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Moses the armenian
04-30-2012, 02:00 PM
Hello to all !
After buying several of the better cookbooks on roasting and cooking roast I am now in the market for some decent roasting pans . I am looking for middle to upper middle in the price range . That means no 500 dollar copper pans , but neither do I want a 10 dollar cheapo that's going to be toast after the first roast . I am open to all ideas and fwiw I have amazon prime so if you good. folks have any good deals there all the better , but I am open to any vendor the hive might recommend . Thanks for your help .
Moses

WildBoar
04-30-2012, 05:57 PM
Got an All-Clad stainless steel, a Sur La Table stainless steel, a Calphalon annonidized steel and a handful of cheap steel and aluminum ones. All get the job done in the oven. The cheap ones heat unevenly on the stovetop if you reduce in the roasting pan; the All-Clad, SLT and Calphalon all work just fine on the stovetop.

Frankly I would only get the All-Clad if on a decent sale.

Seth
04-30-2012, 06:02 PM
I use a 12 " allclad saute pan (straight sides). At the time these were cheaper than their roasting pans. This is nice for pan gravies but you enevitably grab that handle and 450 degrees can really hurt!

Moses the armenian
04-30-2012, 07:01 PM
How big a roast can you fit in that all clad 12 inch skillet ? seems like it might be for smaller roast ? Though I do like the idea I must say!!!!!

Pensacola Tiger
04-30-2012, 07:03 PM
I use a 12 " allclad saute pan (straight sides). At the time these were cheaper than their roasting pans. This is nice for pan gravies but you enevitably grab that handle and 450 degrees can really hurt!

But you only do that once.

TB_London
04-30-2012, 07:35 PM
Big lumps of cast iron and heavy guage anodised aluminium cover my needs

Moses the armenian
04-30-2012, 08:57 PM
Big lumps of cast iron and heavy guage anodised aluminium cover my needs

sir . sorry I am not sure I understand ? Are you using slabs of cast iron wrapped with foil ?

tk59
04-30-2012, 10:35 PM
But you only do that once.Actually, I've done it a few times... :dontknow:

mano
04-30-2012, 11:10 PM
SLT's own 3 ply 16x12 roasting pan is a great deal at $100:
http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-516385/Sur-La-Table-Tri-Ply-Stainless-Steel-Roasting-Pan

Buy the rack for another $13.

TB_London
05-01-2012, 08:21 AM
sir . sorry I am not sure I understand ? Are you using slabs of cast iron wrapped with foil ?

Sorry, no a mix of enamelled and seasoned cast iron baking trays-think le creuset. Big, heavy, safe for all heat sources, the enamelled ones double up for lasagna, moussaka, pies etc

Tristan
05-09-2012, 02:18 AM
Actually, I've done it a few times... :dontknow:

Don't sweat it. I do this on a weekly basis. In a few years... I'll be able to master some shaolin skill for holding hot iron... dam it hurts

brainsausage
05-10-2012, 12:47 AM
Actually, I've done it a few times... :dontknow:

Me too, especially making Spanish style tortillas in 12 inch French pans.

brainsausage
05-10-2012, 12:59 AM
In regards to roasting pans- As you dont want to actually submerge the product in fluid ( the fluid is typically water based and won't exceed 212 degrees which equals uneven cooking ), unless you're poaching or doing a confiture that is. True roasting involves a spit actually, and gives far more delicious results. When you bring a pan into it you're verging on baking/braising/steaming. I reccomend elevating your roast off of the bottom of the pan on a bed of aromatics, with some stock, or other flavorful liquid underneath. So really any vessel that you can achieve that with is ideal. Btw- dark pans absorb heat more than reflect, they're technically heat sinks. Shiny is better. Tinfoil makes a great reflector, not good for cooking on, but it'll help bounce those infrared radiations towards your foodz:)

Eamon Burke
05-10-2012, 02:41 AM
I use hotel pans (http://www.webstaurantstore.com/4-deep-1-2-size-standard-weight-stainless-steel-steam-table-hotel-pan-anti-jam/92220249.html).

They are not expensive, and they don't have handles. But they do the job mighty fine. Just the other day I made a heaping mess of chicken pasta, and I used it as a saute pan because I knew I would end up putting in a ton of things into one pot and it wouldn't fit in the pan. So I just cook it in the hotel pan. It'll hold up, they last years in pro kitchens.