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welshstar
11-04-2011, 11:27 AM
Hi


Is anyone aware of a lower cost Kiritsuke, they seem to start at around $500+ does anyone make a good version in the $200-$300 range ?

Alan

stevenStefano
11-04-2011, 11:57 AM
Are you referring to true single bevel kiritsukes or kiritsuke gyutos? If it is the latter Konosuke does a fairly cheap one in white and HD steel, I've also seen a few Moritakas which seem quite popular. If you are talking about true single bevel kiritsukes I can't really help you, but at the same time a lot of single bevel knives are expensive for a reason. Some knives you don't wanna go cheap on. If it's single bevel kiritsukes you are talking about are you sure you really need one? They're pretty specialised

welshstar
11-04-2011, 12:03 PM
Not really sure, just investigating thyings and trying to get a feel.

In terms of actually needing it, not at all, this is strictly a vanity purchase

mpukas
11-04-2011, 12:06 PM
+1 to everything Steven said.

There's a 270 Yoshihiro (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-chef-knife-Yoshihiro-Sword-Hongasumi-27cm-/390320736045?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5ae0edc72d) on ebay for about $400. Also check out A-Frames - he's got a good selection.

Pensacola Tiger
11-04-2011, 12:25 PM
Over on the "website that cannot be named", there's a 27cm Doi kiritsuke for $359.95.


Hi


Is anyone aware of a lower cost Kiritsuke, they seem to start at around $500+ does anyone make a good version in the $200-$300 range ?

Alan

welshstar
11-04-2011, 12:31 PM
missed that one, that is a pretty knife

Looks very reasonable for $400

Keith Neal
11-04-2011, 02:15 PM
Are you referring to true single bevel kiritsukes or kiritsuke gyutos? If it is the latter Konosuke does a fairly cheap one in white and HD steel, I've also seen a few Moritakas which seem quite popular. If you are talking about true single bevel kiritsukes I can't really help you, but at the same time a lot of single bevel knives are expensive for a reason. Some knives you don't wanna go cheap on. If it's single bevel kiritsukes you are talking about are you sure you really need one? They're pretty specialised

For what purpose is the kiritsuki specialized?

Rottman
11-04-2011, 04:43 PM
For what purpose is the kiritsuki specialized?

It's somewhat of a crossbreed of usuba and yanagiba, sometimes referred to as "multipurpose knife".

add
11-04-2011, 04:58 PM
... They're pretty specialised


It's somewhat of a crossbreed of usuba and yanagiba, sometimes referred to as "multipurpose knife".


For what purpose is the kiritsuki specialized?

They specialize at being multi-purpose. :biggrin:

Rottman
11-04-2011, 05:01 PM
Multipurpose in Japanese knives is pretty damn specialized in the Western setting.

SpikeC
11-04-2011, 05:25 PM
Ya, multipurpose in Japan means that it can be used on 2 different kinds of fish!

mpukas
11-04-2011, 05:38 PM
For what purpose is the kiritsuki specialized?

AFAIK, kiritsuke is a hybrid of usuba - primarily for katsuramuki and ken cuts - and yanagiba - primarily for slicing fish, and is not as good for either task, therefore I gather that it is a difficult knife to master.

ThEoRy
11-04-2011, 06:59 PM
Good and cheap do not coincide.

jaybett
11-04-2011, 07:02 PM
After Damascus steel, the kiritsuke, is what catches most peoples eye. The most common question is can it, be substituted for a gyuto? It would be an easy transition on a double beveled one. While a single beveled kiritsukie could fill the role, it comes with a learning curve. It does the job, of a usuba and yanagiba, but not as easily. A person comfortable with those knives could switch to a kirisuke without much problem. For a beginner the typical recommendation is to pick up the individual knives and learn on them, before getting a kiritsuke.

The double beveled ones come in two styles. A relatively flat edge or a curved one. I picked up a flat one, since my go to knife is a cleaver. It's a long nakiri with a tip. The tip is the most interesting part, its a reinforced box knife, thick at the base and thin a the point. Honesuki and Hankotsu have similar tips. On my hankotsu, the whole knife is designed as a base for the tip. I really like the tip, because it feels solid, when de-boning chicken and meat. On the kiritsuke it does a nice job with onions and breaking down veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower.

A few years ago, kiritsuke mania was sweeping the forums. CKTG purchased a variety and commissioned some to be made. The fad has since subsided. CKTG may have some left over kiritsuke's such as the Doi or the Tadatsuna. It wouldn't hurt to check and see if they have any deals. If I were going to make a purchase, I'd pick up the Konosuke over at JKI.

Jay

Sarge
11-05-2011, 02:28 AM
Aframestokyo.com has a large selection. I purchase a Monzaburo 255 Ginsanko Kiritsuke(Single Bevel) for $350 it looks like it is still available for that price. There is also a 270 in White 2 for around 350 as well. I've been very happy with the knife, although it is multi-purpose you can't think of it as a sub for a gyuto/chef knife. I use it a ton during veg prep and also for breaking down or portioning boneless proteins.

The Yoshihiro would also be a good choice. It looks to be flat along the whole edge where the Monzaburo ones have a very tiny curvature at the front 1/3-1/4 perhaps.

geezr
11-05-2011, 04:22 AM
Not really sure, just investigating thyings and trying to get a feel.
In terms of actually needing it, not at all, this is strictly a vanity purchase

:plus1: Kiritsuke(Single Bevel) is least used of the single bevel knives I have - but it looks cool :knife:

Salty dog
11-05-2011, 05:59 AM
:plus1:

welshstar
11-05-2011, 09:26 AM
How do you avoid buying stuff just because it looks cool though !!!

Darkhoek
11-05-2011, 09:31 AM
How do you avoid buying stuff just because it looks cool though !!!

Well.... you don't. I have loads of cool looking stuff I "don't need". That means I have no practical purpose for it, and NOT that I don't need it for other reasons. "I want it!" is to me a more than valid argument. :)

DarKHOeK