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AFKitchenknivesguy
03-06-2012, 08:22 PM
Always have wanted one, have looked at other Kamado grills like Primo as well. What do you all think? Ace Hardware here as the x-large priced at $1229.00. Might have to sell some knives to afford that now.

Crothcipt
03-06-2012, 08:29 PM
I'm sure if you plan a trip to Denver and look in some mid-easter, Indian market you can find one for a couple hundred bucks. It will probably be bigger and you won't break the bank. (it has been about 10 years since I have been to Denver so not sure if there is one there.) More likely Buolder.

Kyle
03-06-2012, 08:32 PM
My BGE is my pride and joy. I like to say that I'd give up the roof over my head and push my BGE around in a shopping cart before I gave it up. Get it, you won't regret it.

For $1229 does it include the nest (rolling cart) or any other accessories? I don't think that's a good deal for just the XL Egg by itself, but I haven't priced out an XL in a while.

Also, how many people do you think you'll cook for? I get along just fine with my Large Egg. The XL is very spacious, but it's also consumes more fuel and is more difficult to heat up to high temps for steaks and pizza. It also makes it difficult to justify firiing it up on a weeknight for steaks for just you and one other person. I typically advocate getting the biggest cooker you can afford, but if you don't have a big family I'd consider going with the Large.

As for Primo vs BGE, it doesn't really matter. They're both well built and perform the same, just go ahead and pick whatever you can get a better deal on or with the one that fits your backyard decor better. :doublethumbsup:

El Pescador
03-06-2012, 08:33 PM
BGE-worth it.

mhlee
03-06-2012, 08:43 PM
My BGE is my pride and joy. I like to say that I'd give up the roof over my head and push my BGE around in a shopping cart before I gave it up. Get it, you won't regret it.

For $1229 does it include the nest (rolling cart) or any other accessories? I don't think that's a good deal for just the XL Egg by itself, but I haven't priced out an XL in a while.

Also, how many people do you think you'll cook for? I get along just fine with my Large Egg. The XL is very spacious, but it's also consumes more fuel and is more difficult to heat up to high temps for steaks and pizza. It also makes it difficult to justify firiing it up on a weeknight for steaks for just you and one other person. I typically advocate getting the biggest cooker you can afford, but if you don't have a big family I'd consider going with the Large.

+1

I have an XL. I got it once used at the SoCal Eggfest. It's been great for long cooks like brisket, pork butts, etc. However, like Kyle noted, it takes a LOT of fuel and time to get it up to temp.

I don't regret getting it, but if you're looking for one to use weekly (or even more often), I would have to recommend getting a Large. In fact, I'm considering getting a Large myself because the XL is really best for large groups of people, cooking multiple batches, or long cooks.

I would look for Eggfests in Colorado. Most will sell once used BGEs at a great discount. All you usually have to do is prepay, and pick up at the end of the Eggfest.

markk
03-06-2012, 09:40 PM
I have a large BGE and have had it for about 8 years now. Best investment in a grill/smoker/oven I could have imagined. As said before, the XL is really big. I routinely cook for 4-6 and have never needed more than the large. There are also some pretty nice aftermarket accessories that add the ability to have multiple grill racks at different heights. I use mine year round and the ceramic is great for use in cold or hot weather. I have done ~20lbs of pork butt on it at a time with no trouble. I cannot recommend one enough if you enjoy cooking outside.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-06-2012, 10:44 PM
I see what you mean, it does have quite a large bottom indicating a lot of charcoal needed. When I get the money, I will probably go the large route. I love cooking outside, and this has been on my short list for a long time. Other things keep popping up, go figure.

Jim
03-06-2012, 10:51 PM
I want a mini for quick dinners for just the two of us.

UCChemE05
03-06-2012, 10:54 PM
Anyone want to sell their BGE :-D


I've always wanted one but it'll be a while before I could convince my wife... Especially since I already have a great SS Weber

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-06-2012, 10:55 PM
That mini looks pretty cool. I'd buy a used one online but I would hate to see what the shipping cost.

Deckhand
03-06-2012, 10:57 PM
+1

I have an XL. I got it once used at the SoCal Eggfest. It's been great for long cooks like brisket, pork butts, etc. However, like Kyle noted, it takes a LOT of fuel and time to get it up to temp.

I don't regret getting it, but if you're looking for one to use weekly (or even more often), I would have to recommend getting a Large. In fact, I'm considering getting a Large myself because the XL is really best for large groups of people, cooking multiple batches, or long cooks.

I would look for Eggfests in Colorado. Most will sell once used BGEs at a great discount. All you usually have to do is prepay, and pick up at the end of the Eggfest.

The eggfest comment was great advice. I see they offer a discount.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-06-2012, 10:59 PM
Only problem with Eggfest is timing. Apparently there is one in August in Colorado, question is do I want to wait that long.

ejd53
03-06-2012, 11:20 PM
I absolutely love mine. I use it for everything from cooking Pizza to smoking ribs and brisket (and there's nothing like being able to do some steaks at 700 degrees). :doublethumbsup:

lowercasebill
03-06-2012, 11:41 PM
i have a large and a mini .. and for the price of an xl you can get a large and a small [or mini] unless you are cooking for large groups often, the large is a better choice than the xl imho. buying at an egg fest is the best deal . i am off to the sunshine fest but please feel free to email me .. my oven only gets used for lasagna and cookies both of which can be done on the egg. traditional bbq at low temps with no need to reload.. to pizza at almost 1000 degrees and everything in between .. juiciest chicken you will ever eat ,, and once you get the hang of it you can make a choice costco ribeye to rival mortons or seafire. real late for bed and leaving town at 0400 thursday be happy to answer any questions when i get back do check out http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&Itemid=112&func=showcat&catid=1&id=1217983#1217983

Bulldogbacchus
03-06-2012, 11:50 PM
I have a large and an XL. Had the large for four years before buying the XL. I love them both, but use the XL a lot more than the large. You must cut up three slabs of baby backs and use a rack to get them on the L. Three racks will lie flat on the XL without a problem. You really can't go wrong with either though.

jmforge
03-07-2012, 12:16 AM
my brother has a BGE, not sure if it is the large or the XL, but the thing would probably get up to forging heat but for the gasket melting above say 1000F. :doublethumbsup:

Jim
03-07-2012, 12:42 AM
This guy has a large selection and good service. Not sure about shipping but worth a look.

http://www.fredsmusicandbbq.com/CERAMIC_GRILL_SUPERSTORE_s/270.htm

Kyle
03-07-2012, 12:57 AM
This guy has a large selection and good service. Not sure about shipping but worth a look.

http://www.fredsmusicandbbq.com/CERAMIC_GRILL_SUPERSTORE_s/270.htm

Fred's is great, but I know for a fact he won't sell over the internet. BGE will not honor their warranty for internet sellers. That said, they are very good at keeping the pricing consistent between dealers, so you're unlikely to find any incredible deals save for a yearly sale or going out of business clearance. Your best bet for a good deal on a BGE is an Eggfest as mentioned before, especially because they come with a full warranty as if you bought it new.


I want a mini for quick dinners for just the two of us.



I used to want a mini for quick dinners, but I think I've decided on a Small for a 2nd Egg. It's just as easy to use but much more versatile and because apparently it's the best Egg to have for pizzas because it's small size and more traditional kamado shape (compared to the mini) makes it a little blast furnace.

sw2geeks
03-07-2012, 01:17 AM
I'm a Treager guy myself (have two), but I have thought about getting a little egg to play with.

Customfan
03-07-2012, 01:51 AM
I've been looking at the BGE for a while.. I don't know what I am waiting for... this post might have pushed me over the fence! :pirate1:

mhlee
03-07-2012, 12:26 PM
I used to want a mini for quick dinners, but I think I've decided on a Small for a 2nd Egg. It's just as easy to
use but much more versatile and because apparently it's the best Egg to have for pizzas because it's small size and more traditional kamado shape (compared to the mini) makes it a little blast furnace.

A small? Really? I'm surprised that its the best for pizza because the grid is only 13 inches in diameter. Most pizza stones are at least 15 inches in diameter.

rahimlee54
03-07-2012, 07:09 PM
I got one after a couple years of wanting it, and it is awesome. I found mine on craiglist for about half price. The used sales are few and far between however. It is alot of money to put down, but cant you get by with ten knives instead of 15?

slowtyper
03-07-2012, 08:57 PM
For those in Canada they have them at costco now, around $899? Would totally get one if I didn't live in an apartment...

Duckfat
03-08-2012, 11:39 AM
The BGE may be the single best cooking tool I ever bought. Love it. Hard to imagine life with out one. There are other ceramic cookers as well like the Primos or Grill Dome. I've had my BGE for several years and it's never let me down even in the dead of Winter. If you do hi-temp cooking they offer a hi-temp gasket now. Works like a charm.

Dave

UCChemE05
03-08-2012, 12:41 PM
I spoke with my wife last nigth about getting a BGE... lets just say it did not turn out positively for a BGE in my household at this time. I'm going to have to keept an eye out on Craigslist...

Bulldogbacchus
03-08-2012, 12:49 PM
My large wok works well on the large egg. It heats it perfectly. It will get a certain amount of attention amongst grillers when you pull out a wok......

wadeatl
03-08-2012, 08:13 PM
I am a huge ceramic cooking fan and have one Primo Oval and one Small BGE ... take a look at the Oval vs the Large or XL BGE. It allows you to do indirect grilling plus way more capacity if you are doing a bunch or ribs, butts or briskets.

I use the SM BGE 80% of the time when I am just grilling for my wife and I ... but when friends are over, want to spatchcock a chicken or cook 80lbs of butt I go to the Primo Oval.

Either way this purchase will change your world!

Good Luck

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-08-2012, 09:07 PM
Large BGE in the back of my truck, pics to follow.

Deckhand
03-08-2012, 09:08 PM
Large BGE in the back of my truck, pics to follow.
Awesome! Congratulations!

UCChemE05
03-08-2012, 09:14 PM
Don't drop it :justkidding:

Duckfat
03-08-2012, 09:24 PM
Large BGE in the back of my truck, pics to follow.

Congrats!

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-08-2012, 09:36 PM
http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss35/jherm77/BGE001.jpg

http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss35/jherm77/BGE002.jpg

http://i559.photobucket.com/albums/ss35/jherm77/BGE003.jpg

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-08-2012, 09:37 PM
That was a ***** getting it out of my truck and into the nest. Nuckin futs I am.

Bishopmaker
03-08-2012, 09:57 PM
My dad got his awhile back and loves it. Says it is a whole new experience.

Kyle
03-08-2012, 10:13 PM
So awesome, they're so pretty when new, but not for long. The plate setter is going to be essential if you want to do low and slow BBQ and pizza!

Kyle
03-08-2012, 10:17 PM
Oh yeah, and Royal Oak is a great lump and easily found at Wal Mart for cheap. The large BGE lump is supposedly just re-branded Royal Oak.

I use these to get the Egg lit, works like a charm every single time. Don't worry about a chimney, those are for briquettes in a Weber. Starter cubes are the way to go.

http://www.amazon.com/Rutland-50B-Prod-Firestarter/dp/B00138MO16/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331259300&sr=8-1

Or if you wanna go with a more badass lighting method you can invest in a MAPP torch kit (not propane) from Home Depot or Lowe's. Supposedly gets the coals lit in seconds and ready to cook in minutes.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202185045/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=mapp%20torch&storeId=10051

Sorry if you know all this, just trying to pass on some info to a fellow Egghead! :)

markk
03-08-2012, 10:18 PM
the ceramic grill store has all the accessories you will ever need. I can personally recommend the large adjustable rig and the spider as very useful. I keep the large adjustable rig in my egg all the time and the flexibility of the multi levels is great.

markk
03-08-2012, 10:20 PM
I can attest the to the MAPP torch method of lighting the coals. works like a charm.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-08-2012, 10:25 PM
Oh yeah, and Royal Oak is a great lump and easily found at Wal Mart for cheap. The large BGE lump is supposedly just re-branded Royal Oak.

I use these to get the Egg lit, works like a charm every single time. Don't worry about a chimney, those are for briquettes in a Weber. Starter cubes are the way to go.

http://www.amazon.com/Rutland-50B-Prod-Firestarter/dp/B00138MO16/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331259300&sr=8-1

Or if you wanna go with a more badass lighting method you can invest in a MAPP torch kit (not propane) from Home Depot or Lowe's. Supposedly gets the coals lit in seconds and ready to cook in minutes.

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202185045/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10053&langId=-1&keyword=mapp%20torch&storeId=10051

Sorry if you know all this, just trying to pass on some info to a fellow Egghead! :)

I bought those starters at ACE!

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-08-2012, 10:28 PM
So awesome, they're so pretty when new, but not for long. The plate setter is going to be essential if you want to do low and slow BBQ and pizza!

They ran out of the plate setter for large, supposedly getting it in again in a couple of days. That, and a round pizza stone are my buys. A buddy of mine owes me a favor, I might ask him to make me a wooden table fitted for the BGE with casters.

UCChemE05
03-08-2012, 10:38 PM
Very nice indeed. How much did it set you back with the stand?

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-08-2012, 10:42 PM
Set me back, with tax around $1K. They threw in a free ash collector :)

Kyle
03-08-2012, 11:26 PM
They ran out of the plate setter for large, supposedly getting it in again in a couple of days. That, and a round pizza stone are my buys. A buddy of mine owes me a favor, I might ask him to make me a wooden table fitted for the BGE with casters.

Watch out for thin stones from big box stores, they're made for your oven and tend to crack at higher temperatures. The BGE stone is expensive but very thick. However, if you keep your plate setter clean you can just cook pizza on that instead of buying a separate pizza stone.

Bulldogbacchus
03-08-2012, 11:40 PM
Congratulations on your egg.

Duckfat
03-09-2012, 10:45 AM
That was a ***** getting it out of my truck and into the nest. Nuckin futs I am.

Wow you didn't move it put together did you? If so that must have been a beeech. They are not that bad to move at all when you take the top off. I'd hate to move one put together for fear of the lid bouncing and cracking. I also use the RO lump from Wally World.

Dave

mhlee
03-09-2012, 12:55 PM
Nice buy!

Although I haven't bought from them, ceramic grill store has accessories that seem to be better than the BGE accessories. One thing I have not liked about my platesetter is the fact that it seems to restrict smoke flow because the arms are so thick.

I probably would not have bought the BGE XL platesetter had I found that website first. It's worth a look.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-09-2012, 12:57 PM
Dave,

ACE hardware put it together for me, which they encourage to make sure all the pieces are there and to fix any problems on the spot. I strapped it in with tie downs in my pick-up bed, out of the next. I am a pretty strong guy, but the weight combined with the awkwardness of the egg was the hard part. It was fully put together when I moved it. Good times.

mhlee
03-09-2012, 01:11 PM
So, what will be maiden cook on the BGE?

Most owners and dealers recommend doing a low to medium cook to break in an egg.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-09-2012, 01:21 PM
I am thinking about some dry rubbed chicken thighs and legs, and a pork tenderloin. I really need that plate setter, it's limiting my options :curse:

Mint427
03-09-2012, 01:49 PM
My brother and I use our Egg all the time. He turned me onto Ono Hawaiian charcoal which I think burns cleaner, hotter and lasts longer. It's the best cooker/smoker that I've ever used - have fun!! P.S. - there are lots of recipes on line for whatever you want to cook.

Duckfat
03-09-2012, 02:07 PM
Jason, If you ever need to move it again the lid is easy to remove and it makes life a lot easier. You should have received a plastic stop for the hinge should you ever need to remove that. I know there's no way I could have carried a large BGE up my deck. You will indeed want a plate setter for slow cooks like brisket or pulled pig. There is some bad news. Once you get used to high temp cooking, sear a few steaks and perfect your technique you won't ever be able to eat a steak at a restaurant ever again! :hungry:
What I do with my charcoal is dump a bag in a large plastic bin I bought at Wally World. I load the larger pieces on the bottom of the BGE and then progress to the smaller pieces on the top of the load. Using the tub to sort the lump makes that easy. When your starting cooking out remember to "burp" the unit by opening the daisy wheel and the bottom vent to let it breath before you open the lid. Do this any time you are cooking on fresh charcoal. If you get flashback even once you probably won't ever forget again. Be sure to check out the web site at the Mothership and look for The Naked Whiz site for recipes, charcoal reviews, instructions etc.


Dave

WildBoar
03-09-2012, 02:17 PM
You guys are really killing me here. I sense I will be spending some good artisan knife money soon on one of these. I'm all for something that will allow quick (and very hot) sear as well as a nice long sloooooooow cooking w/ little fussing.

mhlee
03-09-2012, 03:07 PM
I am thinking about some dry rubbed chicken thighs and legs, and a pork tenderloin. I really need that plate setter, it's limiting my options :curse:

Actually, I think for those dishes you don't need a platesetter. Just work up the temp slow (always harder to bring it down to temp than raise it because you're trying to cool down all that mass vs. simply giving more air to the fuel), and once you get it to a good temp, just leave the bottom door just slightly cracked (about 1/2 cm) and leave the top completely open. Monitor it for a few minutes to see if the temp changes. If not, start cooking!

SpikeC
03-09-2012, 06:30 PM
I use Lazzari mesquite charcoal in my Egg, it is very inexpensive at the local resto supply in 40# bags, around 13 bucks.
If you don't have a plate setter, an 18 inch round grill and 4 firebricks will do the same job.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-11-2012, 11:09 PM
I apologize up front, I forgot to take pics. Did my first batch on the BGE, boneless chicken thighs with Sate seasoning, chicken breast on bone with herbs de provence, and pork tenderloin with a home made spicy seasoning on ceder plank. Everything turned out wonderful and cooked perfectly. I cannot believe how well this retains consistant heat. Small increments in the top kept my BGE at 350F for 1hr+. If I weren't doing relatively quick cooking meats, I wonder how long it would last. Next week is pulled pork, pics promised.

BTW, the cast iron removeable vent broke when I opened the top and forgot I had it up there. Don't like the fact you have to remove it everytime you open the lid, if you multitask like me it's easy to forget. It still works, but the piece that broke off held the handle. Beginners mistake?

SpikeC
03-11-2012, 11:21 PM
Do you have the daisy wheel?

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-12-2012, 12:51 AM
Do you have the daisy wheel?

Yup

Duckfat
03-12-2012, 10:07 AM
I apologize up front, I forgot to take pics. Did my first batch on the BGE, boneless chicken thighs with Sate seasoning, chicken breast on bone with herbs de provence, and pork tenderloin with a home made spicy seasoning on ceder plank. Everything turned out wonderful and cooked perfectly. I cannot believe how well this retains consistant heat. Small increments in the top kept my BGE at 350F for 1hr+. If I weren't doing relatively quick cooking meats, I wonder how long it would last. Next week is pulled pork, pics promised.

BTW, the cast iron removeable vent broke when I opened the top and forgot I had it up there. Don't like the fact you have to remove it everytime you open the lid, if you multitask like me it's easy to forget. It still works, but the piece that broke off held the handle. Beginners mistake?



You do not have to remove the Daisy wheel when you open the lid. If it came off then there is a problem. Make sure your lid is installed properly. Put a dollar bill or thick piece of paper between the lid and base then close it. Try sliding to bill. Do this all the way around. If the bill slides side ways then you need to adjust the lid. The Daisy wheel is a little loose until you run a few bags of charcoal through the unit but unless you really pop the lid open hard or fast the top should never come off. It's made of cast iron so the weight alone should hold it there under normal use. If you pop the lid hard or fast enough for the Daisy Wheel to come off you are abusing the hinge. Chalk it up to the learning curve but once the BGE is run in the top won't come off nearly as easy.
Your lump burn time is going to vary a lot from brand to brand but I can do a 20 hour slow cook (wally world RO) and still have enough charcoal left for another burn.
Before you do pulled pig do yourself a favor and pick up a Polder thermometer. You don't want to have to keep opening the lid and this will also allow you to see when you started the conversion process and how long you have been in that stage by looking at previous high temp and seeing when the temp started to drop vs the current time/temp.

Dave

BTW Try contacting the Mothership directly through the BGE web site. Unless you dropped the Daisy wheel on concrete from a high place it shouldn't have broke. It doesn't hurt to ask if they will warrant that on a new purchase and if they cover it they will ship it to you direct free of charge.

Bulldogbacchus
03-12-2012, 11:59 AM
Pork shoulder.....12 hours at 200....it will be awesome.
BTW, be sure and check your thermometer.....mine was off by 50 degrees. Stick the end in boiling water.....turn bezel until your about 210......its easy.

Duckfat
03-12-2012, 02:22 PM
There's going to be a LOT of variables but with a large BGE and 2- 8# bone in shoulders I'm running a solid 18 hours on a slow cook (230 dome temp) to get through the conversion process. That process for me is just starting at 12 hours and takes a solid 6 hours to complete. This is where a Polder thermometer ($30 ish) is worth its weight in Gold. Many folks just cook to internal temperature with a traditional thermometer and while I'm sure the Pork is great they often miss the real beauty of the slow cooking process. After the internal temp hits 180 or so the conversion process begins and then the temp will drop back down to roughly 165. If you pull at 185 on the first temp spike you miss the conversion process. This is good for slicing or chopped pork or just can't wait any longer! :hungry: The flip side of that is letting the internal temp go all the way back up to 195+ after the conversion process is complete. That takes 20+ hours for me and Pork, at least to my taste gets overly soft.
The whole process of converting collagen to gelatin is the same principal behind slow cooking prime rib in an Alto Sham. Those who want to read more on that process may want to grab a copy of "On Food and Cooking" by Harold McGee.

SpikeC
03-12-2012, 02:24 PM
What Duckfat said. +1

lowercasebill
03-12-2012, 02:33 PM
well congratuations.. sorry to hear you broke the dmft. you do not have to remove it when you open the dome. if it is loose get a piece of gasket material from your dealer and put it on the inside of the dmft . do go to greeneggers.com and look around you can ask all your questions. there. if you look at the posts from the sunshine fest i am the one with the red white and blue doo rag. as far as charcoal.. i prefer humpreys , careful with royal oak they have several types and the ones from southamerica suck [imho] make sure to read the fine print on the side for country of origin and for all things egg including reviews of every lump on the market go here http://www.nakedwhiz.com/dogfront.htm and read everything and familiarize yourself with the site. great recipes, instuctions for just about everything related to your bge and answers to all the common questions.
always place the rivet that holds the daisy wheel toward the front of the egg so when you open the dome it does not change position .
feel free to email if you need help

Bulldogbacchus
03-12-2012, 07:27 PM
Those who want to read more on that process may want to grab a copy of "On Food and Cooking" by Harold McGee.

I would be one of those. I ordered the book, and I look forward to reading it. Maybe I've been missing out on something all along.


"That takes 20+ hours for me and Pork, at least to my taste gets overly soft."

I'm confused. Does this mean you do not care for it when its cooked this long?

Duckfat
03-13-2012, 10:17 AM
BullDog,
I doubt you've been missing any thing but the science behind cooking can be very interesting. I really do consider Harold McGee a must have book for any one really interested in food/cooking.
I myself do not care for pork if I run a full 20 hours+ and bring it back up to 195+ after the conversion process. Others may disagree. I would say the very same thing about a 12 hour slow burn. That's not quite long enough for me but BBQ is a very regional thing and subject to each persons taste. In many areas 12 hours would be just dandy because chopping the pig is considered the norm. For true pulled pig I find I need 18 hours or to remove most variables I need to come back up to 185 after the conversion process.
I want to be able to easily be able to pull the pork by hand but I still want to have some tooth.
I hope that helps. It's just starting to get nice here so my first slow cook of the season will be in the next week or so. I grabbed a nice packer brisket the other day.
Lowercase bill did you have a link to the thread with the photos?

Dave

mhlee
03-13-2012, 10:53 AM
After the internal temp hits 180 or so the conversion process begins and then the temp will drop back down to roughly 165. If you pull at 185 on the first temp spike you miss the conversion process. The flip side of that is letting the internal temp go all the way back up to 195+ after the conversion process is complete. The whole process of converting collagen to gelatin is the same principal behind slow cooking prime rib in an Alto Sham. Those who want to read more on that process may want to grab a copy of "On Food and Cooking" by Harold McGee.

Interesting. When I started cooking barbecue, I did multiple controlled tests for pork shoulders in a temperature verified (by separate thermometer) oven (mine is a DCS) at various temperatures, checked at 15 to 30 minute intervals (or more often) and NEVER saw a drop in temperature of anything close to 15 degrees. In fact, although the temperature did stall between 160 and 170 for, IIRC as I don't have my spreadsheet in front of me, for a few hours, the temperature was linear - there was no drop in temperature. The temperature did stall, but never dropped. In fact, I don't understand how something could drop temperature that significantly, even when collagen is converting into gelatin. Stall, I can understand. Drop 15 degrees? That does not make sense to me. And IIRC, even McGee notes that the temperature will stall, but not drop.

Chifunda
03-13-2012, 12:19 PM
I monitor the internal temperature of my pork butts throughout the smoking process and have never observed a drop in temperature...that maddening stall, yes. But never a drop. Interesting article on the stall phenomenon and what causes it at http://www.amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/the_stall.html

By the way, if you don't have one of these 5247 I urge you to consider one. Maverick ET-732 Wireless Thermometer allows you to monitor both the temperature of your grill and the internal temp of whatever you're cooking and do it from a remote location. I can be anywhere in the house or in my shop and know exactly what's going on inside my smoker.

Andrew H
03-13-2012, 12:21 PM
And IIRC, even McGee notes that the temperature will stall, but not drop.

That's what I remember also.

Kyle
03-13-2012, 12:25 PM
Yeah, I have never, ever seen a drop in temp. I try not to overthink BBQ too much; it's not fine dining, it's a way to turn fatty, cheap cuts of meat into something incredible. I monitor internal temp to get a basic idea of how far along the cook is, but when the bone in the butt starts to come out with a slight tug then I take it out of the pit. On my Egg this usually only takes 1 hour per pound. I've never needed these 16+ hour cooks, or even a 12 hour cook. I keep it steady at 250* and it always pulls easily while still remaining "toothy" with good chunks of meat, not shredded to oblivion and back.

Duckfat
03-13-2012, 03:43 PM
I monitor the internal temperature of my pork butts throughout the smoking process and have never observed a drop in temperature...that maddening stall, yes. But never a drop. Interesting article on the stall phenomenon and what causes it at http://www.amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/the_stall.html


I believe the author in your link noted that he has observed a temperature drop as well.



IIRC, even McGee notes that the temperature will stall, but not drop.



If some has a page number from "On Food and Cooking" where McGee says the temperature will stall but never drop I'd appreciate it if you could post that information. I just took a quick peek and don't see that but if he wrote it I'd like to see the context. In either event I get a temperature drop after hitting the plateau.
Now understand I'm just trying to illustrate why a noob should get a Polder thermometer and help get some one started out. I didn't expect any one to get so literal as to think I would have a precise 15 degree drop on each cook. The main point here being to have a record of time/temp where your stall or drop took place in the cooking process Vs popping open the lid every 15 minutes for X hours.... or worse yet just missing it altogether. There is certainly a group that likes to cook fast and while I see nothing wrong with that I see no gain either. I'm sure we can can all do 12 hour cooks on just about any grill by cooking hotter. The whole idea is to cook low and slow to extend the conversion process. Not to make it go faster....at least that's my take but as they say YMMV and it couldn't possibly be more true with some thing as subjective as BBQ.

Deckhand
03-13-2012, 04:04 PM
I believe the author in your link noted that he has observed a temperature drop as well.






If some has a page number from "On Food and Cooking" where McGee says the temperature will stall but never drop I'd appreciate it if you could post that information. I just took a quick peek and don't see that but if he wrote it I'd like to see the context. In either event I get a temperature drop after hitting the plateau.
Now understand I'm just trying to illustrate why a noob should get a Polder thermometer and help get some one started out. I didn't expect any one to get so literal as to think I would have a precise 15 degree drop on each cook. The main point here being to have a record of time/temp where your stall or drop took place in the cooking process Vs popping open the lid every 15 minutes for X hours.... or worse yet just missing it altogether. There is certainly a group that likes to cook fast and while I see nothing wrong with that I see no gain either. I'm sure we can can all do 12 hour cooks on just about any grill by cooking hotter. The whole idea is to cook low and slow to extend the conversion process. Not to make it go faster....at least that's my take but as they say YMMV and it couldn't possibly be more true with some thing as subjective as BBQ.

Pg.354 on my iBook version for the process. Didn't see anything about the stall, but it's a big book. Does say the cook is responsible for keeping temp appropriate.Looks like meat at 160F for the magic.

Lucretia
03-13-2012, 04:23 PM
Don't have a BGE, but I put my pork butt on the smoker at around 210-215 degrees for about 8 hours, then transfer it to a covered roasting pan in a 200 degree oven for another 24 hours plus or minus a couple of hours--it's pretty forgiving. After 8 hours or so you've got plenty of smoke flavor. Long cooking time makes it tender and suculent, and you don't have to worry about feeding the smoker overnight. RO charcoal and soaked hickory chunks during the smoking phase. A good rub applied 24 hours before cooking makes a big difference.

mhlee
03-13-2012, 05:08 PM
+1 to adding the dry rub in advance. I actually prefer putting a light amount of rub over 24 hours in advance - 48 hours if you can. The rub acts like a dry brine if it has salt.

Chifunda
03-13-2012, 05:20 PM
I like and recommend Chris Schlesinger's All-South Barbecue rub from The Thrill of the Grill. Best I've found for both butts and ribs.

Duckfat
03-13-2012, 05:43 PM
Pg.354 on my iBook version for the process. Didn't see anything about the stall, but it's a big book.

Not seeing any thing about the stall here either. Page 157 for BBQ and page 150 and 597-98 for Collagen. No mention of stall temp or temp not dropping off. One thing I should mention is I always do Berkshire butts so there is far more fat than what I see on typical grocery store butts.
I'm not a big fan of buying rubs but Dizzy Pig is good stuff. GFS has some very good rubs at a fair price for those who don't blend their own.

Dave

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-13-2012, 07:03 PM
Who needs a book, the information is all here!

hax9215
03-14-2012, 01:19 AM
Mr. Duckfat

I do not have any experience with an egg, but have noticed the "drop off" depending on where I pack the meat in the smoker. I believe that if you place the meat in an area with significant airflo you get a convection effect that causes an initial pronounced spike, especially in the initial bringing up to temp. I wonder if the thermodynamics of the egg does not have a similar effect? btw, I am one of those that does not like to flash to 195 at the end-I think the high heat breaks down the collagen homeostasis you just spent 10+ hours developing. 165-170 and I will deliver to the judges. I kept my mouth shut regarding a '2-4 hour smoke' vis-a'-vis the collagen-gelatin issue not wanting to offend anyone. I also don't usually pass 12-14 hours unless I am doing a whole pig, and frankly will only do a whole one if requested, much easier to manage if split. The biggest concern i have with the egg is internal humidity affecting juiciness, but everyone tells me it is a non-issue.

Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!! :D

SpikeC
03-14-2012, 02:10 PM
Yes, the egg holds moisture very well. You have to really work to dry something out.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-21-2012, 11:06 AM
Changed my first slow cook plan from pulled pork to brisket. Any good rubs out there you suggest (home made)?

PS Thanks Matt for sending me some of your home made rubs, can't wait to try them!

Jason

El Pescador
03-21-2012, 11:22 AM
Brisket is a lot tougher to get right than a pork shoulder...I mean A LOT tougher! I like a brisket without a rub, just sea salt and fresh cracked pepper a day before. I've stopped messing around with the briskets I was buying from Rest. Depot and now when I smoke brisket I buy it from my local butcher, for some reason the briskets aren't so hit and miss.

-Pesky

mhlee
03-21-2012, 11:59 AM
Changed my first slow cook plan from pulled pork to brisket. Any good rubs out there you suggest (home made)?

PS Thanks Matt for sending me some of your home made rubs, can't wait to try them!

Jason

Jason:

If I may, I would also recommend trying different woods. In my opinion, rubs are more important for smaller pieces of meat where you have a greater ratio of surface to meat, than large pieces of meat such as pork butts. However, for nearly all things you smoke or bbq, the wood will also provide a distinct flavor. What you're looking for flavor wise may simply be a matter of using a different wood.

For a somewhat neutral yet pure smoke flavor, I personally use oak (I almost esclusively use oak for beef). For a more traditional barbecue flavor, I use some hickory. However, for chicken and pork, I absolutely love peach wood. It's hard to come by depending on where you live, but it imparts a wonderful sweet, smoky, complex flavor.

Kyle
03-21-2012, 12:54 PM
Brisket is a lot tougher to get right than a pork shoulder...I mean A LOT tougher! I like a brisket without a rub, just sea salt and fresh cracked pepper a day before. I've stopped messing around with the briskets I was buying from Rest. Depot and now when I smoke brisket I buy it from my local butcher, for some reason the briskets aren't so hit and miss.

-Pesky

Agreed. Pulled pork is MUCH more forgiving, brisket can be frustrating on your first couple cooks. But I'm not discouraging you from doing a brisket, so please go ahead if that's what you want to do. I also agree with Pesky in that I only season my briskets with salt and pepper. To me it's all about the simplicity of the meat and the smoke flavor, so I don't like to mess with it too much these days. I do trim the fat cap closer to the meat because I don't believe that smoke penetrates the fat, plus most of it does not render so you end up with a mushy fatty exterior that you slice off before serving so there goes your seasonings. The internal fat content of the brisket will keep it moist.

Good luck!

DeepCSweede
03-21-2012, 01:26 PM
Jason:

If I may, I would also recommend trying different woods. In my opinion, rubs are more important for smaller pieces of meat where you have a greater ratio of surface to meat, than large pieces of meat such as pork butts. However, for nearly all things you smoke or bbq, the wood will also provide a distinct flavor. What you're looking for flavor wise may simply be a matter of using a different wood.

For a somewhat neutral yet pure smoke flavor, I personally use oak (I almost esclusively use oak for beef). For a more traditional barbecue flavor, I use some hickory. However, for chicken and pork, I absolutely love peach wood. It's hard to come by depending on where you live, but it imparts a wonderful sweet, smoky, complex flavor.

For meats where I want to add a little sweetness, I like to add some applewood or pear wood to whatever wood I am using (oak or hickory). I generally use it with pork and sometimes chicken. It all depends on how much trimming my dad does on his trees though.

El Pescador
03-21-2012, 01:31 PM
For meats where I want to add a little sweetness, I like to add some applewood or pear wood to whatever wood I am using (oak or hickory). I generally use it with pork and sometimes chicken. It all depends on how much trimming my dad does on his trees though.

I'm all about fruitwood for pork, bird or "delicate" meats like salmon but with beef its it's a mix of Hickory and White Oak over Mesquite.

Duckfat
03-21-2012, 04:06 PM
I find brisket to be far less forgiving as well. I had a heckuva time finding packers last year but I have one ready to roll. I sure with I would have known it was going to be 85 today!
I use hickory for brisket. Any one use Pecan? I don't trim all the fat off the cap and I cook fat side down.

Dave

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-21-2012, 05:16 PM
FYSA I have been smoking meat for years, just my first time on the egg. I've also had mixed luck on brisket, it's been amazing at times and used for stew meat at others. What I am really looking forward to is the consistant low temperatures needed for great brisket. It was hard to do that in my thinner layered smokers of the past. Temp kept going up and down too much and the ambient temperature is important of course...Jason

El Pescador
03-21-2012, 05:18 PM
FYSA I have been smoking meat for years, just my first time on the egg. I've also had mixed luck on brisket, it's been amazing at times and used for stew meat at others. What I am really looking forward to is the consistant low temperatures needed for great brisket. It was hard to do that in my thinner layered smokers of the past. Temp kept going up and down too much and the ambient temperature is important of course...Jason

I'm actually buying Prime brisket from my butcher and that really has made all the difference. I too trim away most of the fat cap, because I have found that is enough inter-muscular fat with the Primes.

mhlee
03-21-2012, 05:24 PM
I find brisket to be far less forgiving as well. I had a heckuva time finding packers last year but I have one ready to roll. I sure with I would have known it was going to be 85 today!
I use hickory for brisket. Any one use Pecan? I don't trim all the fat off the cap and I cook fat side down.

Dave

If I recall correctly from All Star Barbecue Showdown, Dr. BBQ uses some Pecan when smoking brisket.

FYI - Many publications are projecting higher beef prices this year because of the drought in Texas this past summer. A lot of cattle were slaughtered due to the lack of feed and water, resulting in smaller herds this year and higher prices.

Andrew H
03-21-2012, 05:28 PM
I'm actually buying Prime brisket from my butcher and that really has made all the difference. I too trim away most of the fat cap, because I have found that is enough inter-muscular fat with the Primes.

How much does prime brisket cost you a lb?

El Pescador
03-21-2012, 06:12 PM
4.49/lb for prime.

Duckfat
03-21-2012, 06:48 PM
$4.49 for prime seems like a very good price. Run of the mill choice packers are pushing $3 here. The only on line source I found in the past for prime briskets was American Kobe.
IIR that was a good bit more than $4.49.

Dave

El Pescador
03-21-2012, 07:00 PM
There's no market for "prime" brisket so he puts it out with all the others. when I call or see him he pulls out the prime for me.

Kyle
03-22-2012, 01:47 PM
There's no market for "prime" brisket so he puts it out with all the others. when I call or see him he pulls out the prime for me.

Lucky!

El Pescador
03-22-2012, 02:15 PM
Lucky!
TipTop Meats in Carlsbad.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-22-2012, 05:08 PM
Wanted your opinion...if I let this go overnight, is the temp consistant enough to handle not attending for 6-7 hours? I figured I would load it with charcoal, keep it low and slow, and wake up early (6am is early for AF haha). I'm not going to be around Saturday, so need to get this going tonight.

mhlee
03-22-2012, 05:41 PM
Yes. Just make sure the bottom vent is barely open if you're going to keep it sub 250 degrees and load it up with a full load of charcoal.

Bulldogbacchus
03-22-2012, 06:34 PM
Yes. Just make sure the bottom vent is barely open if you're going to keep it sub 250 degrees and load it up with a full load of charcoal.

And when he says barely open, he really means it, like a quarter inch or less. and the vent barely open at the top. I put one 4 inch diameter oak piece and a similiar size hickory, and then fill it with charcoal.
I have a BBQ guru, but dont even use it for a 12 hour smoke....

Duckfat
03-23-2012, 12:57 PM
Wanted your opinion...if I let this go overnight, is the temp consistant enough to handle not attending for 6-7 hours?

Yes but adding to what others said in combination with this being the first slow burn I'd say start early enough so you can attend the BGE for the first two hours as the temp stabilizes and you get your vent and daisy wheel openings tweaked. I've got a brisqet drying in the fridge for Sunday. It's been like July here for days now.

Dave

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-23-2012, 03:25 PM
Dave,

When you mention drying, do you put it on a perforated cooling rack, then on a sheet pan? Do you find this helps considering a brisket is already a dry peice of meat and needs the extra moisture? How do you combat this?

Jason

Duckfat
03-23-2012, 04:12 PM
Jason,
Due to the physical size of a packer brisket I can't use any thing but a flat pan in my fridge. I made the mistake of paying a boat load extra for a countertop depth fridge. Nothing like paying more...for less.
In either event after I take the brisket from the cryo I just set it in the fridge uncovered for a day to help dry out some of the blood. Then I season it and put it back in the fridge for one more day. I don't find that this has any impact on the moisture of my brisket. I think you will find the BGE ceramic helps hold moisture very well. You can start with a pan on top of your plate setter with liquid if you wish. I use old pie pans for this and do it mostly so once the fluid evaporates the pan catches the majority of the fat. I just toss the pan after the cook. This makes clean up a bit easier.
If I had a larger fridge I would hold the brisket in the cryo for two weeks in advance to allow it to wet age as well but I just don't have the room.

Dave

El Pescador
03-23-2012, 05:27 PM
Jason,
Due to the physical size of a packer brisket I can't use any thing but a flat pan in my fridge. I made the mistake of paying a boat load extra for a countertop depth fridge. Nothing like paying more...for less.
In either event after I take the brisket from the cryo I just set it in the fridge uncovered for a day to help dry out some of the blood. Then I season it and put it back in the fridge for one more day. I don't find that this has any impact on the moisture of my brisket. I think you will find the BGE ceramic helps hold moisture very well. You can start with a pan on top of your plate setter with liquid if you wish. I use old pie pans for this and do it mostly so once the fluid evaporates the pan catches the majority of the fat. I just toss the pan after the cook. This makes clean up a bit easier.
If I had a larger fridge I would hold the brisket in the cryo for two weeks in advance to allow it to wet age as well but I just don't have the room.

Dave
The "dry aging" also helps in tenderizing.

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-24-2012, 02:10 AM
So I am 4 hours into the brisket. Before I started I let it stabilize for 2 hours, as I was getting set up (with my plate setter), the temp shot up. After I closed the lid and shut the vents, I heard a whine and then pop. Next thing I know the felt seal came off. Must have not given the felt seal enough time to set. Either way, it's holding temp well 4 hours in, and I am about to go to bed and wake up in 4-5 hours to check on it. BTW, the juices are holding quite well, can't believe how great it does at this!

Jason

Kyle
03-24-2012, 03:09 AM
The temp should not go above 350* for the first few hours of your first cook to allow the gasket to really seal. Mine has been burned out for a while now and it still holds temps like a champ. I have a Rutland gasket to replace it but I haven't gotten around to it yet.

Duckfat
03-24-2012, 11:42 AM
Irrespective of your burn in procedure the gasket should not have come off. Call BGE and ask them for a replacement! They should send one free of charge. I received a hi-temp (nomex?) gasket from them under warranty. Once your done with your burn if you can re-use this gasket clean the surface of the ceramic where it came off with acetone and then use 777 spray glue (3M brand home depot carries it) to apply the gasket. Total bummer that your having this problem in combination with the flying daisy wheel. Some lump can really snap crackle and pop so I hope it was just the charcoal.

Dave

AFKitchenknivesguy
03-24-2012, 10:07 PM
It'll be a pain in the butt, but I plan on resealing it tomorrow, and fixing the daisy wheel as well. The brisket turned out great, though a bit dryer than I wanted it to. I seasoned it with just salt and pepper, and smoked it using mesquite/apple. Stayed between 225-250 the whole 12 hours. Didn't have a pretty pink ring, but it had great smoke flavor and not the overwhelming kind. When I sliced it, it held together but pulled apart easily with my fingers. Tastes better than Rudy's down the road, and they charge a lot per lb.

El Pescador
03-24-2012, 11:52 PM
Just pulled off some teriyaki chicken. My friend thought it was the best ckicken he's ever had. Thanks little green buddy!

Duckfat
04-03-2012, 12:06 PM
I wound up doing the first brisket of the season last week. My internal meat temp rose to 151 over the first three hours and then leveled off for a few hours before climbing to 172 where I hit the plateau. After holding there for some time my internal temp dropped off five degrees for two hours. That's when I managed to fall asleep. (grooooan) Pulled at 195 and just a hair over 12 hours. Probably about an hour too long for where I would have liked to have been (185). Still came out good for the first burn of the season.
I'm going to do some cedar planked Salmon this week.

Dave

AFKitchenknivesguy
04-03-2012, 12:42 PM
I smoked a pork shoulder last weekend. At about 9 hours in, the temp dropped from 230F to 150F, apparently because the coals went out (almost). I think it's the hardwood coal I was using at first, cheaper with smaller pieces to block the airholes in the firepit. I bought some larger, better quality hardwood coal so I think that will fix the problem. I ended up keeping it on for 22 hours, but couldn't get the temp above 180F. Any ideas? I wanted to get it up to 200F without bumping the temp. BTW, I have to get a high heat gasket, this one burned off again, same as before. Granted, I had that baby up to 750F+ burning off drippings...

Duckfat
04-03-2012, 01:33 PM
Jason, it looks like the biggest issue you are having is with controlling your burn. I'd suggest getting a plastic tub like I mentioned up thread so you can sort your lump before you load the BGE. If you burn Royal Oak from Wally World it can have smaller pieces than the BGE branded RO the dealers sell so sometimes I have to open two bags. Open the bags and dump them in your sorting tub out side and down wind! You might be surprised at some of the things you find in a bag of lump. Make sure that your Fire box is centered in your unit and not pushing up against one side. The same with your fire ring. Make sure the opening on your Fire Box is centered with the lower vent opening on the BGE. You want good air flow all the way around the inside of your Egg. I wouldn't hesitate to call the company or email them and ask for a replacement Nomex gasket. That just shouldn't happen with your gasket that soon. I think you'll find them easy to deal with!
I noticed earlier that you said you had started your burn before putting your plate setter in. What I do is load the unit with fresh lump for any long/slow burn. I buy Rutland safe lite fire starter squares on close out every spring at Tractor Supply Co (fireplace acc) for fire starters. So I just break one up in thirds and place it in the charcoal in between the cut outs on the side of the plate setter so I can lite them with out removing the plate setter. From the time I lite them, add a disposable pie pan on top of the plate setter and place the grate it's probably less than 20 minutes before I'm at a steady temp and ready to start cooking. I may have to do a fine tweak on the vent/Daisy wheel a few times in the first few hours but after that I rarely make any vent adjustments unless I open the Egg.

Dave

AFKitchenknivesguy
04-03-2012, 04:51 PM
When do you put the wood chunks/chips in?

Duckfat
04-03-2012, 05:25 PM
I use chunk wood for brisket/pork and I mix that in with the lump when I load the egg. I make sure I have some wood at every level so I'm getting smoke all through the cooking process.

Dave

mhlee
04-03-2012, 05:28 PM
You can disperse the wood chunks throughout the charcoal before lighting so chunks will burn as the fire spreads. I actually prefer lighting wood chunks with my charcoal when I start. That way, I get a solid smoke ring right from the start.

Here are a couple of tricks I use for longer burns. First, I use my wet dry vac to clean out ashes after any long burn. That way, I have a consistent cook and cooker - no unburnt pieces from the previous cook to catch fire, no airways are blocked, no mid-cook issues with too much ash. Second, there's no need to go up to 750 to burn off drippings. I had my XL BGE up to 450 two weekends ago to burn off mold and other stuff from not using it during the winter. About 2 hours at 450 did the trick. Third, like Dave recommended, use larger chunks of charcoal for long cooks. The cooking temp will be lower than using smaller chunks of charcoal (there's less surface area to catch fire, especially when lighting the BGE like Dave recommended in a number of areas, and at a low temp, the larger pieces will take that much longer to light up completely). Fourth, gradually get up to temp; don't go too high and bring it down. You'll use more fuel the higher you want to go - if you start low, and keep the fire going slowly along, you won't use much fuel. There's really no reason why you can't do an all night cook with a full firebox if you start with a low temp, around 200, and keep it there.

Lastly, if you have any concern about not having enough fuel to get through a cook, take whatever you're cooking out of the fridge early. It's amazing how long the center of a pork butt will stay cold after you pull it out of the fridge.

AFKitchenknivesguy
04-03-2012, 06:00 PM
All great info, thanks!

Duckfat
04-03-2012, 07:26 PM
Jason you know were gonna show up for beer and ribs right! :hungry:

Dave

AFKitchenknivesguy
04-03-2012, 11:49 PM
BTW, I bought a BBQ Guru PartQ. With your recommendations, in addition to this, I hope I get better.

Not to say what I've made so far hasn't been good...

Deckhand
04-23-2012, 12:57 PM
Anyone know a reputable dealer in southern California anywhere from San Diego to Los Angeles. The reviews I am reading on businesses by me in Costa Mesa have very poor customer service. I know I can get a deal at an egg fest, but more concerned with buying from someone who will give good customer service after the investment. Any opinions. Thanks in advance.

lowercasebill
04-23-2012, 01:12 PM
you question is better asked here http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&Itemid=112&func=showcat&view=classic&catid=1&showdays=2
i live on the east coast but this place has a good reputation http://eggsbythebay.com/

Deckhand
04-23-2012, 01:38 PM
That place looks eggsceptional. Thought some of the southern cal guys might respond. I will keep that place in mind. I drove farther than that to buy my dog. : ) thanks for your response.

mikemac
04-23-2012, 01:59 PM
Deckhand:

I started my ceramic jouney probably 15 years ago with a Kamado, and unfortunately some of the issues that bothered me then about So Cal retailers haven't changed, so my advice would be find the lowest price closest to you. Not sure what you're looking for in customer service, but what you're buying is a massive hunk of concrete...more or less. The best 'customer service' you'll get on these will come from the community on the BGE forum. Try to find a 'no sales tax' or Memorial day sale, and talk them into free delivery & set up - you'll come out ahead. Really, most retailers want to sell you a gas fired stainless something or other and think your ribs should be boiled first.

mhlee
04-23-2012, 02:11 PM
I purchased a once used XL BGE at the Southern California Eggfest last year. It's worked for me great so far.

The company that sponsors it is here: http://outdoorkitchencreations.net/

Unfortunately, they already sold out of the once used eggs for this year's Eggfest. However, these people are really great. Great service, answer all questions, etc. If you go to the Eggfest, they'll probably have a regional representative there to answer any more questions.

However, as I've explained before, I don't think the BGE platesetter is great in my experience. Maybe it's how I"m using it, but I don't feel that I get enough circulation or smoke when I use it. I'm seriously considering buying the indirect setup from this company: http://www.ceramicgrillstore.com/

Feel free to message me if you have any questions.

Deckhand
04-23-2012, 02:49 PM
I purchased a once used XL BGE at the Southern California Eggfest last year. It's worked for me great so far.

The company that sponsors it is here: http://outdoorkitchencreations.net/

Unfortunately, they already sold out of the once used eggs for this year's Eggfest. However, these people are really great. Great service, answer all questions, etc. If you go to the Eggfest, they'll probably have a regional representative there to answer any more questions.

However, as I've explained before, I don't think the BGE platesetter is great in my experience. Maybe it's how I"m using it, but I don't feel that I get enough circulation or smoke when I use it. I'm seriously considering buying the indirect setup from this company: http://www.ceramicgrillstore.com/

Feel free to message me if you have any questions.

Excellent! Exactly, what I needed. A BBQ store where they didn't behave like total #%&$! It's a personal thing, restaurant, gas station, any business if service and general consideration is poor don't like to spend my money there. Support the good guys. Read a bunch of reviews on places. Where people spent thousands and were treated like dirt. This place looks great! Thanks for the plate setter tips.

AFKitchenknivesguy
04-23-2012, 02:57 PM
I purchased a once used XL BGE at the Southern California Eggfest last year. It's worked for me great so far.

The company that sponsors it is here: http://outdoorkitchencreations.net/

Unfortunately, they already sold out of the once used eggs for this year's Eggfest. However, these people are really great. Great service, answer all questions, etc. If you go to the Eggfest, they'll probably have a regional representative there to answer any more questions.

However, as I've explained before, I don't think the BGE platesetter is great in my experience. Maybe it's how I"m using it, but I don't feel that I get enough circulation or smoke when I use it. I'm seriously considering buying the indirect setup from this company: http://www.ceramicgrillstore.com/

Feel free to message me if you have any questions.

:plus1: I am starting to feel the same way.

lowercasebill
04-23-2012, 05:57 PM
the place setter has its place especailly for pizza and bread but as far as everything else i think toms stuff from ceramicgrillstore is the way to go .. i have not done that as i have several pizza stones and something from bbqguru that allows me to use the pizza stone for indirect and several grids with carriage bolts for multi level cooking. if i could stop spending money on knives i would get the stuff from tom.. who , by the was is a great guy and his products are first class.
.
am i allowed to post a link for a friends website who sell bbq rubs that are very popular with the bge and bbq crowd? i have no financial interest. thanks for your advice .

Duckfat
04-27-2012, 08:59 PM
Any one else notice that Wally World has downsized their bags of Royal Oak? I didn't realise until I got home I had one ten pound bag and one that weighs 8.8#. :curse:

Dave

Deckhand
04-27-2012, 09:37 PM
Any one else notice that Wally World has downsized their bags of Royal Oak? I didn't realise until I got home I had one ten pound bag and one that weighs 8.8#. :curse:

Dave

Maybe that was just a quality control thing. Fingers crossed. Walmart is still way cheaper than BBQ stores around here. Would be nice to find a bulk supplier around me.

Duckfat
04-28-2012, 07:27 AM
The bags look like their the same size but the print has changed. Still made in the USA but 8.8#. I'm going to hit a few WW's this morning to try and stock up for the season with 10# bags.

Dave

UCChemE05
09-29-2013, 08:50 PM
I posted this in the "Baking Steel for Pizza" thread.. thought some of you with kamado grills might be interested.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/250320055/great-wok-kamado-grill-conversion-kit

mast3quila
10-01-2013, 02:42 PM
mmmm...zombie threads....
I love my BGEs.

Crothcipt
10-08-2013, 02:00 AM
:zombiegrave: