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View Full Version : Best way to even out a blade.



aaronsgibson
03-11-2011, 11:57 AM
Well awhile back I was sharpening my Kanemasa E-series 210mm and my bro came in and started talking to me and needless to say I slipped and now my edge is uneven at the heel. So what is the best way to even it out? Or Should I just send it out to Dave? Thanks again.

sudsy9977
03-11-2011, 12:07 PM
Well it'd be an easy fix for Dave but it if you are confident in sharpening I say try to fix it. If you took too much off the heel, you have to take off an equal amount off of the rest of the blade basically. Simple fix but it might be difficult depending on how uneven it is. Hope that helps. ryan

mainaman
03-11-2011, 12:08 PM
You probably can sharpen it till it is corrected, but if there is a lot to fix that can be pretty tedious task.
A more aggressive approach would be to breadknife the edge until it is even but I am not sure if this is a very good solution.
Sending it out to get fixed may be the better option.

EdipisReks
03-11-2011, 01:52 PM
how uneven is it? i can't imagine one slip doing that much damage...

Cadillac J
03-11-2011, 02:04 PM
how uneven is it? i can't imagine one slip doing that much damage...

I was just thinking the same thing. You must of been grinding a bit at very uneven angles at all different spots in order for something like that to need "fixing".

aaronsgibson
03-11-2011, 03:05 PM
Well I was using a 1k or 1.2 k stone and wasn't paying a whole lot of attention and put my full weight behind it but if I were to say maybe 2-4 mm I'm guessing on that but I just would like to see it back to normal.

UglyJoe
03-11-2011, 03:09 PM
Well I was using a 1k or 1.2 k stone and wasn't paying a whole lot of attention and put my full weight behind it but if I were to say maybe 2-4 mm I'm guessing on that but I just would like to see it back to normal.

Picture?

Cadillac J
03-11-2011, 03:44 PM
Yes, I think a picture would help a lot to see what you are referring to.

Even on a DMT XXC, one stroke with a lot of weight behind it is not enough to ruin a bevel to where it needs some major repair. Of course it would scratch the bevel shoulder and not look the cleanest(as you see the mistake) , but it shouldn't be enough to fubar anything at all.

EdipisReks
03-11-2011, 04:07 PM
Well I was using a 1k or 1.2 k stone and wasn't paying a whole lot of attention and put my full weight behind it but if I were to say maybe 2-4 mm I'm guessing on that but I just would like to see it back to normal.

2-4mm is A LOT. if your 1k stone can remove that so quickly, i'd suggest you post the brand name over in this thread (http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php?348-Best-tool-for-Stock-Removal). :)

aaronsgibson
03-11-2011, 04:55 PM
Sorry but only thing I have is a fixed web cam on my laptop I'll see if I can get a picture or not. But as for the amount I'm giving that a full estimate on my part. Odds are I will just send it to Dave seeings how I'm very lacking in the rough stones. But thanks everyone.

olpappy
03-11-2011, 05:18 PM
One slip really shouldn't do that much damage to your knife. If it really did remove that much material, I still wouldn't try to fix it right away, as that will involve removing material around it to match, thereby reducing the lifespan of your knife. If you have significant damage (which doesn't seem likely if it was just a slip), the best thing to do would be to just sharpen normally (i.e., when the edge is dull and needs sharpening) until you've removed enough material to 'catch up' to the damaged area.

aaronsgibson
03-11-2011, 05:23 PM
Yeah I've also been thinking about doing that. I'm thinking that it might even out after a few sessions but if not off to Dave it will go.

Dave Martell
03-11-2011, 06:12 PM
Picture?


I was going to ask for the same thing.

aaronsgibson
03-11-2011, 06:20 PM
I'll see if I can take a halfway decent one with the web cam that is built into my laptop. Stay tuned.

Dave Martell
03-11-2011, 06:28 PM
Good luck with that. :)

aaronsgibson
03-11-2011, 07:30 PM
I know :) never used the thing yet so this should be [I]very[I] interesting.

ghalle
03-15-2011, 01:26 AM
I wouldn't try to alter the rest of the blade to match the heel area as you'll end up removing steel further up the blade profile into a slightly thicker area which will slightly decrease the cutting efficiency of the blade. Just resharpen the heel area to the proper angle and when sharpening the rest of the blade, use some wrist angle changes to blend the main blade edge portion to the heel area. Repeat this several times and you might not even notice any significant change in edge profile.