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mr drinky
12-08-2011, 03:12 AM
Jon did that great video on pronouncing different knife types a while back, which I liked, but can someone tell me how to pronounce these brand names correctly?

Glestain
Suisin

I have heard 'Suisin' pronounced a couple of different ways recently. I confess ignorance on this one, but I bet there are a lot of brands and knife names that we mispronounce. Personally, I think I need an immersion course at the Broida household.

k.

JBroida
12-08-2011, 03:15 AM
suisin is easy


sue-E-shin

mano
12-08-2011, 03:16 AM
Yeah, Jon is amazing with pronunciation. At the ECG he was correcting me every time I opened my mouth.









And I was speaking English.

JBroida
12-08-2011, 03:16 AM
haha

454Casull
12-24-2011, 03:46 PM
SOY-seen is a close enough approximation, but the actual pronunciation is more like SOOEE-seen, with the EE being very brief.

"Sui" is pronounced the same as the "sui" in "suiton" heard here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sN2CeynIdQ

I'm guessing Glestain may be French but I stopped learning it in high school so I can't help there.

Eamon Burke
12-24-2011, 04:25 PM
Wow, I was somewhat close. I've always said "Soo-ee-sin".

I just say Glestain just how it looks--rhymes with "less-pain".

Kyle
12-24-2011, 08:02 PM
I'm not sure I pronounce Heiji correctly. Any help?

JBroida
12-25-2011, 03:08 PM
hey- G

unkajonet
12-25-2011, 03:20 PM
hey- G

Really? I always thought it was pronounced "Buy Me"

JBroida
12-25-2011, 03:32 PM
haha... thats our "in store name" for it :P

Should we make a video with brand name pronunciations?

SpikeC
12-25-2011, 03:38 PM
Yup.

bikehunter
12-25-2011, 03:43 PM
Well, here's a dumb one, a little off the subject. I don't know the correct pronunciation of Seki (I can pronounce Japan. <g.)

ThEoRy
12-25-2011, 03:45 PM
Yes please. It really bugs me when someone says Koh-noh-SUE-kee or Toe-GY-roe. You're over Roamnizing it!!! lol

JBroida
12-25-2011, 03:46 PM
seki sounds like the "se" from set and "key" as in what you use to open a lock
se- key

bikehunter
12-25-2011, 03:48 PM
seki sounds like the "se" from set and "key" as in what you use to open a lock
se- key

Glad I asked. I thought it was Sek-eye...thanks.

unkajonet
12-25-2011, 03:48 PM
A pronunciation video would be awesome.

JBroida
12-25-2011, 03:52 PM
A pronunciation video would be awesome.

maybe you guys could type up a list of the things you want to hear... we may not be able to get to all of them, but we'll do our best

99Limited
12-25-2011, 04:30 PM
Well here's one that I need help with: Aritsugu

Eamon Burke
12-25-2011, 04:35 PM
Yes!

TB_London
12-25-2011, 05:37 PM
Pronunciation vid would be epic

Would be nice to include some other knifey words as well

Aogami
Shirogami
Kissaki
Shinogi
etc

I keep thinking how amusing I'd find it if it were sung in the style of Tom Lehrer singing the elements, with the -ium suffix sounding a bit like san it could work lol


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6b2Uy1TDAl4&feature=youtube_gdata_player

WiscoNole
12-25-2011, 06:03 PM
Glad I asked. I thought it was Sek-eye...thanks.

That would be Sekai

ecchef
12-25-2011, 06:06 PM
How to pronounce Japanese words.
On this page SAMPA is used to represent the pronunciation of consonants and vowels.

Summary
Vowel letters are pronounced like in the Italian or Spanish language, consonant letters are pronounced like in the English language.

Vowel letters
"a"
Represents the sound /a/.
It sounds like "a" in Ger. "mann", like "u" in Eng. "but". Not like "a" in Eng. "man".

"e"
Represents the sound /e/.
It sounds like "e" in Eng. "get".

"i"
Represents the sound /i/.
It sounds like "i" in Eng. "it".

"o"
Represents the sound /o/.
It sounds like "o" in Ger. "oft", not like "o" in American Eng. "hot".

"u"
Represents the sound /u/.
It sounds like "u" in Ger. "mutter" and in Eng. "put", never like "u" in Eng. "but".

""
Represents the sound /a:/ (long /a/).
It sounds like "aa" in Ger. "haar", like "a" in British Eng. "car".

""
Represents the sound /e:/ (long /e/).
It sounds like "ee" in Ger. "tee".
"a" in Eng. "cake" is also approximate, but not the same.

""
Represents the sound /i:/ (long /i/).
It sounds like "ih" in Ger. "ihr", like "ee" in Eng. "feel".

""
Represents the sound /o:/ (long /o/).
It sounds like "oh" in Ger. "ohr".
"o" in Eng. "so" is also approximate, but not the same.

""
Represents the sound /u:/ (long /u/).
It sounds like "uh" in Ger. "uhr", like "oo" in Eng. "food".

Notes:
Long and short vowels are distinguished; for example:

"obsan (/oba:san/)" means "grandmother, old lady", but "obasan (/obasan/)" means "aunt, middle-aged lady".
The capital of Japan is "Tky (/to:kjo:/)", not "Tokyo (/tokjo/)".
Nevertheless, the Japanese character code (called "JIS code") does not contain characters to represent the long vowels (e.g., characters with circumflex or macron, such as "", "", "", "", "", ...) So when writing Japanese in the Roman Alphabet, most of the Japanese write long vowels as the same as short ones unwillingly.

In Eastern Japan, including Tky, /u/ and /u:/ are usually pronounced as unrounded or compressed schwa-like vowels.

Consonant letters
"b"
Represents the sound /b/.
It sounds like "b" in Eng. "best". Sometimes the phoneme represented by this letter is also pronounced like /B/ unconsciously, which is like "b" in Spanish "haba".
Incidentally, most of the Japanese can not distinguish between the voiced plosives and the voiced fricatives, so that they can not tell the difference between "b" and "v" by hearing, nor by speaking.

"c"
Usually not used.

"ch"
Represents the sound /tS/.
It sounds like "ch" in Eng. "child" and like "tsch" in Ger. "Deutsch".

"d"
Represents the sound /d/.
It sounds like "d" in Eng. "do".

"dz"
See "z".

"f"
Represents the sound /p\/. (X-SAMPA)
This consonant is approximate to "f" in Eng. "full", but not the same. Exactly, "f" in Japanese is pronounced not with the lower lip and the upper teeth, but with both lips.

"g"
Represents the sound /g/.
It sounds like "g" in Eng. "get", never like "g" in Eng. "angel".

In other positions than the beginning of a word, the phoneme represented by this letter is also pronounced as /N/, which is like "ng" in Eng. "sing", or /G/ which is like "g" in Spanish "lago". The former sound (/N/) is considered as a model, but fading out nowadays.

"h"
This letter:

Represents the sound /h/ before a vowel other than /i/ and /i:/. It sounds like "h" in Eng. "hat" and in Ger. "Haar".

Represents the sound /C/ before /i/ or /i:/. It sounds like "ch" in Ger. "Ich" and like "h" in Eng. "huge".

The "h" sound is never dropped in Japanese.
Some people use this letter in meaning of lengthening out the preceding vowel, just like German orthography. However, the /h/ sound appears in the middle of a word in the Japanese language, so that some people dislike this "lengthening use" because it causes confusion when the next syllable begins with a vowel.
For example: "ohi" can be considered as "o-hi (/o:Ci/)" which means "queen" and as "oh-i (/o:i/)" which means "throne".

"hy"
Represents the sound /C/.
It sounds like "ch" in Ger. "Ich" and like "h" in Eng. "huge".

"j"
Represents the sound /Z/ or /dZ/.
The phoneme represented by this letter has two phonetic varieties. One is like "s" in Eng. "fusion", like "g" in Eng. "massage" and in Ger. "orange", and like "j" in Fre. "je". The other is like "j" in Eng. "joy" and like "dsch" in Ger. "dschungel".
These two consonants had been distinguished until about the 16th century (about 400 years ago) in Japanese, but now most dialects do not have this distinction. You therefore can pronounce this letter as either /Z/ or /dZ/.

Some sensitive people, if necessary to distinguish, use "zh" to represent the former consonant(/Z/), and "j" for the latter consonant(/dZ/).

"k"
Represents the sound /k/.
It sounds like "k" in Eng. "kind".

"l"
Usually not used, for the Japanese language does not have the consonant "l". But rarely, "l" is used as a variant of "r" mainly to pretend that a word is a Western word.
Anyhow, even if you find the letter "l" in a Japanese text or hear the /l/ sound from a Japanese (especially singers), it is always only a variant of /r/.

"m"
Represents the sound /m/.
It sounds like "m" in Eng. "me".

"n (before a vowel)"
This letter:

Represents the sound /n/ before a vowel other than /i/ and /i:/. It sounds like "n" in Eng. "nice".

Represents the sound /J/ before /i/ or /i:/. It sounds like "gn" in Fre. "champignon" and in Ita. "segno".

"n (syllabic nasal)"
The Japanese language has one rare sound called "syllabic nasal". It is usually written as "n", but "m" is also used only before labial consonants /p/, /b/, /m/.
This "syllabic nasal" has several phonetic varieties, does not have its own particular sound. Its sound varies according to the position where it appear. For example:

Before labial consonants except fricatives (/p/, /b/, /m/), pronounced as /m/ like "m" in Eng. "man".

Before alveolar consonants except fricatives (/t/, /d/, /n/, /ts/, /tS/, /dz/, /dZ/, /r/), pronounced as /n/ like "n" in Eng. "not".

Before /J/, pronounced as /J/ like "ny" in Eng. "canyon".

Before velar consonants (/k/, /g/, /N/), pronounced as /N/ like "ng" in Eng. "king".

Before a vowel or a consonant other than the above, or at the end of a word, pronounced as a nasal vowel or a uvular nasal (no corresponding letter in SAMPA. /N\/ in X-SAMPA.)

Nevertheless, you do not have to be sensitive to these differences. Because most of the Japanese usually do not recognise these above varieties being in pronunciation of the syllabic "n", so that you can even always pronounce the /n/ sound for every syllabic "n".
The only thing you have to take care is not to pronounce the syllabic "n" and the next vowel continuously when a vowel follows a syllabic "n". In such cases, you have to put a pause between them. Otherwise, some confusion may be caused; for example:

"an-i" means "ease", but "ani" means "elder brother".
"gen-in" means "cause", but "genin" means "manservant".
"ny"
Represents the sound /J/.
It sounds like "gn" in Fre. "champignon" and in Ita. "segno" and "ny" in Eng. "canyon".

"p"
Represents the sound /p/.
It sounds like "p" in Eng. "put".

"q"
Not used.

"r"
Represents the sound /r/.
It sounds like "r" in Scottish Eng. "rose", or like "tt" in American Eng. "matter". That is, "r" in Japanese is usually pronounced as a tap or flap. Some people pronounce it as a trill.

"s"
Represents the sound /s/.
It sounds like "s" in Eng. "so", not like "s" in Ger. "so" or in Eng. "is".

"sh"
Represents the sound /S/.
It sounds like "sh" in Eng. "shall", like "sch" in Ger. "schein", and like "ch" in Fre. "chou".

"t"
Represents the sound /t/.
It always sounds like "t" in Eng. "ten", never like "tt" in American Eng. "better".

"ts"
Represents the sound /ts/.
It sounds like "ts" in Eng. "cats" and like "z" in Ger. "zu".

"v"
Not used. The Japanese language does not have the consonant "v".

"w"
Represents the sound /w/.
It sounds like "w" in Eng. "way".

"x"
Not used.

"y"
Represents the sound /j/.
It sounds like "y" in Eng. "you", "year", and like "j" in Ger. "jahr".

"z"
Represents the sound /z/ or /dz/.
The phoneme represented by this letter has two phonetic varieties. One is like "z" in Eng. "puzzle", the other is like "ds" in Eng. "cards" and like "z" in Ita. "zucchini".
These two consonants had been distinguished until about the 16th century (about 400 years ago) in Japanese, but now most dialects do not have this distinction. You therefore can pronounce this letter as either /z/ or /dz/.

Some sensitive people, if necessary to distinguish /z/ and /dz/, use "z" to represent the former consonant, and "dz" for the latter consonant.
This letter, however, is never used to represent a consonant like "z" in Ger. "zwei".

"zh"
Seldom used. See "j".

Notes
Long and short consonants are distinguished before a vowel, just like the Italian language; for example: "ita" means "was/were, stayed", but "itta" means "went, gone".

Schtoo
12-25-2011, 10:22 PM
I don't have the problem you are experiencing...

Merii Kurisumasu. ;)

Stu.

(Who's spoken Japanese actually sucks, but sounds like a newscaster.)

JBroida
12-26-2011, 01:06 AM
katakana words always throw me off ;)

454Casull
12-26-2011, 04:42 AM
Well here's one that I need help with: Aritsugu

AH-reet (punctuated sharply)-su-gu

The "ah" sounds like a cross between "hat" and "are". The "re" is not supposed to have the 't' attached to it (it's suppose to go with the "tsu") but if you pronounce it fast, it ends up sounding the same.

Lemme get a voice clip uploaded... download it here:

http://www.sendspace.com/file/pybe5w

DO NOT CLICK ON ANY PICTURES - ONLY CLICK THE TEXT THAT SAYS " Click here to start download from sendspace"

Schtoo
12-26-2011, 09:32 AM
katakana words always throw me off ;)

Takes a loong time to get your head around them, and sometimes the meaning of them is different which makes your nanosecond of pride come down in a crashing heap...

I've pretty much got them nailed down though. I figure if I can read them in every direction they come in, reading them isn't a problem any more. :)


Stu.

(Who writes emails in the stuff, and if I make the effort, they actually make sense! Pity it takes me an hour to write even simple stuff, and Mrs. Schtoo can bash them out all flowery and nice in 5-10 minutes. Pride crushed again...)





Mr. Casull, perfect!

But I can tell you're not native... ;)