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DaveRossy
05-12-2012, 05:55 PM
If this has been asked before, could you just point me to the thread:tooth: if not, I could use your help. Been a chef for 20 years and now kinda retired. I am just getting my feet wet with sushi but I have japanese type knives (Globals, A Ken Onion Shun and some others). I'm sure I cant use these (I think) and so have looked at some Gyuto, Usuba and Yanagiba, but with a huge selection of brands does anyone have any that stand out. I dont want to break the bank, maybee $150-250 for each?

If you have any other question.....just shout them out

Thanks everyone.

The hekler
05-12-2012, 06:53 PM
If your just looking to do sushi there is no reason to get a gyuto, and I've seen many professionals make do with a yangi in place of a Usuba for the veggie work. I would just spring for a nice yangi (in fact thats what I did) I'm considering adding a Usuba but it's not needed and a gyuto why a great multipurpose tool is really out of it's element when it comes to sushi at least in my opinion. With single bevel knives it really is needed to go with something of good quality as I hear many of the cheap ones are plagued with uneven blade roads and other problems that make them almost unusable. I went with a Shigefusa for my yangi and have no complaints nor can I ever see buying a replacement. Only problem was the wait which was considerable and is probably longer now.

schanop
05-12-2012, 07:07 PM
For deba, check out blue #2 Sakai Ichimonji Kichikuni 180mm deba at BlueWayJapan ebay store. I think it should be quite good for that price, and probably my current choice for sub $250 180mm deba. Mucho Bocho has just bought one recently. (http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/6182-Awakening-a-new-Deba-and-Usuba-How-would-you-do-it) You can get in touch with him for first hand experience.

Yoshihiro 180mm deba from Jon@japaneseknifeimports should be a good entry point within your budget too. And I probably choose yoshihiro white steel yanagiba from Jon for the budget.

Pensacola Tiger
05-12-2012, 07:42 PM
The best advice I can give you is to give Jon Broida a call. He owns Japanese Knife Imports, and will be happy to take the time to advise you. Here's a link to his website:

http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/

That said, I'll give some generalizations to your question.

You need a deba only if you are going to be breaking down whole fish. If you are not going to be working with whole fish, don't waste your money. If you do need one, there's no need to break the bank. The Epicurean Edge has a great value in a deba for $110 here: http://www.epicureanedge.com/shopexd.asp?id=570

For vegetable prep you can probably use the knives you already own, unless you are planning to get into katsuramuki (http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=katsumaruki&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8#hl=en&client=safari&rls=en&nfpr=1&sa=X&ei=CueuT8G6DdOztwfU_6HbCA&ved=0CBgQBSgA&q=katsuramuki&spell=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=6fbe9a111065e4e9&biw=1273&bih=664).

Buying a yanagiba is where you may want to spend some money, since the quality of your edge will affect the look of the fish you cut with it. Get at least a 27 cm; a 30 cm is better. The reason behind getting a longer one is that sashimi should be sliced in a single pull cut, and the longer the knife, the easier it is to do this.

Hope this helps.

Rick

Eamon Burke
05-12-2012, 07:42 PM
Not being a sushi chef, you don't NEED traditional knives. But they sure are fun, so why not?? I love mine, and I haven't worked sushi in over a year.

You won't need a Deba unless you are breaking down your own fish whole. You wont need an Usuba unless you are trying to make impressive garnishes the traditional way. You will likely get the most use out of a Yanagiba, cutting up the sashimi and whatnot. They are fun knives. I'd suggest some, but they are all out of stock everywhere I look right now. Getting good single bevels at low prices is near impossible.

DaveRossy
05-12-2012, 09:13 PM
Thanks everyone, I sent john an e-mail and I will let you all know what he suggested.I don't plan on cutting whole fish for sushi just yet and I think my 6 inch Global Vegetable knife will get me by so now the search is on for the yanagiba :running:

bieniek
05-13-2012, 05:38 AM
If I would use them only at home I would like to have usuba and yanagiba. No need for deba imfo.

27cm should be suficient for home user, even 24cm. Depends what you like really.
My favourite size is 30cm and 27 feels little too short. But I usually am cutting down whole fish.
At home I could do with 240, easily

JBroida
05-13-2012, 05:46 AM
Thanks everyone, I sent john an e-mail and I will let you all know what he suggested.I don't plan on cutting whole fish for sushi just yet and I think my 6 inch Global Vegetable knife will get me by so now the search is on for the yanagiba :running:

got the e-mail... hope to get to it tomorrow. sorry for the delay.

schanop
05-13-2012, 06:23 AM
Hmm.. don't you guy buy smaller fish whole for home cooking? Other filleting knife might do the job, but not the same as deba.

DaveRossy
05-13-2012, 11:50 AM
I do buy whole fish sometimes and there is great satisfaction in prepping it but since my grocery store (whole foods) has a great butcher, they normally give me what I need. But now thinking about it, I am kinda getting lazy

stereo.pete
05-13-2012, 06:12 PM
I picked up a White #2 270mm Yoshihiro yanagiba from Jon recently and absolutely love it. Not only is it an absolutely scary sharp slicing machine but single bevel knives are incredibly fun to sharpen.

DaveRossy
05-14-2012, 11:36 AM
Thanks everyone, I am going to start a fresh and go with Jon's recommendations, I am going to sell my Global s and Ken Onion Shun and start out with a Gesshin Ginga 240mm Gyuto and then add from there. I do have another question. I am not a big fan of the magnetic knife racks but want something a bit different, sad to say, I used to watch Top Chef and on season 1, one of the chefs, Stephen I think, had a knife rack that looked like a mini samurai sword holder which I thought looked awesome, anybody seen one like that? I have searched the web but to no avail.

Thanks

DaveRossy
05-14-2012, 12:01 PM
OOOhooo, found this by accident.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=EUXWLi_CG_I

stereo.pete
05-14-2012, 12:05 PM
Word on the street is that you will be super impressed by the Gesshin Ginga Gyuto. It should blow you away compared to the Globals and Ken Onion Shun. Congrats! Oh and this never happened unless you post pictures when you receive the knife.

DaveRossy
05-14-2012, 12:31 PM
oh yeah...........try and stop me:lol2: knife porn on its way as soon as it arrives.

Still-edo
05-14-2012, 04:36 PM
OOOhooo, found this by accident.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=EUXWLi_CG_I

I've seen porsches and lamgobrhinis stored in that fashion... But storing kitchenware in that fashion makes me jealous beyond compare.

DeepCSweede
05-14-2012, 05:07 PM
OOOhooo, found this by accident.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=EUXWLi_CG_I

Okay, I am sorry, but that is a lot of work, if I am going that route - I want it hooked up to a motor that brings it up remotely - Maybe Dave could hook up a remote on his board. Or even better, have it linked to my biorithm so that no one else can touch my key knives. My mother in law has that type of deal with her stove fan. It is flush with the counter and raises up at the touch of a button. Pretty cool stuff.

Benuser
05-14-2012, 05:20 PM
If your Global vegetable knife is the GS-5, keep it, don't sell it. It may take a crazy edge. Use it for acidic stuff.

DaveRossy
05-14-2012, 06:03 PM
Yes, it is a G5. I will be ordering a 1000/6000 stone this weekend so I will give it a try, thanks. Another quick question, I have noticed a lot of people are not a fan of Global and Shun (I own both) Not trying to start an argument as I have learned sooooo much here and everyone has been great. Is it the type of metal, Price or something else?

Benuser
05-14-2012, 06:42 PM
Shun: thick and heavy, poor heat treatment, chippy, thick edge, flashy, overpriced, underperformer, aggressive marketing.
Global: design you love or hate, handle, relatively soft steel, some people find sharpening difficult and report hard burr raising and removal. Price.
Twenty years ago, the Globals were the only general public knives coming out of the box with a decent edge. Still use them for hard stuff.

Korin_Mari
05-14-2012, 07:16 PM
I think you already chose a knife, and I'm sure whatever you chose is fantastic (or at least I hope it is). Just a friendly tip, be sure to go through the uraoshi process before using it.

You may already know, but Uraoshi is the conditioning of the flat part of the traditional Japanese knives. If you don't go through the uraoshi process straight out of the box, it will make sharpening difficult and make the blade brittle. I have seen many non-uraoshi knives come back crazy chipped, so I don't want it to happen to you. :(

DaveRossy
05-14-2012, 09:06 PM
Thanks for the info. Jon had recommend a few knives and I am going to start with the Gesshin Ginga 240mm Gyuto. I will look into the "Uraoshi" process as I want to start off strong with my new knives. unfortunately they are out of stock so I will have to be patient for now:curse:

JBroida
05-14-2012, 09:56 PM
uraoshi is for single bevel knives, but you're starting off with a double bevel knife. It is useful to know though when you do get around to single bevel knives. I have a video on it if you're interested.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=cCY5CKkBers

bieniek
05-15-2012, 01:01 AM
Shun: thick and heavy, poor heat treatment, chippy, thick edge, flashy, overpriced, underperformer, aggressive marketing.
Global: design you love or hate, handle, relatively soft steel, some people find sharpening difficult and report hard burr raising and removal. Price.


Shun thick? thick behind edge? underperformer? bs

Not shure weve seen same knives

DaveRossy
05-15-2012, 10:25 AM
I must admit, although I have no experience with Japanese knives (yet) but my Ken Onion Shun is by far the most comfortable knife I have used in about 15 years. I was taught to use the pinch grip in culinary school and that knife moulds to your hand when you use that type of grip. I am embarrassed to say besides steeling, I had my knives sent out to be sharpened but when it came back it was very sharp, obviously I have no real reference that is why I am looking forward to my new knife getting back in stock (you hear me Jon :rofl2:)

Still-edo
05-15-2012, 02:49 PM
Since this is probably a pretty noob question I think this would fit into this thread.

When considering a yanagi for sushi, is it better to go for something thats blue steel, damascus, or SS clad? Wondering how much of a problem discoloration is between the different types.

SpikeC
05-15-2012, 04:28 PM
Get a stainless damascus clad blue steel core one!

Still-edo
05-15-2012, 04:54 PM
Get a stainless damascus clad blue steel core one!

:slaphead: of course lol

phan1
05-17-2012, 04:56 AM
Since this is probably a pretty noob question I think this would fit into this thread.

When considering a yanagi for sushi, is it better to go for something thats blue steel, damascus, or SS clad? Wondering how much of a problem discoloration is between the different types.

Get white #2 steel. Does the job and will likely be the sharpest thing you've ever touched. Anything else would be very expensive...