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DanB
02-01-2012, 06:02 PM
OK, so after returning my 10" Zwilling Kramer to Cutleryandmore a couple weeks ago, I finally decided on the new Tojiro Senkou 240 mm gyuto from them. Just arrived. I have to say, my initial impressions are very good. Fit and finish issues with the DP are solved I think with the Senkou style. Micarta handle is round and smooth. From the pictures one might think it a strange, maybe quirky design, but it feels natural in my hand (I could use just a hair more width, but it's still quite comfortable). Blade arrived very sharp. Damascus pattern is beautiful but subtle (not, in other words, like a Shun). Very thin profile. Absolutely smooth transition from blade to bolster to handle. I've only cut up a melon so far, and it was noticeably easier than my well sharpened Forschner or my previous Kramer. I think this might do the trick. Thanks for all your help.

P.S. I know some of you recommended the Miyabi 7000MC, and that may be better steel (or at least harder steel for sure), but I just find the knife butt ugly. Just couldn't talk myself into it. Maybe I'll change my mind in time. Would help if I could handle one some day.

P.P.S. Customer service at Cutleryandmore is out of this world. They really want you to be happy with a purchase. They called me in response to my email about the Kramer, asked by the way I use a knife, and were clear that if I didn't like my next purchase, I should return it, no questions asked. Impressive.

Deckhand
02-02-2012, 04:24 PM
I bought a tojiro senkou bird's beak parer. Very sharp and great fit and finish. Wanted a tourne knife. Hope you enjoy yours.

DanB
02-02-2012, 07:26 PM
Yes I am. Very sharp indeed. Fulfills the cutting the onion with blade weight alone test impeccably. Handle is very comfy. Will probably get the parer/petty too.

Deckhand
02-02-2012, 07:36 PM
For a standard parer I bought a FH hattori. Wicked little knife. I make radish mushrooms and flowers for my daughters lunches.

DanB
02-02-2012, 08:06 PM
I would probably venture into some of the more interesting Japanese knives too, but I have a ton of credit with Cutlery and more, since I returned a Zwilling Kramer to them a couple of weeks ago. So I will probably buy from their selection until I use that up. Thinking of the Henckels Twin Cermax too (which went up in price $10 literally overnight, probably cuz all the guys here have been telling ppl about it!).

Deckhand
02-02-2012, 11:27 PM
I understand using up the credit. I have a couple things they carry. Microplane I use for Parmesan and Romano. Couldn't live without it, and a Breville sous chef. Good luck on your knife adventure. It's fun.

Lefty
02-03-2012, 04:34 AM
For what it's worth, I used a Tojiro DP petty for a little bit and it was a great little knife. Tojiro knows what they're doing, for sure. And they ARE interesting Japanese knives. Don't sell the new gyuto short!
When it came down to decision time, I however, chose my Fujiwara FKH petty over the Tojiro. For me, it just transitioned from board to in the hand cutting a bit better than the Tojiro. Of course, with that being said, I would have been happy with either.
Congrats on the new gyuto. It's a wicked looking blade, and I'm sure you will love it!

DanB
02-03-2012, 11:11 AM
Thanks Lefty. I tried the Tojiro DP years ago and liked the blade but not the handle. Gave it to my mom. But after a few disappoints since, I came back to them with the new Senkou series. It is a nice fit and finish (with a higher price tag of course). In that price range, I might have gone with a different maker if I was buying anywhere. But I had $350 in credit with cutleryandmore after returning the Kramer (BIG disappointment!), so I figured I should start there. VG-10 is plenty fine for me (Chad Ward says it's his favorite kitchen steel), and I have to say, it came very sharp. I don't think I knew what sharp was before. So yeah, quite happy so far. Handle is comfy even if it takes a bit to get used to. No complaints so far (hope I don't come crying about chips!). For now, I'll use my Forschner for "dangerous" jobs :-)

Deckhand
02-04-2012, 11:54 PM
Dan,
Was just obsessing on the tojiro itk bread knife where you have the credit. PCC kitchen on you tube has some videos using the knife for bread, watermelon,etc. if you watch the video you will want one. It's only $60.00 I will definitely be buying one!

Deckhand
02-05-2012, 12:27 AM
Dan,
Was just obsessing on the tojiro itk bread knife where you have the credit. PCC kitchen on you tube has some videos using the knife for bread, watermelon,etc. if you watch the video you will want one. It's only $60.00 I will definitely be buying one!
They are on clearance and sold out elsewhere just bought one couldn't help myself free shipping and just under $55

DanB
02-06-2012, 12:39 PM
They are on clearance and sold out elsewhere just bought one couldn't help myself free shipping and just under $55

That is tempting. I don't do a lot of dense bread cutting, so my Forschner's bread knife has been plenty functional when needed. However, how is it at slicing a big roast or other meat? That might tempt me, given its length.

Lefty
02-06-2012, 01:14 PM
I'd rather cut roasts and bread with a suji than cut bread and roasts with a bread knife.

Deckhand
02-06-2012, 01:20 PM
I am sure it would get the job done, I had actually planned on trying it for a roast. I have four kids. Between birthday cakes,bread, watermelon, pineapple, mango, etc. It will get plenty of use. If you are doing a lot of roasts a dedicated slicer like a sujihiki would be the best choice. Most people would recommend a longer sujihiki like a 270mm or 300mm. Any knife will get a job done. Certain knives do a better job. I have a misono ux10 sujihiki 240mm on my list of next buys. I want to trim steaks, prep, and slice. I think it will serve me well. Most would all would say they are overpriced. I may get a konosuke, massamoto, or some other brand. I want a full set of knives and thought a bread slicer that destroys watermelon, pineapple, etc. for that price was too tempting.

Deckhand
02-06-2012, 01:20 PM
I'd rather cut roasts and bread with a suji than cut bread and roasts with a bread knife.

Agree

DanB
02-06-2012, 03:09 PM
I'd rather cut roasts and bread with a suji than cut bread and roasts with a bread knife.

Yeah, that's what I'd been thinking too, hence the lack of need for another serrated knife. So why does every piece of knife advice I've ever seen, including from good people (like Chad Ward) always say you need a serrated bread knife? I really sharp chef's will cut a boule of bread fine, and if you need a serrated knife for tomatoes, there's something really wrong with your chef's knife.

Lefty
02-07-2012, 08:17 AM
You know what, Dan? That's a good question, and one that I can't really answer. Don't get me wrong, I use a bread knife often enough, but it's just a bread knife to me, and trust me, I pull my Carter suji at least as often when I'm cutting bread. Not to mention, I have never prepped an entire meal with a bread knife, but the suji can do it all.

Andrew H
02-07-2012, 10:56 AM
Yeah, that's what I'd been thinking too, hence the lack of need for another serrated knife. So why does every piece of knife advice I've ever seen, including from good people (like Chad Ward) always say you need a serrated bread knife? I really sharp chef's will cut a boule of bread fine, and if you need a serrated knife for tomatoes, there's something really wrong with your chef's knife.

A knife for every job, perhaps? I know a suji or a chef's knife will cut a boule, but for me it doesn't do as good of a job as a bread knife.

Johnny.B.Good
02-07-2012, 12:38 PM
I would hesitate to take my 270mm Carter to a crusty baguette, but perhaps that is babying the knife more than is necessary. Bread knives are not expensive, so I see no reason not to have and use one.