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David Metzger
03-14-2012, 12:17 AM
Carter has made the Funayuki popular and the design difference seems rather minor compared to Gyuto. It seems to have a less upswept tip, maybe the length is typically shorter. I haven't been able to find any reliable info on the differences. Please enlighten me and let me know if you like one design better than the other.

David

Eamon Burke
03-14-2012, 12:22 AM
IIRC, a Funayuki is basically a Gyuto in profile but it's a traditional single bevel.

Murray just calls his knives whatever he wants, which is his right.

tk59
03-14-2012, 12:24 AM
Murray told me that a gyuto is the same as a funayuki only longer but he does not really have a strict length for the split.

JBroida
03-14-2012, 02:19 AM
funayuki is traditionally a type of deba that is a bit thinner and generaly smaller... often used for things like saba and aji. From sakai, they tend to be single bevel. From tosa and similar regions, they tend to be double bevel.

MadMel
03-14-2012, 05:12 AM
Learned something new today!!

andoniminev
03-14-2012, 05:29 AM
Learned something new today!!
That is why I love this forum

eshua
03-14-2012, 05:49 AM
Maybe this will become a question that is different for etymology and popular consumerism, I think Jon is the expert, but soon we may see funayuki as slang for profile style, and less as traditional usage.

JBroida
03-14-2012, 12:29 PM
thats kind of the way murray goes about it i think. However, his funayuki is a bit less tall than what we normally see. But it does explain why he normally does them in smaller sizes.

Deckhand
03-14-2012, 01:22 PM
Maybe this will become a question that is different for etymology and popular consumerism, I think Jon is the expert, but soon we may see funayuki as slang for profile style, and less as traditional usage.


Funayuki to me is an all use boat knife. Of course I love the idea. I used the term for profile style. I see a lot of gyutos with a different profile not just length. I ordered a custom from Rodrigue and specifically said I wanted a funayuki profile. Probably using the terms wrong but hopefully conveying my views.

oivind_dahle
03-14-2012, 02:23 PM
You got it all wrong

As japanese knives wanted to enter the western marked, they knew the common man had no fun in the kitchen. The name Guyto was not an optimal name, as it means "Cow Sword", nor would they have a hit with santuko as the japanese themselves don't know what this knife is used for.

Finally they decided to market a chef knife and called it funaykui, this due to poor english. They knew the english word fun and wanted it to be "fun at your kitchen". But their lack of language skills made it just to fun - a - your - kitchen = Fun - a -y-kui

Deckhand
03-14-2012, 02:28 PM
You got it all wrong

As japanese knives wanted to enter the western marked, they knew the common man had no fun in the kitchen. The name Guyto was not an optimal name, as it means "Cow Sword", nor would they have a hit with santuko as the japanese themselves don't know what this knife is used for.


Finally they decided to market a chef knife and called it funaykui, this due to poor english. They knew the english word fun and wanted it to be "fun at your kitchen". But their lack of language skills made it just to fun - a - your - kitchen = Fun - a -y-kui
:rofl2: that's great!

JBroida
03-14-2012, 02:32 PM
You got it all wrong

As japanese knives wanted to enter the western marked, they knew the common man had no fun in the kitchen. The name Guyto was not an optimal name, as it means "Cow Sword", nor would they have a hit with santuko as the japanese themselves don't know what this knife is used for.

Finally they decided to market a chef knife and called it funaykui, this due to poor english. They knew the english word fun and wanted it to be "fun at your kitchen". But their lack of language skills made it just to fun - a - your - kitchen = Fun - a -y-kui

haha

Duckfat
03-14-2012, 03:25 PM
Funayuki to me is an all use boat knife.

IIR This is way that Suisin Dreamworks used to describe the Funayuki. Their profile seems a bit more similar to a Deba than a Gyuto and taller than other brands.

JBroida
03-14-2012, 03:41 PM
suisin tends to have funayuki in the traditional deba sense... single bevel, thin, etc.

Deckhand
03-14-2012, 03:44 PM
IIR This is way that Suisin Dreamworks used to describe the Funayuki. Their profile seems a bit more similar to a Deba than a Gyuto and taller than other brands.

The Suisin Dreamcraft funayuki is on my list of want to buy. They look good.

BobCat
03-14-2012, 04:16 PM
I like this one I got from Jon.

5330

geezr
03-14-2012, 04:19 PM
The Suisin Dreamcraft funayuki is on my list of want to buy. They look good.
:plus1: friend has one - really nice :knife: