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kalaeb
03-22-2011, 03:32 PM
I have decided that eight 240 gyutos is just the right amount and now I am looking for something else.

I have been eyeing a Doi Kiritsuke, but know very little about them. Anyone have any experiance with Doi, or can anyone recommend any other Kiritsuke in the $300.00 range.

Note, this will be my first single bevel knife, and I have no idea how to use them, but I am looking forward to learning.

Any help or direction would be greatly appreciated, thanks,

riverie
03-22-2011, 03:39 PM
I would reccomend you to start with yanagi to learn using single bevel first. After you got fluent with it than you can step up with kiritsuke.

chazmtb
03-22-2011, 03:48 PM
I have a Doi (son)Kirisuke in 240mm II white and a Monzaburo 240mm white II Kiritsuke. It's sad to say, but I have the Doi just to have it. I use the Monzaburo once in a while, slicing fish when I am not making sushi. It is a difficult knife to use, and I am probably doing everything wrong with it. For the most part, I use a guyto and a petty and a suji for most of my cutting at home.

The Doi's is a piece of work, bevel is perfectly straight, with no overgrinds that I can see. It is a well made knife with excellent fit and finish. I would compare it to a large usuba with a Kiritsuke tip. The edge is dead straight. It is pretty thin. The Monzaburo is a more substantial knife. It probably is about 3mm at the spine. The edge has a little belly, which is good for me, because I use it kind of like a guyto. There are two low spots in the grind, on the hagane part of bevel right above the edge, that I have been trying to get out. It's been tough, but I would imagine any knife like the Monzaburo at its price range would have these issues.

BTW, I would suggest not getting a kiritsuke as your first single bevel. For me, I have used yanagibas and usubas, and I still can't get the kiritsuke. I am not that good with a usuba either. Cooking styles are too different for me to learn to use the usuba or kiritsuke effectively. But, using them once in a while makes me appreciate those who can master these knives.

Citizen Snips
03-22-2011, 03:49 PM
this is absolutely right. i found that a yanagi is actually the best to learn on because of the length. i would recommend using a deba and usuba after that before you get into a kiritsuke. i didn't want to hear it but was informed by a vendor that getting a kiritsuke rather than a usuba or gyuto was not a great idea without quite a bit of practice with single bevel knives. i am very glad i took his advice because i have since used both usuba and kiritsuke and found that a gyuto was much more versatile. i would really recommend a yanagi or even a usuba before a kiritsuke.

they are beautiful and enticing knives though :D

SpikeC
03-22-2011, 04:43 PM
I have read these cautions elsewhere, butt I have not heard exactly why this is the case. What is it about the kiritsuke that makes it difficult?

JBroida
03-22-2011, 05:30 PM
I have read these cautions elsewhere, butt I have not heard exactly why this is the case. What is it about the kiritsuke that makes it difficult?

Single bevel knives are a skill set that most people never take the time to learn in the first place (for the most part... or at least in my experience)... however, with a yanagiba, deba, or usuba, at least the purpose of the knife is clear and it is designed specifically for that task. The kiritsuke (and mioroshi deba for that matter) is a hybrid knife, so to speak. Its a hybrid between a yanagiba and usuba, but it excels at neither task. However to get the most out of, one needs to be well versed with the skill sets for both of the basic knives in the design. Otherwise, it ends up being an awkward blade that is difficult to use as a yanagiba or an usuba. Also, a lot of people believe it to be an all-purpose knife, as that is how it is often translated. It is an all purpose knife in a traditional Japanese kitchen, but it by no means an all purpose knife in a western kitchen... i would advise people not to think of it as a single bevel gyuto with a cool tip... it is surely not that.

chazmtb
03-22-2011, 05:31 PM
Single beve. Cuts are completely push controlled. No room for any rocking at all or you will damage the tip. Cuts need to be controlled, since it is single bevel, it tends to veer/roll to the back side of the blade. If you don't know how to use it efficiently, it would take a lot more time to complete a task than a double bevel like a gyuto would take. To me the hardest thing to get use to is the lack of any belly.

riverie
03-22-2011, 06:07 PM
I tried my friend's kiritsuke for a full shift in sushi bar before, for me the only appropriate task to use it is just for katsuramuki and push cut some veggies. Tried to do some sushi/sashimi slice and I felt awkward, it feels like you using kama usuba instead of slicer/yanagi. I don't understand why it considered as a cross between yanagi and usuba, the profile itself almost deadflat.

JBroida
03-22-2011, 07:07 PM
I tried my friend's kiritsuke for a full shift in sushi bar before, for me the only appropriate task to use it is just for katsuramuki and push cut some veggies. Tried to do some sushi/sashimi slice and I felt awkward, it feels like you using kama usuba instead of slicer/yanagi. I don't understand why it considered as a cross between yanagi and usuba, the profile itself almost deadflat.

it should have a bit of cruve to it, otherwise its really more like a large mukimono, in which case you'd be right on about its use

Tristan
03-23-2011, 01:04 AM
I purchased 2 Dois, one is a suisin hayate and the other is from messermiester, it is a doi fugubiki.

Fit and finish are really very impressive, and to be honest, I purchased it mostly because I wanted a doi more than any other reason. I'm learning on a tanaka yani rather than the Doi right now. Still, they are one of the best made knives in my collection

riverie
03-23-2011, 08:45 AM
it should have a bit of cruve to it, otherwise its really more like a large mukimono, in which case you'd be right on about its use

Yes Jon it has a little curve on it, very little though. the one that I used just start curving after like 3/4 length of the blade, close to the tip.

kalaeb
03-24-2011, 01:14 AM
Thank you all for your replies, you have dissuaded me from the Kiritsuke for now. Maybe in a few more years I will be able to handle it better. For the meantime I will get a yanagiba and attempt to learn to use it. Yee-haw, let the good times roll.

Now if I can just stay home long enough to order one and be at the door to intercept it before someone else signs for it.