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bikehunter
02-22-2012, 08:43 PM
I'm among the world's worst artists, but my youngest granddaughter seems to have a true, innate talent. I've bought her paint tubes in the past, but I've depended on people at a top notch art store, which is, sadly, now gone. So I'm reduced to buying on line. She has decent brushes, palette, storage box which I bought for her in the past. Can any of you painters give me some advice on quality paints, brand names/suppliers, which don't break the bank?

joec
02-22-2012, 09:12 PM
I started out as a kid doing water color but went to acrylic paints before computers. The can be used like water, oil or even other methods. Fairly inexpensive and versital media that lasts. Works on paper, canvas or even cloth and is washable so not a mess to clean up. Here is the brand I prefered and even found them in some large discount stores art supply stores when I used them. http://www.aswexpress.com/discount-art-supplies/acrylic-paints.html. The only painting I've done in years is with a computer as you can see here. http://www.dizteq.com/joestuff/gallery.html

joec
02-22-2012, 09:13 PM
I started out as a kid doing water color but went to acrylic paints before computers. The can be used like water, oil or even other methods. Fairly inexpensive and versital media that lasts. Works on paper, canvas or even cloth and is washable so not a mess to clean up. Here is the brand I prefered and even found them in some large discount stores art supply stores when I used them. http://www.aswexpress.com/discount-art-supplies/acrylic-paints.html. I even did some bike art for a friend once with them and india inks. The only painting I've done in years is with a computer as you can see here. http://www.dizteq.com/joestuff/gallery.html

Johnny.B.Good
02-22-2012, 09:20 PM
I generally paint in oils and acrylics, but know a little bit about watercolors.

Dick Blick (http://www.dickblick.com/) is a reliable online retailer with a large selection and good prices (there are several brick and mortar stores a short distance from me, but I have shopped them online as well).

I use M. Graham (http://www.dickblick.com/products/m-graham-artists-watercolors/) artists' watercolors. M. Graham paints are high quality and reasonably priced (Winsor & Newton is extremely popular, though a bit more expensive). Always stay away from "student" watercolors (as opposed to the more expensive "artists'" grade). Artists' grade paints have more pigment, purer color, and are easier to work with. Blick also makes their own house line of paints, which I'm sure are of decent/good quality and would save you a few dollars.

I find it best to stick with one brand (particularly when it comes to watercolors, less so with oils/acrylics). If you know what she has (and she likes it), stick with that. "Cadmium red" (for example) can be found in every line, but it can vary considerably. And not all lines mix well with each other.

If you want advice about what colors to buy her, let me know. With a few good colors, you can mix an infinite number of others.

Hope this helps. Nice of you to encourage your granddaughter's talent.

Edit: I started out taking lessons in acrylics and like Joe, think it is a great medium. Not sure if your granddaughter has ever used them. Acrylics are for more "forgiving" than watercolors (with acrylics, one can paint right over the top of a mistake once it dries). Could be fun for her to try, however it would require all new brushes.

bikehunter
02-22-2012, 09:24 PM
Thanks, Joe. I knew there'd be some artists here. Beautiful computer work , but I think I want her to learn to paint with a brush first. ;-)

bikehunter
02-22-2012, 09:32 PM
I generally paint in oils and acrylics, but know a little bit about watercolors.

If you want advice about what colors to buy her, let me know. With a few good colors, you can mix an infinite number of others.

Hope this helps. Nice of you to encourage your granddaughter's talent.

Thanx, for the tips, Johnny B. I think people are crazy not to encourage youngsters, especially when the talent is so obvious.

Deckhand
02-22-2012, 09:34 PM
I generally paint in oils and acrylics, but know a little bit about watercolors.

Dick Blick (http://www.dickblick.com/) is a reliable online retailer with a large selection and good prices (there are several brick and mortar stores a short distance from me, but I have shopped them online as well).

I use M. Graham (http://www.dickblick.com/products/m-graham-artists-watercolors/) artists' watercolors. M. Graham paints are high quality and reasonably priced (Winsor & Newton is extremely popular, though a bit more expensive). Always stay away from "student" watercolors (as opposed to the more expensive "artists'" grade). Artists' grade paints have more pigment, purer color, and are easier to work with. Blick also makes their own house line of paints, which I'm sure are of decent/good quality and would save you a few dollars.

I find it best to stick with one brand (particularly when it comes to watercolors, less so with oils/acrylics). If you know what she has (and she likes it), stick with that. "Cadmium red" (for example) can be found in every line, but it can vary considerably. And not all lines mix well with each other.

If you want advice about what colors to buy her, let me know. With a few good colors, you can mix an infinite number of others.

Hope this helps. Nice of you to encourage your granddaughter's talent.

Ditto on the Winsor & Newton oil paints. I like them a lot. With oil you can do palette knife work too, like Van Gough. He used amazing color combinations that shouldn't work when you got up close and looked at them, but standing back it worked. If she uses canvas on frames, soak them in water and let them dry. The shrinkage will tighten up the canvas.
Acrylic paints have some bright and sharp colors and the advantage of drying quicker to put on finishing touches. I have waited two days on palette knife oil paint to do more work. If you need some oil paint I have some Winsor Newton, Winton oil color in the garage I can mail you, even a palette knife and some brushes. I was covering 20 square foot canvases a little color goes a long way just buy a big tube of white to mix it with. Any way if you need some oil paint supplies I can mail them.

joec
02-22-2012, 09:35 PM
Thanks, Joe. I knew there'd be some artists here. Beautiful computer work , but I think I want her to learn to paint with a brush first. ;-)

Its the best way and the way I learned also. I started with pencil first then went to charcoal, inks followed by watercolor, oils (which I hated) then acrylics as the best of both water color and oil.. Computers came late in life as the software finally caught up so one could actually paint with one.

Deckhand
02-22-2012, 09:38 PM
Its the best way and the way I learned also. I started with pencil first then went to charcoal, inks followed by watercolor, oils (which I hated) then acrylics as the best of both water color and oil.. Computers came late in life as the software finally caught up so one could actually paint with one.
Agree acrylics are the way to go.

bikehunter
02-22-2012, 09:46 PM
It's not like she has an instructor, tho' my daughter is looking into some classes soon. Are there books/DVDs which any of you would recommend? Acrylics seems to be the way to go, is she just as well off to practice her skills with watercolors, or just jump right into acrylics?

Deckhand
02-22-2012, 09:56 PM
It's not like she has an instructor, tho' my daughter is looking into some classes soon. Are there books/DVDs which any of you would recommend? Acrylics seems to be the way to go, is she just as well off to practice her skills with watercolors, or just jump right into acrylics?
Only my opinion, love acrylics. Have her let go of all fear turn on some music and just go for it. That is how I started. Letting go of fear of a mistake i did better work. There is always time to regiment and train later if it's necessary or desired.

joec
02-22-2012, 09:58 PM
It's not like she has an instructor, tho' my daughter is looking into some classes soon. Are there books/DVDs which any of you would recommend? Acrylics seems to be the way to go, is she just as well off to practice her skills with watercolors, or just jump right into acrylics?

Actually there is really little difference between water colors and acrylics as acrylics are easy to use like water colors. Now the get a bit harder when used like oil paints with the advantage of drying faster. When I started there was no such thing as video in any form so books worked for me. I started with simple art books as a kid and went from there to coping others work to see how close I could come. I then went to taking pictures and using them as something to paint. The one I did of the old truck is a good example, I did that using a picture of an old dodge truck in a junk yard to get the lines of it. The rest was added from my own mind and it is done to resemble water color or acrylic look and feel to it.

As for the books they make them on about every subject from people, animals, landscapes etc. They are generally easy to find and I've even seen them in stores like Sears, Walmart etc. most being paper back kind of like a scetch pad format. These might be a good place to start as I've had no formal lessons either just self taught. http://www.walterfoster.com/

Deckhand
02-22-2012, 10:02 PM
Actually there is really little difference between water colors and acrylics as acrylics are easy to use like water colors. Now the get a bit harder when used like oil paints with the advantage of drying faster. When I started there was no such thing as video in any form so books worked for me. I started with simple art books as a kid and went from there to coping others work to see how close I could come. I then went to taking pictures and using them as something to paint. The one I did of the old truck is a good example, I did that using a picture of an old dodge truck in a junk yard to get the lines of it. The rest was added from my own mind and it is done to resemble water color or acrylic look and feel to it.

As for the books they make them on about every subject from people, animals, landscapes etc. They are generally easy to find and I've even seen them in stores like Sears, Walmart etc. most being paper back kind of like a scetch pad format.

It's been awhile, four kids and leaving my oil paintings to dry didn't mix well. Those landscape books are really cool.

joec
02-22-2012, 10:04 PM
It's been awhile, four kids and leaving my oil paintings to dry didn't mix well. Those landscape books are really cool.

I can relate since I had 4 kids, 17 grand kids and as of yesterday 6 great grand kids. Hard to do hobbies with kids.

Deckhand
02-22-2012, 10:08 PM
I can relate since I had 4 kids, 17 grand kids and as of yesterday 6 great grand kids. Hard to do hobbies with kids.
But it is worth it when they run up and give you a hug. You are the most important thing in the world. Congratulations on another great grand kid. Hope to be there for that in my life.

Lucretia
02-22-2012, 10:25 PM
I've always had good luck ordering from Dick Blick (www.dickblick.com). One nice thing about them is that they list separte "student level" supplies. Nice things, but not as pricey as what pros would use. And most supplies are available in small sets so she can try out with some basic colors and materials.

I like Golden acrylics. Another thing she can do with acrylics--they have fixatives that you can mix with them and paint on fabric. She can make her own T-shirts.

Another thing she might like--water color pencils. You draw with the pencils then use a water-filled brush on the drawing to get a watercolor-like effect.

Art supplies are as bad as knifes as far as endless ways to spend $$$.

joec
02-22-2012, 10:26 PM
But it is worth it when they run up and give you a hug. You are the most important thing in the world. Congratulations on another great grand kid. Hope to be there for that in my life.

Careful what you wish for, retroactive birth control has crossed my mind on more than one occasion, especially in the teen years. :eyebrow:

Deckhand
02-22-2012, 10:34 PM
Careful what you wish for, retroactive birth control has crossed my mind on more than one occasion, especially in the teen years. :eyebrow:
LMAO I get that. They already have their moments.

bikehunter
02-22-2012, 10:35 PM
Wow, what great ideas and feedback. I guess I should bear in mind that Olivia is only 8 and has plenty of time for trial and error/mistakes. ;-)

joec
02-22-2012, 10:38 PM
Wow, what great ideas and feedback. I guess I should bear in mind that Olivia is only 8 and has plenty of time for trial and error/mistakes. ;-)

The way I learned was by free hand copying the pictures in the art books. Pick one subject to start and go with it till you have it. Learn to draw it first the painting will come over time. At least that was the way I did it. I also highly recommend if she has the talent keep her interested in it, even if she never does much with it as in a career it is still very relaxing for me to do now.

Johnny.B.Good
02-22-2012, 11:46 PM
I would hold off on investing in acrylic paints and brushes until Olivia can be enrolled in a class for beginners where she will be more likely to get off on the right foot.


Another thing she might like--water color pencils. You draw with the pencils then use a water-filled brush on the drawing to get a watercolor-like effect.

This is a great idea. Water color pencils and/or crayons are a lot of fun, and will help Olivia further develop her drawing skills. Paper is obviously less expensive than canvas, she can use them wet or dry, and they require no time to setup or put away. Good ones are not inexpensive, but they will last her a long time. I have these (http://www.dickblick.com/products/caran-dache-supracolor-soft-aquarelle-pencil-sets/) and these (http://www.dickblick.com/products/caran-dache-neocolor-ii-artists-crayons/). If you decide to go this route, you should also get her these (http://www.dickblick.com/products/aqua-flow-brush-set/).

Let us know what you decide to do.

joec
02-23-2012, 01:32 AM
I would hold off on investing in acrylic paints and brushes until Olivia can be enrolled in a class for beginners where she will be more likely to get off on the right foot.



This is a great idea. Water color pencils and/or crayons are a lot of fun, and will help Olivia further develop her drawing skills. Paper is obviously less expensive than canvas, she can use them wet or dry, and they require no time to setup or put away. Good ones are not inexpensive, but they will last her a long time. I have these (http://www.dickblick.com/products/caran-dache-supracolor-soft-aquarelle-pencil-sets/) and these (http://www.dickblick.com/products/caran-dache-neocolor-ii-artists-crayons/). If you decide to go this route, you should also get her these (http://www.dickblick.com/products/aqua-flow-brush-set/).

Let us know what you decide to do.

I pretty much agree as I didn't know the age at the time I suggest acrylics. Once I did I highly suggest the Drawing books for children and let them pick out the one they want to start with. Be it baby animals, horse, people etc. I drew till I was in my teens before I ever even considered painting. As for formal lesson those I would avoid for a good while as that tends to turn some kids off. Kind of like a parent pushing music lessons on a kid that looses interest in it over time. Color pencils, crayons etc would all work well also.

Johnny.B.Good
02-23-2012, 01:50 AM
I was a few years older than Olivia when I started taking lessons and working with acrylics, and it was my choice (it should be hers as well). I loved the woman that taught me as a child (a professional painter married to a very successful sculptor). There were a small number of us that would meet in her studio and just work on whatever we wanted under her watchful eye. She would usually demonstrate a technique for a few minutes at the start of each class, then set us loose to work on our own project. Always relaxed and supportive. It helps to have someone show you how to hold a brush properly, set up a palette, get your paint to a good consistency, mix colors, clean brushes, etc.

Deckhand
02-23-2012, 02:54 AM
I was a few years older than Olivia when I started taking lessons and working with acrylics, and it was my choice (it should be hers as well). I loved the woman that taught me as a child (a professional painter married to a very successful sculptor). There were a small number of us that would meet in her studio and just work on whatever we wanted under her watchful eye. She would usually demonstrate a technique for a few minutes at the start of each class, then set us loose to work on our own project. Always relaxed and supportive. It helps to have someone show you how to hold a brush properly, set up a palette, get your paint to a good consistency, mix colors, clean brushes, etc.
Very fortunate situation. That is really great.

bikehunter
02-23-2012, 12:35 PM
Thanks so much to everyone for the great advice. ;-)

Phip
02-26-2012, 01:38 PM
A few thoughts.
Favorite on line art supplier retailer: Daniel Smith in Seattle.
Good basic water colors: Winsor Newton student grade. Used them for many years and the paintings still look fresh.
I respectfully disagree with comments suggesting acrylics and water colors behave the same. Similar, yes, but with the different binders used, and I suspect different colorant grain sizes, watercolors exhibit very different behaviors at times. For instance, I've never seen acrylics that have pigment settle into the paper's texture like watercolor does.

Lucretia
02-29-2012, 10:36 AM
FYI, Dick Blick is having a 25% off sale with free shipping if you spend $150.

http://www.dickblick.com/emails/201202_2/

bikehunter
02-29-2012, 12:15 PM
Thanks for the heads up. ;-)