yeah they are all inox honyaki... they are sharpened intentionally to look like kasumi knives... it was done just for fun

UglyJoe
10-19-2011, 11:06 PM
Okay, well that leads to the next obvious question... How was that pulled off???

EdipisReks
10-19-2011, 11:21 PM
Okay, well that leads to the next obvious question... How was that pulled off???

carefully, would be my guess. ;)

JBroida
10-19-2011, 11:22 PM
a very talented sharpener and one of the guys i've spent time training with did that... the edge of those knives is hamaguri... he sharpened the top part of the bevel with a stone that gave that finish and the bottom with something that leaves a mirror finish.

UglyJoe
10-19-2011, 11:49 PM
a very talented sharpener and one of the guys i've spent time training with did that... the edge of those knives is hamaguri... he sharpened the top part of the bevel with a stone that gave that finish and the bottom with something that leaves a mirror finish.

That's what I figured but I wanted to confirm it. As a side note, I've been working a lot on getting that nice contrast on my kasumi knives, and I can get a pretty even finish and good contrast between hagane and jigane, but I can't really get it to POP like some of the pics I've seen from guys in Japan, like what was done on the knife in this video and how some of the Densyo knives are as well. Any advice? Maybe off topic here, sorry.

EdipisReks
10-19-2011, 11:53 PM
That's what I figured but I wanted to confirm it. As a side note, I've been working a lot on getting that nice contrast on my kasumi knives, and I can get a pretty even finish and good contrast between hagane and jigane, but I can't really get it to POP like some of the pics I've seen from guys in Japan, like what was done on the knife in this video and how some of the Densyo knives are as well. Any advice? Maybe off topic here, sorry.

i find that maruka and uchigomori fingerstones do the job very well.

JBroida
10-20-2011, 12:08 AM
on stainless not so much

EdipisReks
10-20-2011, 12:10 AM
on stainless not so much

i believe our friend Joe there has carbon single bevels.

JohnnyChance
10-20-2011, 03:09 AM
Nice, I'm glad they included both cuts in that one, and plated examples of each as well.

One suggestion, if you have a large field of text and don't need to go right into another text bubble, I would leave it up there a bit longer. But if you are trying to keep it simple and not clog up the screen with text all the time, I understand that too, and will just have to continue to use the pause button.

UglyJoe
10-20-2011, 03:21 PM
i believe our friend Joe there has carbon single bevels.

This is correct. I have used a variety of fingerstones and they work well at evening out the finish I get off my natural, but I still don't really get that POP. I need to handle a knife that has been expertly finished to see what it really looks like in person... pics and vids can be really deceiving.

heirkb
10-20-2011, 07:20 PM
I don't know how much it helps or how valid it is, but I do have one observation. I've noticed in people's pictures, especially Maksim's, that there's a little less contrast between hagane and jigane with the harder stones (what he calls lv 3.5 and up) than with the softer stones he posted like the lv2 ones. I wonder if it has anything to do with hardness of the stone as well.

dmccurtis
10-23-2011, 02:58 AM
a very talented sharpener and one of the guys i've spent time training with did that... the edge of those knives is hamaguri... he sharpened the top part of the bevel with a stone that gave that finish and the bottom with something that leaves a mirror finish.

I've done that on a Global yanagiba and deba. As a side note, never agree to sharpen a Global yanagiba or deba.

Eamon Burke
10-23-2011, 03:15 PM
he sharpened the top part of the bevel with a stone that gave that finish and the bottom with something that leaves a mirror finish.


HA! That is incredible. What a neat trick.


The carrot katsuramuki video was insanely informative! Love these. Please tell them to never back off on the fine details. I always tell people the two most important things when cutting are:
1. That you believe the knife will make the cut
2. You cut from your feet
...most people think I'm being funny, but I am happy to see that I am not imagining things.

Keep em coming! These are inspiring.

JohnnyChance
10-27-2011, 04:23 AM
Did some katsuramuki of a cucumber tonight after sharpening a yanagi. Came out approximately a thousand times better than my previous attempts. Thanks!

JBroida
11-04-2011, 03:20 PM
new video... The movement of Yanagiba- Hirazukuri


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_profilepage&v=CKnhOGc68YY

tk59
11-04-2011, 05:28 PM
I am thoroughly enjoying these. I need to get myself a yanagiba...

Vertigo
11-04-2011, 08:08 PM
I need to get myself a yanagiba...
Truth. Barely had the slightest interest until Jon started posting these videos. Now I'm sifting through a yanagiba "short-list" like I have any idea what I'm looking for.

UglyJoe
11-04-2011, 09:41 PM
Jon, his grip is very unique. I've never seen it before, and he uses it for basically all of his board work. Is this a common grip in Japan?

Eamon Burke
11-04-2011, 09:58 PM
You know, I find myself doing that when my knife callous starts hurting.

MadMel
11-05-2011, 12:34 AM
I actually found myself using that grip more and more after watching the vids.

JBroida
11-05-2011, 01:18 AM
Jon, his grip is very unique. I've never seen it before, and he uses it for basically all of his board work. Is this a common grip in Japan?

that is one of the 4 main grips you see in japan... he uses the others equally... its just the videos we've done do far show only this one.

JohnnyChance
11-17-2011, 04:17 AM
I did some katsuramuki with beets at work today. Had a couple beets that were bigger than softballs and I cut half of one down to a cucumber sized 3" tall cylinder. Was a little tricky with my small yanagi, now I have an excuse for an usuba, haha. I could see how having the right tool for the job would be very helpful. Not perfect results by any stretch, but passable, especially in a western kitchen. And the translucent blood red beets look awesome. Used them as a garnish on one of our dishes for a tasting menu would did tonight.

I meant to bring the rest home so I could take a picture of them, but forgot em at work. Maybe tomorrow.

Anyone ever try this on beets before?

JBroida
11-17-2011, 04:24 AM
did it while i was working in italy... works great... have to rinse them though... they bleed color like nothing else

JohnnyChance
11-17-2011, 04:33 AM
Haha yeah, I just put them in ice water like with carrots or cucumber. They bled out in no time, which is nice because you can handle them barehanded without getting stains all over your fingers.

JBroida
11-17-2011, 04:36 AM
i used to run them in a colander under super cold water until they ran almost clean and then ice water, but yeah, its nice to be able to handle them with your bare hands and the semi-translucent look they get is really cool.

Eamon Burke
11-17-2011, 06:58 PM
At the sushi bar, we often had beets, daikon and carrots for making pretty shredded garnish. The red color really adds something to a plate!

slowtyper
11-17-2011, 11:01 PM
I did some katsuramuki with beets at work today. Had a couple beets that were bigger than softballs and I cut half of one down to a cucumber sized 3" tall cylinder. Was a little tricky with my small yanagi, now I have an excuse for an usuba, haha. I could see how having the right tool for the job would be very helpful. Not perfect results by any stretch, but passable, especially in a western kitchen. And the translucent blood red beets look awesome. Used them as a garnish on one of our dishes for a tasting menu would did tonight.

I meant to bring the rest home so I could take a picture of them, but forgot em at work. Maybe tomorrow.

Anyone ever try this on beets before?

In the book "Japanese kitchen knives" they used regular red radish *white inside obviously* but it looked really nice especially since with the skin on it looked like red/white ribbons. I'm definitely going to try the beets for garnish soon.

Usually for carrot/daikon garnish we use the benriner turning slicer though, but I love doign katsuramuki.

slowtyper
11-18-2011, 12:18 AM
I did some katsuramuki with beets at work today. Had a couple beets that were bigger than softballs and I cut half of one down to a cucumber sized 3" tall cylinder.

Do you mean you trimmed them down to cucumber size and then did katsuramuki or you did katsuramuki and stopped when they were cucumber sized (so your "needles" would be small)?

JohnnyChance
11-18-2011, 04:25 AM
I trimmed them and then did the katsuramuki. Basically I made them into a uniform cylinder beforehand. My needles were about 2.5" long.