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View Full Version : Where can mere mortals buy prime cuts?



deker
03-18-2011, 11:05 AM
I've always heard that restaurants get most of the prime cuts and that all we consumers can really get in the store is choice. Where would a guy who isn't in the restaurant biz find prime steaks?

Inquiring minds want to know! :D

-d

mikemac
03-18-2011, 11:17 AM
Whole Foods, and sometimes Costco
Last year the local costco had really nice frozen prime cuts

deanb
03-18-2011, 12:06 PM
My Costco usually carries prime New York strips and boneless ribeye, steaks or whole. When I buy them whole I dry age them in my fridge.

deker
03-18-2011, 12:18 PM
In a related question that just occurred to me...I have access to several local meat markets/butchers that source from local farms. They never really discuss/mention grading, they just have tasty beef for sale. Do these folks use USDA grading typically?

-d

chazmtb
03-18-2011, 01:12 PM
Whole paycheck is a good place, but you give your whole paycheck. Costco. In Orlando here, they usually have prime NY strip and Ribeye, sometimes Sirloin (their butcher said the prime sirloin was better than the choice NY strip. I doubt that because Costco's choice steaks has alwasy had good marbling). All meats at Costco have USDA stickers on them. Prime NY strip go anywhere from 8.99 to 10.99 /#. If you buy the cryo pack, it is usually a dollar a # less.

rysara
03-23-2011, 01:41 AM
In a related question that just occurred to me...I have access to several local meat markets/butchers that source from local farms. They never really discuss/mention grading, they just have tasty beef for sale. Do these folks use USDA grading typically?

-d

Most local farms have either an inspector on premise or one that comes on a daily basis. You probably just have to ask your butcher what grade of meat he/she is getting and what they can get their hands on. Sometimes, butchers will save the best cuts of meat for 'favorite' customers, which is why it is always a good idea to invite your butcher to your bbq ;)

trevt777
03-24-2011, 06:54 PM
I think there are mail-order sources as well?

I've ordered American Wagyu from these folks before with good results: http://www.snakeriverfarms.com/

I know there are others, however, as well.

T.

MikeZ
03-25-2011, 02:05 AM
Find a butcher shop near you there is most likely one not to far. The good ones carry fresh prime meat. I would try to seek out a butcher or meat market before costco but thats just me.. Try Myers'meat Market Inc 600 3rd St Hanover, PA (717) 632-1684

wenus2
03-25-2011, 02:21 AM
Any butcher worth his salt would order you in some prime upon request, even if it's not something he normally stocks.
The same goes for any random ass cut you saw on Iron Chef and think you just have to try.

As far as "choice" meat in supermarkets, yes, some carry it. Most meat you see in the market is actually a grade down though, "select." Particularly if you cant find a USDA grade sticker on it, it's most likely "select" grade. (as in, don't select this one)
Many market carry both, touting the choice cuts as some grand thing and proceed to charge prime prices (or nearly so).

Eamon Burke
03-25-2011, 01:48 PM
Here in Texas we have Central Market. It's amazing! Maybe you have something like that there.

deker
03-27-2011, 07:51 PM
Find a butcher shop near you there is most likely one not to far. The good ones carry fresh prime meat. I would try to seek out a butcher or meat market before costco but thats just me.. Try Myers'meat Market Inc 600 3rd St Hanover, PA (717) 632-1684

Myers' has some great stuff for sure. I don't get out that way too often, but when I stop in there I'm never disappointed. I know we have several good meat markets within 10 miles or so, I was more wondering on how grading is handled in smaller markets that source from local farmers.

I'll make sure to ask about prime cuts next time I stop in to my local butcher.

-d

Doug Seward
03-27-2011, 09:05 PM
Deker,
Westtown Meat Market in Westtown, just outside of West Chester, PA dry ages Prime Beef and it is excellent. Not Cheap, but fairly priced for Dry Aged Prime Beef. I have eaten a few steaks in my day and the best of them have come from Westtown. Ask for Jerry or Penny. Next time you are in town I will pick some up. -Doug

MikeZ
03-27-2011, 09:48 PM
Meat is graded by the USDA by the marbling or fat really, i think a little of it has to do with the age also? Prime choice select etc.. A lot of the local stuff, even the grass fed or angus whatever the label is you see is really choice. It depends on what you are looking for in flavor and texture.

JohnnyChance
03-27-2011, 09:53 PM
None near you, but for other people checking this thread http://www.themeathouse.com/locations/find-a-butcher.aspx

They have always have multiple prime and wagyu cuts available.

ThEoRy
03-27-2011, 10:10 PM
My Costco usually carries prime New York strips and boneless ribeye, steaks or whole. When I buy them whole I dry age them in my fridge.

You keep them for 21 to 28 days at 32-34 degrees F. and 100-85% relative humidity, with an air velocity of 0.5 to 2.5 m/sec? My fridge doesn't do that one. Time for an upgrade. :D All three conditions are extremely important in the proper postmortem aging of carcasses, as well as beef ribs and loins.

wenus2
03-28-2011, 04:22 AM
can you "dry age" anything at 100% humidity? :slaphead:

ThEoRy
03-28-2011, 10:52 PM
Yes. Seeing as how the beef looses 1% of it's moisture per day due to evaporation as it is drying out. This is in opposition to wet aging where the beef is vacuum sealed and retains its moisture as it ages preventing volume loss from drying out.

wenus2
03-29-2011, 01:37 AM
At 100% humidity one is more likely to see condensation than evaporation.
By definition evaporation doesn't readily take place at 100% relative humidity, because that is the saturation point.

This process is a function of temperature and humidity, one will see little to no evaporation of moisture at 100% humidity or 32F. Likewise one will have jerky at 0% humidity or 170F (for extended periods). The trick is to keep the rate of evaporation gradual and the temp below that at which meat will spoil (or cook).

I've always done well with more like 38F and 60%.