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View Full Version : Rader 10 inch Gyuto



Iceman91
02-29-2012, 06:12 PM
Just received my new toy. Its a 10 in Rader gyuto in 1086. Just thought you guys might want to see some pics.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/65555800@N08/6941611473/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/65555800@N08/6795504276/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/65555800@N08/6941620413/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/65555800@N08/6795515034/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/65555800@N08/6941622469/

I have only had it for a few hours but i cut up some potatoes and it cut very very well. Hardly any sticking. Sorry for the phone pics!

Mike

WillC
02-29-2012, 06:16 PM
Great looking knife, congratulations.:biggrin:

oivind_dahle
02-29-2012, 06:21 PM
I love Rader.

Deckhand
02-29-2012, 06:24 PM
Pics look fine. Great looking knife.

Candlejack
02-29-2012, 06:32 PM
I love that handle.

Pensacola Tiger
02-29-2012, 06:37 PM
Nice, very nice. Michael does really great work. Enjoy!

kalaeb
02-29-2012, 06:44 PM
Very nice, your custom specs? It does not look as tall as his gyutos usually do.

Iceman91
02-29-2012, 07:13 PM
Yea Michael's attention to detail is second to nobody. Fit and finish on this thing is totally flawless and Michael was a joy to work with. @ Kalaeb yes it is to my specs but I let Michael do his thing with it. All I asked was a nice convex grind, thin behind the edge, and a nice distal taper. This knife is pretty tall, i don't think as tall as some of his, but a lot taller than my Carter. The added height will take some getting use to.

Mike

mpukas
02-29-2012, 07:26 PM
Gorgeous knife - congrats and thanks for sharing!

I'm becoming less and less of a western handle fan, but I LOVE that handle.

bcrano
02-29-2012, 08:14 PM
JEEZ that's nice!

Michael Rader
02-29-2012, 08:19 PM
Very nice. Glad you like it.

-M

tgraypots
02-29-2012, 08:19 PM
sweet

AFKitchenknivesguy
02-29-2012, 08:23 PM
Completely jealous here.

EdipisReks
02-29-2012, 08:29 PM
nice knife!

El Pescador
02-29-2012, 08:30 PM
Nice.

Justin0505
02-29-2012, 08:45 PM
AWESOME! I am blown away every time I see one of his knives... and I have one hanging on my wall! Great work on the profile/ design. And that handle and integral bolster are just pure hotness. It's really not fair to call them western, they're really uniquely Rader.

hax9215
02-29-2012, 09:13 PM
Great looking knife, love that handle. :coolphotos: When I use a gyuto (french knife, to my thinking) I prefer some height and an upswept tip, but I am in the minority here.

Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!! :D

EdipisReks
02-29-2012, 09:17 PM
you aren't alone, has, as i often like a fairly high tip too, and i have some of my knives set up that way.

Iceman91
02-29-2012, 10:29 PM
Completely jealous here.

That says a lot coming from the guy with two Kramers haha.

Iceman91
02-29-2012, 10:30 PM
AWESOME! I am blown away every time I see one of his knives... and I have one hanging on my wall! Great work on the profile/ design. And that handle and integral bolster are just pure hotness. It's really not fair to call them western, they're really uniquely Rader.

I agree, I am not a huge fan of western handles, but i dont consider his western for some reason.

tk59
03-02-2012, 06:20 PM
Sweet-looking knife. Thanks for posting this. I'm looking forward to an eval after you've used it a while!

Michael Rader
03-02-2012, 09:46 PM
...I prefer ... an upswept tip...

Thanks guys. Let's talk about tips a bit if you don't mind:

I'm still -slowly- starting to understand the importance of many aspects of blade/edge geometry and profile, but the tip design is still one thing I have not fully grasped yet. To me, a casual user of my own knives, the tip is just there and regardless of whether it is flatter, or more upswept, I don't notice a difference... I just use it. So, tell me, when you guys are using a Gyuto/chef for hours a day, how does the tip shape/profile really help or hinder your work?

-M

Lefty
03-02-2012, 10:03 PM
Amazing knife as always! Rader's work is incredible to look at!
Not that I'm a pro, but the tip can sort of become a non-factor by being placed too high, and can also limit the use by being too low. It's a fine balance, and one that varies from person to person. I think this one looks goods :)

tk59
03-02-2012, 10:03 PM
If you point your tip down as you begin a forward cutting motion, it's nice to have an upswept tip so it doesn't embed in the board. It is also nice if you use the knife as a slicer to maximize the edge length. A flatter profile benefits those that tend to chop more or at least push/pull cut with smaller amount of rocking. More pointed tips are nice to have when doing finer work and you don't want to switch knives to a petty, for example.

heirkb
03-02-2012, 10:12 PM
If you point your tip down as you begin a forward cutting motion, it's nice to have an upswept tip so it doesn't embed in the board.

I had never thought of that, since no knife I've used has been that flat, but I can see how this would be a big problem. It'd be really annoying for me to cut with a knife that had too low/flat of a tip.

Andrew H
03-02-2012, 10:22 PM
If you point your tip down as you begin a forward cutting motion, it's nice to have an upswept tip so it doesn't embed in the board. It is also nice if you use the knife as a slicer to maximize the edge length. A flatter profile benefits those that tend to chop more or at least push/pull cut with smaller amount of rocking. More pointed tips are nice to have when doing finer work and you don't want to switch knives to a petty, for example.

Wouldn't the tip need to be very low (or the angle of attack extremely high) for this to be a problem?

tk59
03-02-2012, 10:38 PM
Wouldn't the tip need to be very low (or the angle of attack extremely high) for this to be a problem?Depends on the cut and the person making it. Some people think a Carter profile is too flat. A lot of people think a TKC or even KonHD are too curved.

Actually, I remember the one and only time I embeded my tip in a board. It was my Carter funi. Pesky was distracting me. Go figure.

Michael Rader
03-03-2012, 02:12 AM
Nice. Thanks guys. Fortunately, the tip profile is easy to modify so my customers can talk to me a bit about it before I forge and grind it in. That's an easy one.

Thanks for the comments. -M

ThEoRy
03-03-2012, 02:39 AM
Michael's work is truly exceptional. I really enjoyed my time in the pass around. If the opportunity ever comes up I would surely like to own one.

The Edge
03-03-2012, 02:58 AM
Amazing knife! I love your integrated bolsters and handles, truly exceptional work! Going to have to add one to my arsenal sometime soon.

Mingooch
03-03-2012, 11:06 PM
Beautiful work, might have to order one of those in the future.

mpukas
03-04-2012, 02:49 PM
Wouldn't the tip need to be very low (or the angle of attack extremely high) for this to be a problem?

One of my first J-knives was a moritaka kiri-gyuto, which has a very flat profile for the entire length. There's a slight upward curve at the tip for about the last 1/3 - 1/4 of the blade, but not more than a 1/4" if that. Rock chopping was impossible - puch cutting and slicing only.

When I first used it I was using my old techniques developed from years of using a 12" Wusthoff, and I embedded the tip in the board so many times - my board has gouges in it as a reminder. I broke the tip off the knife (not from embedding the tip, but from trying to find the balance point - the knife rocked forward on it's side and hit the tip sideways and it snapped off a couple mm) and when I ground it to reshape the tip I added a bit more curve to get the tip a little higher. More user friendly now for some tasks.

For me, again it's personal from one to the next, there's a sweet spot for how much curve the tip has and how high it is off of the board. Too high like current German profiles suck. Too flat sucks too. I think the classic Sab and KS profiles are about ideal for my taste.

Although it's a little hard for me to see the profile of Michael's knife in this thread due to the angle of the pics, I think this profile is nearly spot-on! The only thing I'd consider adding is a flat spot from the tip back towards the curve up from the main edge - A completely cureved tip is only good for rock chopping in the current food media fashion. Having a flat spot near the tip allows the tip to be used for fine mincing, chopping, dicing, push cutting, etc what ever you want to call it.

Michael Rader
03-04-2012, 02:56 PM
Hmmm. Very good. Thanks.

-M

EdipisReks
03-04-2012, 06:37 PM
If you point your tip down as you begin a forward cutting motion, it's nice to have an upswept tip so it doesn't embed in the board. It is also nice if you use the knife as a slicer to maximize the edge length. A flatter profile benefits those that tend to chop more or at least push/pull cut with smaller amount of rocking. More pointed tips are nice to have when doing finer work and you don't want to switch knives to a petty, for example.

x2

Iceman91
03-05-2012, 11:54 AM
I am much more used to a flatter, lower tip. My go to knife is a 240 Carter funy. I didn't want my Rader to be a replica of any of my other knives, i wanted something different. So i didn't think that i would like the upswept tip as much, and i didn't really think it would be as useful. I still havent used the Rader a whole lot yet. Work has been so busy that i havent wanted to have it get beat up there quite yet. I have just been using it at home for the past week and i am enjoying the tip on it just as much as the carter. This knife has been really great to use, it is so much bigger than what i am used to, but it still glides through food really well. I think once i get more practice in with it, it will be my go to knife.

Mike

Michael Rader
03-05-2012, 01:39 PM
Thanks Mike. Been a pleasure.
-M