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mpukas
04-26-2012, 09:24 PM
OK, guys, I'm gonna rant a little and fill you all in on one of my favorite things that I attribute my GooD FooD to - Celtic Sea Salt.
The brand I use is f/ Selina Naturally (http://www.selinanaturally.com/Celtic-Sea-Salt--C564.aspx). You can buy it most health food stores, Whole foods, etc. The website sells it cheapest, and in larger quantities, but they charge quite a bit for shipping. It can be found on Amazon w/ free shipping.

What do I like about it? Well, besides the supposed health benefits, it just plain tastes good! I've been using some sort of sea salt for, like forever, as I can't stand Kosher salt. I know, I know, everyone raves about Kosher salt and how flaky it is, and blah blah blah. Can't stand it - it tastes acrid and sour to me, and that taste is imparted to food. Celtic Sea Salt has a pure, clean, almost sweet flavor, and it enhances the flavor of food dramatically without added any salty tones or other weird flavors - provided you don't use too much.

One caveat - unless you spend the extra bucks for the fine ground stuff, it's really really coarse (and it's wet). Too coarse to be useful if I'm honest. So what then? I use a mortar and pestle and grind small batches to the size I want, and keep the ground salt in a covered sugar bowl nest to the pepper mill and olive oil bottles.

About the only thing I use Kosher salt for is boiling water for pasta or brines, as the CSS is too expensive for my blood to wash down the drain. For everything else, it's only CSS. Can be used to sprinkle on a protein destined for a grill or pan, used as a seasoning in a sauté, or as a finishing salt on fruit such as melons or strawberries w/ balsamic syrup. Hope you find this useful and try it out for yourselves! Cheers! mpp

Crothcipt
04-26-2012, 09:44 PM
Sea salt is always better (in my book) than most other salt. The flavor profile is changed by regions. I have not tried this one myself, but it sounds good.

One thing I wouldn't switch from Kosher to sea would be margaritas. I can't stand Tequila so its not a problem.

GlassEye
04-26-2012, 10:17 PM
I have been using Celtic Sea Salt a fair amount recently, good stuff. I also like to use Japanese sea salt, Himalayan pink and some others. A good sea salt can definitely elevate a dish.

Eamon Burke
04-26-2012, 10:19 PM
One thing I wouldn't switch from Kosher to sea would be margaritas. I can't stand Tequila so its not a problem.

Can't decide if that deserves a :scratchhead: or a :bat:.

apicius9
04-27-2012, 03:23 AM
I use alot of Hawaiian red salt :D They also have a coarse white which I get mostly because it's local, good for pasta water, sauces etc. - just a little coarser than the standard kosher salt. Just ran out of fleur de sel recently. In Europe I was using a lot of a greyish, wet French sea salt, from the Bretagne IIRC. Oh, there was also an English flaky salt that I liked but haven't seen in a while - Maldon? (sp?). I also wanted to eventually make a few seasoned/scented salts like truffle salt etc. Any other ideas for such scented salts? (not sure what else to call them).

Stefan

TB_London
04-27-2012, 04:38 AM
In Europe I was using a lot of a greyish, wet French sea salt, from the Bretagne IIRC. Oh, there was also an English flaky salt that I liked but haven't seen in a while - Maldon? (sp?).
Stefan

These are the 2 that I use for everything

Crothcipt
04-27-2012, 05:13 AM
Can't decide if that deserves a :scratchhead: or a :bat:.

Ok you asked, so here it goes. when I was about 25 I was seeing a stripper, that loved tequila. Long story short. 3 days of Tequila, and 3 days of being sick I still have a hard time even smelling it. Talk about having a hard time bar tending...

TB_London
04-27-2012, 06:40 AM
Haha everyone has a death drink, I still can't go near jd or pastis :puke:

oivind_dahle
04-27-2012, 09:59 AM
I go for Whiskey, and I like it the way I like my girls.
18 years old and mixed with coke :P

Deckhand
04-27-2012, 10:29 AM
I want to get some fleur de sel salt to make some domino potatoes.

DeepCSweede
04-27-2012, 11:06 AM
Long story short. 3 days of Tequila, and 3 days of being sick I still have a hard time even smelling it.

Does the smell of strippers and the sight of glitter give you the same reaction?:O

bprescot
04-27-2012, 01:06 PM
I've tried some varieties, though strangely not the celtic sea salt. We use a Camargue sea salt usually.

DeepCSweede
04-27-2012, 01:13 PM
I have been eyeing up some Himalayan Pink lately, possibly a block for a new cutting block j/k. Has anyone used one for serving / cooking?

rahimlee54
04-27-2012, 02:40 PM
Any tried to Portuguese flor da sal? I saw it at a spice shop last week and was intrigued.

Deckhand
04-27-2012, 02:44 PM
Any tried to Portuguese flor da sal? I saw it at a spice shop last week and was intrigued.
I think it is the portuguese name for fleur de sel
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleur_de_sel

Eamon Burke
04-28-2012, 02:42 AM
Fleur de Sel is great for finishing, but in my limited experience, if you are going to notice the subtle difference between it and any other high-quality sea salt, and difference between varieties is going to be a moot point, because the difference between BATCHES of the stuff is just as stark. Fleur De Sel from this one region this month is totally different from the month before. The good news is, it's all delicious. I just would be skeptical of someone swearing by one variety of Fleue De Sel over another, especially Portugal VS France.

Eamon Burke
04-28-2012, 02:43 AM
I have been eyeing up some Himalayan Pink lately, possibly a block for a new cutting block j/k. Has anyone used one for serving / cooking?

Got one for my wife for Christmas. The coolest thing is cutting a Grapefruit and just throwing the fruit on there and sliding it right off into a bowl. Seasons perfectly.

We used it for Sushi too. Don't leave a cucumber on it--it will grow a pit!

Haven't seared on it yet, partially because when you do, it turns it whitish brown and it's just so pretty right now.

Crothcipt
04-29-2012, 05:27 AM
:yuck::sofa::couch:
Does the smell of strippers and the sight of glitter give you the same reaction?:O
lol. It depends on the stripper.

mano
04-29-2012, 11:52 AM
Apparently, a valid study was done desolving different salts in some water and the result was no appreciable difference in taste.

I think there's a difference so for years we've used Sel Marin Gris, which some salt expert on the radio said was his every day salt. He talked about all sorts of esoteric salts to pair with particular foods. My eyes glazed over. We have some pink Hawaiian salt that went unused until I put it in a fancy salt box on the counter. Used it on fish and added a pinch to aged balsamic and unfiltered EVOO and it was terrific!

We get course salt and put it in our Unicorn salt grinder.

That celtic salt is $24/lb!? No way!

Bulldogbacchus
04-29-2012, 05:05 PM
I go for Whiskey, and I like it the way I like my girls.
18 years old and mixed with coke :P

+1

DwarvenChef
04-29-2012, 05:28 PM
Going to see if we have some at work, Always looking for upgrades to the pantry :)

I switched from Mortons Koser salt to Diamond KS. While I liked the consistance of mortons I just can't get past the metalic taste (to me) Diamond KS doesn't have that so far. But as far as a finishing salt I'm always on the lookout for something interesting. Tried a smoked seasalt and I still need to work on ideas for it, kind of on the fence. Also picked up a coarse seasalt from work that has a higher mineral content but tastes nothing like the mortons so I have been experimenting with it as a water/marinade salt.

Hope to find this on the shealf as I'm making my list to go shopping right now :)

brainsausage
04-29-2012, 05:50 PM
I go for Whiskey, and I like it the way I like my girls.
18 years old and mixed with coke :P

I like this:)

Mike9
07-24-2012, 07:32 PM
I just got some Celtic Sea Salt and some Himalayan pink in today. The difference in taste from Kosher is dramatic. I'll use Kosher for salting water for pasta, etc. but the Celtic for seasoning and pink for finishing will be a nice upgrade.

Keith Neal
07-24-2012, 08:24 PM
No one has mentioned Maldon. Some folks rave about it. I'm not sure it is that much better than Fleur de Sel, but it is nice.

Tristan
07-25-2012, 08:03 AM
Maldon beats fluer de sel??? I've been using Maldon off the shelf from the supermarket, but just recently splurged on a bucket (much cheaper this way) of fluer de sel to find out what all the fuss was about. I hope this doesn't spoil it for me.

Dusty
07-25-2012, 12:04 PM
There are different grades of flour de sel, the best stuff tastes like limestone and is far nicer than maldon, which I also like.

I use at home a Sicilian sea salt that is my go to for everything.

Last year I had some smoked Celtic sea salt that was frankly awesome.

clayton
07-25-2012, 02:43 PM
Which fleur de sel would you recommend?

I am a big Maldon fan, although since they changed the box the crystals seem to have changed a little shape wise too.

Anyway if better than Maldon I would really like to try some of the good fleur de sel.

Keith Neal
07-25-2012, 03:18 PM
Fleur de Sel De Guerande is what I have, and it is marvelous, but I don't have a lot to compare it with. You can get it on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Fleur-Sel-Guerande-Sea-Salt/dp/B003CHQEG2/ref=sr_1_12?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1343240315&sr=1-12&keywords=fleur+de+sel+de+guerande

mhlee
07-25-2012, 03:31 PM
Maldon and Fleur de Sel are two different animals, IMHO. Maldon is light and consists of larger, thin flakes than this fleur de sel:

http://www.amazon.com/Fleur-de-Sel-Camargue/dp/B0002FGY9O/ref=sr_1_2?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1343240705&sr=1-2&keywords=baleine+fleur+de+sel

This fleur de sel consists of crystals that are more squared off and noticeably crunchier and denser. I personally use Maldon because of its texture - the fine flakes of Maldon dissolve nicely and don't add a crunch that the fleur de sel can add.

To me, Maldon has a more delicate and pure flavor, where as the fleur de sel has a noticeable mineral flavor. Also, the clean, pure flavor of Maldon matches with a larger variety of foods, whereas the fleur de sel seems to match best with seafood.

SameGuy
07-26-2012, 01:01 PM
Fleur de Sel De Guerande is what I have, and it is marvelous, but I don't have a lot to compare it with. You can get it on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Fleur-Sel-Guerande-Sea-Salt/dp/B003CHQEG2/ref=sr_1_12?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1343240315&sr=1-12&keywords=fleur+de+sel+de+guerande

My everyday seasoning salt is La Baleine iodized sea salt from France (available in every supermarket here), while my heavy-duty (pasta water, etc.) is regular iodized small-crystal table salt (Sifto or Windsor/Morton brand). But my specialty salts of choice are Fleur de sel de Guérande and Flor de sal d'Es Trenc from Mallorca, Spain. That one is flavored with hibiscus and gives a unique twist to almost any fresh vegetable or fish plate.

SameGuy
07-26-2012, 01:17 PM
David Rocco's Dolce Vita had an episode about Sicily and featured Sicilian salt harvesting. While I don't like Rocco (he's too Spiccoli for me, always giggling and mugging for the camera), it's an interesting series and episode. They showed how to make flavored or scented salts (lemon), and used it on "Sicilian Sashimi."

rahimlee54
07-26-2012, 01:46 PM
Has anyone ever bought this stuff http://www.worldmarket.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11554712 they have a 2.5 lb bag for
$5 bucks which is a really good price. I saw it yesterday in my local store.

foreleft
07-29-2012, 07:47 PM
This is where I usually buy from:

http://www.saltworks.us/sea-salt.asp

You get a pretty good deal on 5 pound bags, Baleine $12.75, sel gris $21.20, and Fleur de sel $80.20 shipping is free.

I usually keep Diamond Crystal, Sel Gris, and Bali Pyramid (similar to Maldon) on hand at home. Was thinking about picking up a bag of Himalayan Pink or one of the black Hawaiian salts on my next order. They do a whole line of flavored salts too but I've never tried one.

ecchef
07-29-2012, 08:54 PM
Will be checking out this place this week:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izGYn7J99vY

Bulldogbacchus
07-29-2012, 09:55 PM
I go for Whiskey, and I like it the way I like my girls.
18 years old and mixed with coke :P

Oivind, you crack me up. If you ever come to Texas, I'm buying the drinks until we can't drink anymore

Sara@JKI
07-29-2012, 09:56 PM
I love natural salt from Japan... they have a rich flavor to it...

I also want to visit salt evaporation ponds along with Shio no Michi (塩の道)...

FYI: Shio no Michi was an old kaidō, commonly used roads, in ancient Japan and was used to transport salt from the ocean to the inland portions of central Honshū. In the Middle Ages, salt was brought both from oceans to Shinano Province for processing. The road leading from the Sea of Japan to Shinano Province was called the Chikuni Kaidō (千国街道), whereas the road leading from the Pacific Ocean was called the Sanshū Kaidō (三州街道)

The history of Shio no Michi is full of interesting stories and culturally very rich.

Is there similar places/roads in the US? I'm very curious about it.

SameGuy
07-29-2012, 11:07 PM
Thanks for the Saltworks link. They seem to have a better selection among the bulk sizes, but I don't mind; Himalayan makes for the best yeast-baking salt.

obtuse
07-30-2012, 07:39 AM
Japanese hand harvested salt is excellent. I was gifted a bag brought back from japan by a friend. Korean sea salt is another excellent everyday salt and very affordable.