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UglyJoe
03-28-2011, 01:50 PM
Hey guys,

I'm thinking about refinishing my Mizuno and need to remove the handle to do so, and I had a question about it. I've seen Marko's instructions for this, and also one of maxim's video followed pretty much the same method. What I'm not sure of is how to tell the knife has been epoxied or not inside the tang. Marko said when this is the case you can't remove the handle without destroying it, which is obviously not something I want to do. Is there a way to tell if the handle has just been burned in vs. using epoxy as well? Or if it's been burned in is there no epoxy used, etc.? Anyone ever rehandle a Mizuno that knows if any epoxy was used or not?

Thanks,
UJ

Rottman
03-28-2011, 01:51 PM
What kind of knife is it?

RRLOVER
03-28-2011, 02:17 PM
If you are banging on it more then 90 seconds and it has not moved, I would say it is epoxied.I just pulled a watanabe off with three taps on the board.

SpikeC
03-28-2011, 03:02 PM
Epoxy will soften if heated. According to System Three, their epoxy has a max service temp of 160 f., so a heat gun or heat lamp should soften it enough to remove the handle. It has a deflection modulus of 119 f., whatever that means!
If the handle comes off in pieces, well, that is another project, I guess!

UglyJoe
03-28-2011, 03:04 PM
What kind of knife is it?


270 Gyuto. Marko, when reinstalling the handle do you basically do something similar to maxim, kind of fill the tang hole up with bees wax and rub down the tang with it, then just tap it back on and let it set for a few hours?

EdipisReks
03-28-2011, 03:32 PM
my mizuno's handle wasn't epoxied, it was attached traditionally, but it was so tight that it has to be cut off.

UglyJoe
03-28-2011, 04:06 PM
Sigh.... not what I wanted to hear. Well, I'll give it a shot, and if it don't work, I'll think of something else.

Marko Tsourkan
03-28-2011, 10:40 PM
Generally, Japanese makers seldom epoxy handles in. I have not come across a fully epoxied handle yet, even on Takeda, which has epoxy at the handle tip, but the tang hole is burned out.

To remove a handle, I use a wood mallet and a block of wood 4-6" longer than the blade (excluding handle). It takes me 4-5 strikes to remove a handle. I have done this countless times without a single failure. One day, I will get a camera and make a video of a process.

Joe - the trick is to place one end of the wood block against the handle and hit with a hammer hit the other end, while you holding a knife and a block in one hand and hammer in another. Put masking tape over the edge so you won't cut yourself and a rule of a thumb is to hold the blade with the edge away from your palm (I don't use masking tape). Hit hard and after 2-3 strikes you will start seeing movement in the handle.

M

heirkb
03-28-2011, 11:09 PM
Generally, Japanese makers seldom epoxy handles in. I have not come across a fully epoxied handle yet, even on Takeda, which has epoxy at the handle tip, but the tang hole is burned out.

To remove a handle, I use a wood mallet and a block of wood 4-6" longer than the blade (excluding handle). It takes me 4-5 strikes to remove a handle. I have done this countless times without a single failure. One day, I will get a camera and make a video of a process.

Joe - the trick is to place one end of the wood block against the handle and hit with a hammer hit the other end, while you holding a knife and a block in one hand and hammer in another. Put masking tape over the edge so you won't cut yourself and a rule of a thumb is to hold the blade with the edge away from your palm (I don't use masking tape). Hit hard and after 2-3 strikes you will start seeing movement in the handle.

M

I could be imagining this, but I'm almost certain that I saw some kind of video of this process recently. And it wasn't Maxim's video, I don't think...

Edit: Nope, not a video. It was Marko's thread with pics over at another forum. I don't think I should link there (or is that OK?), but here's a google link: http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=removing+wa+handles#sclient=psy&hl=en&source=hp&q=removing+wa+handles+pictures&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=4d5c28f4960f9d04
Should be the first hit on google.

Marko Tsourkan
03-28-2011, 11:17 PM
I could be imagining this, but I'm almost certain that I saw some kind of video of this process recently. And it wasn't Maxim's video, I don't think...

Edit: Nope, not a video. It was Marko's thread with pics over at another forum. I don't think I should link there (or is that OK?), but here's a google link: http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=removing+wa+handles#sclient=psy&hl=en&source=hp&q=removing+wa+handles+pictures&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=4d5c28f4960f9d04
Should be the first hit on google.

I think Maxim uses the same technique. I prefer to use a wooden mallet for a stronger impact, but could use a hammer or another piece of wood that has some weight.

Highly recommend to put a tape over the edge. If you don't pay attention and hold improperly and a knife slips, you will get a nasty cut.

M

apicius9
03-29-2011, 12:03 AM
I could be imagining this, but I'm almost certain that I saw some kind of video of this process recently. And it wasn't Maxim's video, I don't think...



Would you have a link to Maxim's video? I don't think I have seen that. Work really does get in the way of keeping up with the forums these days...

Thanks,

Stefan

Marko Tsourkan
03-29-2011, 12:14 AM
Would you have a link to Maxim's video? I don't think I have seen that. Work really does get in the way of keeping up with the forums these days...

Thanks,

Stefan

I am pretty sure it's in his Yoshi suji polishing video he posted recently.

M

olpappy
03-29-2011, 06:39 AM
Stefan, I have had to essentially destroy majority of the burned in Japanese handles, most of them were extremely tight, I think humidity expands the wood more than in a dry climate.

UglyJoe
03-29-2011, 10:47 AM
Stefan, I have had to essentially destroy majority of the burned in Japanese handles, most of them were extremely tight, I think humidity expands the wood more than in a dry climate.

I wonder if putting a knife in a freezer for a few hours might help this process? Would dry out the wood a little and should cause it to shrink back some...