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View Full Version : Apologies to the purists



Keith Neal
03-03-2012, 07:01 PM
I tried to learn to appreciate patina. But the knives from Dave and Randy are simply too georgous to do it. I posted the Patina on Dave's gyuto, but I had to polish it out.

http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m580/nealkeith/Marterllpolished.jpg

And Randy is after me to let patina develop on tha Galaxy knife.

I just can't do it. Perhaps in time I will learn to appreciate patina. But for now, the knives these guys have built for me are too pretty to let it happen. They have spent so much time and effort to provide the perfect finish.

Maybe I will learn.

Keith

tk59
03-03-2012, 07:07 PM
Hey, I didn't particularly like patina either but it's growing on me. The flip side of it is you know you are wearing away your precious blade every time you polish it, haha.:sad0:

Lefty
03-03-2012, 07:27 PM
Patina is part of the charm of a carbon knife, if you ask me. But hey, if you ask you, it isn't. That's cool by me. I have to admit, it does look damned good all polished up like that!

Keith Neal
03-03-2012, 07:30 PM
Randy recommended Renaissance wax, which is my solution now. We'll see how that works.

I'm new to this obsession, so perhaps I will learn. I have always endeavored to keep tools in perfect, new condition. Patina hurts my head.

K

Chifunda
03-03-2012, 08:17 PM
Eye of the beholder and all that. Personally, I view a nicely developed patina as a badge of honorable service...but shiny doesn't offend me.

The hekler
03-03-2012, 08:45 PM
It's your knife keep it looking however you want but I love a nice patina... Let's me know the knife is a tool that is being used not a display item and I love how the patina is constantly changing, but that's just me.

obtuse
03-03-2012, 08:48 PM
sounds like Dave needs to start making some nice stainless knives :)

Seth
03-03-2012, 11:44 PM
I was once told that Renaissance is a partly synthetic wax. I love the finish it creates on wood. I have been finishing some of my knife handles with a penetrating oil (Danish) and finally this wax. So my question is are you using this on the blade?

memorael
03-04-2012, 12:14 AM
I would suggest you stray from carbon knives. LOTS of shiny stainless knives around which won't discolor food, unless you don't intend to use the carbon knives.

RRLOVER
03-04-2012, 12:41 AM
Randy recommended Renaissance wax, which is my solution now. We'll see how that works.

I'm new to this obsession, so perhaps I will learn. I have always endeavored to keep tools in perfect, new condition. Patina hurts my head.

K

I use renaissance wax on my handles and it has a god awful stink to it,I personally would not want it on my blade.

Sarge
03-04-2012, 09:37 AM
I would suggest you stray from carbon knives. LOTS of shiny stainless knives around which won't discolor food, unless you don't intend to use the carbon knives.

Or avoid cutting acidic food with it.

dough
03-04-2012, 10:07 AM
patina acts to protect the blade in a way. if you are cutting a lot of food in a day certain foods will stain because you have not formed a patina in particular acidic foods.

i guess if you have enough time to keep whipping down the blade to keep it in unused condition then you may not cut enough food that it is ever a problem. some steels are more reactive then others though and have more need for a patina... the martell knife i own sports a lovely patina but i could see how you might be able to get away keeping it shiny as the O1 is not the most reactive carbon i have experienced.

Keith Neal
03-05-2012, 08:26 AM
Once cleaned up and the the blade polished with wax, it seems to keep the blade protected from patina and corrosion, though I don't use a knife as much as many of you do. I like the edge I get on carbon steel, so plan to stick with it. I can't detect any odor on blade or food after I have wiped the excess wax off. So far, so good. I don't want to have to polish down to bare steel every time I use the knife, so the wax is essential. If it works over the long term, I'll be happy. If not, I'll let y'all know.

Keith Neal
03-18-2012, 09:09 AM
OK. I give. After waxing the blade several times, I halved a few lemons and got a significant amount of patina. So I figured I might as well accept it and get on with it. Impatient to see it develop, but still wanting a natural effect, I put mustard on a lemon and sliced it -- without having removed the wax. Here is the result.

http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m580/nealkeith/Martellpatina-1.jpg

I am learning to love patina.

HHH Knives
03-18-2012, 09:14 AM
Nice! I for one, really like the look of a patina! It sort of tells a story! and give the knife personality! Not to mentions some of the patinas look so cool!!! :)

Dave Martell
03-18-2012, 01:11 PM
Wow that's a unique patina look Keith. :thumbsup:

aaronsgibson
03-18-2012, 02:14 PM
I'm all for a shinny blade, but when it comes to carbon, all of mine sport there patina with pride. Hell, I had my kono suji for about a month and the damn thing is VERY dark. Like many have said, patina is the blades history of what its been through.

skewed
03-18-2012, 04:46 PM
OK. I give.

I am learning to love patina.

Bravo! I was going to suggest picking up an inexpensive carbon blade to ease you into enjoying a nice patina. Glad to hear that you have taken the plunge.

A natural patina is an abstract road map of where the knife has been. It is uniquely you. Stainless blades just are not able to tell a story like a carbon blade can. I personally only use SS as a utility knife at times when I might have a tough time wiping a knife down after using it.

BTW- great looking knife! Even better with some character added!

Slainte,
rj

SpikeC
03-18-2012, 05:38 PM
I think that looks great!

Tristan
03-19-2012, 01:28 AM
I love the metallic purple blues. I hear you get them from meat. But I've given up on my carbonext ever getting fully patinaed. It is kind of cloudy now. I use my masamoto for veg so less patina going on there as I avoid acidic foods mostly. I might have to force something soon...

jwpark
03-19-2012, 08:39 PM
I really don't know why Dave bothers to put such a nice finish on knife that's gonna get a lot of patina. :knife: