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View Full Version : Like this article, thoght others might like it too



Marko Tsourkan
01-21-2012, 11:32 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/22/education/edlife/a-sharper-mind-middle-age-and-beyond.html?pagewanted=1&hpw

Seth
01-22-2012, 01:35 AM
...didn't think you were getting that old...

Cipcich
01-22-2012, 02:13 AM
What's your point?

tgraypots
01-22-2012, 11:43 AM
Thanks Marko! I found it fascinating. Even though I only attended college a coupla years, I have continually read and learned new skills. My short term memory is slipping, but I still remember Christmas presents and events from when I was very young. I was not really college material, preferring to spend my time surfing, but am glad of most of the choices I've made, and hope that my cognitive skills hold out for another 20+ years.

Eamon Burke
01-22-2012, 11:59 AM
Although I'm not close to old, I take keeping up with my mental health and agility seriously. I don't want to live forever, but if and when I get to my 70s, I still want to be able to ride a bike, touch my toes, and discover new music.

Bryan G.
01-22-2012, 01:59 PM
"Life is growth, and growth is change, each seven years period takes us into a new cycle. The first seven years is the period of infancy. The next seven the period of childhood, representing the beginning of individual responsibility. The next seven represents the period of adolescence. The fourth period marks the attainment of full growth. The fifth period is the constructive period, when men begin to acquire property, possessions, a home and family. The next from 35 to 42, is a period of reactions and changes, and this in turn is followed by a period of reconstruction, adjustment and recuperation, so as to be ready for a new cycle of sevens, beginning with the fiftieth year." -My good friend Charles

Thanks for sharing Marko.

Kind Regards,

Bryan

Marko Tsourkan
01-22-2012, 08:21 PM
I thought the article was fascinating. It explained some things that I have observed over the years, but didn't have explanation for.
As a side note, getting interested in knives, cooking, nutrition is a good way to engage your brain, so it is a plus. :)

tk59
01-23-2012, 02:50 AM
Thanks for posting this, Marko.

zitangy
01-23-2012, 09:22 AM
I thought the article was fascinating. It explained some things that I have observed over the years, but didn't have explanation for.
As a side note, getting interested in knives, cooking, nutrition is a good way to engage your brain, so it is a plus. :)

Knife sharpening made me realize the following...

most people.. look and they do not see...
Most people touch and they do not feel...
Most people listen.. they do not hear....


I suppose that to do anything well, you really have to engage your senses. Most people only engage their visual acuity only in whatever they do and that even at times.. they do not see...

Rgds

d

Bryan G.
01-23-2012, 11:11 AM
They just don't THINK seems to be the equation. Thinking is more that just what do I want for dinner. As the above states it's a combination of intellect and feeling/senses.

I can relate to knife sharpening and using quality knives as being a door opening experience in this.

Regards

Salty dog
01-23-2012, 11:33 AM
Very interesting. As with Marko, it spelled out what I pretty much knew and have experienced.

It sort of relates to a post I made in another forum about playing computer games and how it helps with my knife and other skills. I'm one of those un-educated old guys they're talking about.

tk59
01-23-2012, 04:49 PM
My students often tell me it must be great to be "done with school." I always reply that the day they are done learning is the day they start dying. To me, everything I take the time to do is an experiment worthy of analysis. What's funny is it seems they all like to reap the rewards of that analysis but constantly doing it to everything is something most don't have the stomach for. Most would rather follow the masses and not think too much.