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sw2geeks
03-20-2012, 05:16 PM
Made some corned beef hash out of my leftover corned beef and cabbage from St. Patrick’s Day.

Chopping up corned beef for hash calls for a cleaver which is always fun!
Here are some pics.

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/48/4Hc1k.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/56/v0rRd.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/54/GdV5Z.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/54/BrFPx.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/52/HLACt.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/49/17CXS1.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/49/ckkHv.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/47/14cdKV.St.117.jpg

http://media.dfw.com/smedia/2012/03/20/11/44/snnWj.St.117.jpg

Corned beef hash is on of those rare dishes were the leftovers taste better than the original meal.

More pics and recipe here (http://www.dfw.com/2012/03/20/595242/corned-beef-hash.html).

slowtyper
03-20-2012, 05:37 PM
You gotta be kidding me....that is just amazing

Pensacola Tiger
03-20-2012, 06:00 PM
What, no carrots?

One of my favorite things to do with St. Patrick's Day leftovers. Thanks for posting.

Rick

Jim
03-20-2012, 09:04 PM
A thing of joy to behold!

mhenry
03-20-2012, 09:17 PM
Amazing! One of my favorite things

99Limited
03-20-2012, 10:01 PM
I'm doing this in the morning.

ajhuff
03-20-2012, 10:31 PM
I love love love hash. Mine is very simple. Meat, potatoes, onion, nearly 1:1:1, salt and pepper. I will make it out of ANY meat, roast beef, corner beef, summer sausage, hot dogs, you name it. My favorite is smoked turkey. If I ever had my own restaurant hash would be on the menu every day as a daily special using up the previous day's meat. :-)

-AJ

Chifunda
03-21-2012, 12:14 AM
Made the same thing for dinner tonight along with rye toast leftover from the Reuben sandwiches we had yesterday.

Must confess to having used an egg poacher...haven't yet gotten the swirly thing in the water down yet. :O

:goodpost:

stereo.pete
03-21-2012, 12:17 AM
I want this right now!!!

wenus2
03-21-2012, 02:52 AM
Nailed that egg! What is that, ostrich?

sw2geeks
03-21-2012, 10:13 AM
Nailed that egg! What is that, ostrich?
I search through the eggs at the store looking for the packages with the latest expiration dates. I wanted the freshes eggs I could find sinse I was poaching them. Turned out the extra large eggs were the freshes, the yokes in them were huge.

sw2geeks
03-21-2012, 10:19 AM
Must confess to having used an egg poacher...haven't yet gotten the swirly thing in the water down yet. :O

:goodpost:

No swirling here, just adding some vinegar to the water works for me.

Lucretia
03-21-2012, 10:21 AM
That looks good enough to make me want to try corned beef again--it's only been 40 years since I last had it...

Chifunda
03-21-2012, 12:37 PM
No swirling here, just adding some vinegar to the water works for me.

Thanks. I'll give it a try without the whirlpool routine. Product from the egg poacher turn out fine as to degree of doneness, flavor, etc. But they look a little too...industrial. Yours are much more pleasing to the eye.

Ya, those are some bloody big eggs. Did they come from that poultry farm out by the nuclear test site? :scared1:

sw2geeks
03-21-2012, 01:19 PM
Thanks. I'll give it a try without the whirlpool routine. Product from the egg poacher turn out fine as to degree of doneness, flavor, etc. But they look a little too...industrial. Yours are much more pleasing to the eye.

I use a non-stick pan and fill it with about an 1 1/2" of water, then bring the water to the verge of boiling and reduce heat. Add a tablespoon of vinegar for each cup of water in the pan and stir. Carefully crack open egg/eggs making sure not breaking the yokes and put each into a small cup. Get cup as close as you can to the water and gently pour in. If the whites start to spread out use a slotted spoon to push them back towards the yoke. They should be ready it 2 to 4 minutes, depending on how runny you like your yoke. I like mine a little firm so I went with 4 minutes. Remove with slotted spoon. If you are not serving them right away you can dip them in ice water to stop the cooking.

Chifunda
03-21-2012, 02:03 PM
I use a non-stick pan and fill it with about an 1 1/2" of water, then bring the water to the verge of boiling and reduce heat. Add a tablespoon of vinegar for each cup of water in the pan and stir. Carefully crack open egg/eggs making sure not breaking the yokes and put each into a small cup. Get cup as close as you can to the water and gently pour in. If the whites start to spread out use a slotted spoon to push them back towards the yoke. They should be ready it 2 to 4 minutes, depending on how runny you like your yoke. I like mine a little firm so I went with 4 minutes. Remove with slotted spoon. If you are not serving them right away you can dip them in ice water to stop the cooking.

Thank you for posting your technique. Just bought eighteen eggs this morning! :cooking2:

Crothcipt
03-21-2012, 08:55 PM
I recently talked to a breakfast chef, that explained to me that if you put the egg out of the shell in a ladle when you put the egg in the water. (run on sentence I'm sure.) Using the ladle to hold the egg in the water and for quick retrieval works over 90% of the time.