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Dave Martell
05-13-2012, 12:48 PM
The following is a re-post from a tutorial I wrote back in 2007. This isn't exactly how I do this these days, in fact I do it a lot different (using a tank that I hang the knife into and I buff the blade as a final process before sharpening) but that's because I work on knives for a living - not because this doesn't work. The following procedure is meant as a DIY project for a knife owner to do himself at home.

I hope this helps someone.

Dave

Dave Martell
05-13-2012, 12:48 PM
For awhile now I've been promising a tutorial on how to re-etch damascus knife blades. Many people have expressed interest in this since they have damascus knives that don't look as pretty as they once did. The wear/damage to the knife comes from typical scratches picked up during use as well as the dreaded "Oh crap - I slipped and scratched the side of my knife" while sharpening scenario. OK, I can hear it now, this nevers happens to your knives....yeah right....but for those of us who have had the occasional slip up this tutorial should help get your knives back in factory fresh condition.

I'm going to start off with a strong warning. DO NOT take this procedure lightly. DO pay close attention to the warnings I heed throughout. Serious injury can result to yourself, others, and to your property if you don't pay attention to safety!!

OK, now that I have your attention I'll start with a description of the process with some pictures of the process itself followed up by shots of the finished knife. I'll do a post for each step until I get to the finished knife. This will take a couple of minutes so sit back and hang in there.





http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339117-P1010002.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/59996/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339187-P1010006.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/59997/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339218-P1010011.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/59998/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339250-P1010009.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/59999/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339281-P1010004.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60000/)


The knife I used for this tutorial is one of the most expensive knives on the market - a Hattori KD...in petty form. If I'm not mistaken the knife retails for over $300. This particular knife is well used and has scratches from use as well as a "high polish" job half way up the side of the blade.



http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339739-P1010018.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60001/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339772-P1010026.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60002/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339814-P1010028.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60003/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183339847-P1010033.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60004/)


The blade needs a bit of prep prior to etching. I like to use the least evasive technique possible. In this case I chose to use 600x wet/dry sandpaper that I bought at Lowe's some time ago.

I used a small piece (about 1"x2") sanding from bolster to tip until most of the scratches were removed and the polish section was close in appearance to the unpolished section. I did the whole blade like this.

Follow this with a good thorough cleaning with either a good quality alcohol (90% or better) or with acetone. Wipe the blade until all streaks, fingerprints, and marks have been removed. You want to do this right because any residues left on the blade will show during the etch.




http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183340615-P1010021.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60007/)


OK....now the part to S-L-O-W down and think before proceding. You are about to use an acid which can hurt you, others, and/or your property. You must set yourself up in a place that is well ventilated, has nothing close by that can be ruined if a splash should occur, you should not allow children or pets into this area or anyone for that matter, you should wear crappy clothes, and should dawn safety glasses, chemical resistant gloves, and maybe even a face shield and rubber apron wouldn't be a bad idea either.

Do you get the point yet? This stuff is dangerous and should be respected during use.

Now for the solution...

1. PCB (printed circuit board) etchant/acid purchased at Radio Shack

2. White vinegar

Start by pouring a 50/50 mix of vinegar/etchant. Pour the vinegar in the container first - NOT the etchant I have never seen this happen but I've been told that to pour the etchant in first can cause a flash out when the vinegar is added. I don't know if this is an old knifemaker's tale or not but I don't care to find out and I suggest you play it safe too.

I'm using a Rubbermaid tub as a container but any chemical resistant container will do. Maybe clean out the container first to make sure there's nothing in the chemical solution your using.



http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183341144-P1010039.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60011/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183341174-P1010051.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60012/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183341584-P1010080.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60013/)


There's different ways to go about applying etchant to the blade. Most people soak the blade in a container because some steels require a long soak to achieve the desired contrast. I've done it this way myself and still do when necessasary. How I do it most often though is to just wipe the blade with the etchant using a clean cotton rag. I try this first to see if it will take and then resort to the soaking method if required.

*Note -The reason why I prefer not to soak is it's difficult to get the solution level correct when standing (or laying) the knife in a container without contacting the bolster. This would be my prefered method if I could etch without the handle in place.

So you want to wipe the blade from bolster to tip with etchant. Keep the rag wet (not too wet though as to cause dripping) and keep applying the etchant ensuring to keep the blade free of too much build up and streaking. An even etch is what you're after.

When the blade starts to turn dark you are seeing the contrast begin to appear between the carbon steel (darker sections) and the nickel (lighter sections). Continue this process until the blade is a bit darker than what you expect to see when complete as some of this dark carbon will wash away when neutralizing.

Speaking of which, you will now take the knife to a sink (or hose) and rinse the etchant off of the blade. This is the point at which the etchant will stop working as it's been neutralized. Some people use baking soda either in place of water or in conjunction to water. I've never had to use anything other than water myself.

Now wipe the blade down with alcohol again, wipe dry, and oil. I like Camellia Oil for this but use whatever you want.




http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183342114-P1010106.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60015/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183342157-P1010104.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60016/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183342205-P1010100.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60017/)

http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/fbbuploads/med_1183342236-P1010111.JPG (http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/attachment.php?attid/60018/)


Now we're at the moment of truth - did it work or do we need to do it all again. Many times it does take a second etch to get the desired look and that's no big deal. Just wipe off the oil with alcohol or acetone and go to it again.

In the case of this knife it all worked out great after only 5 minutes of etching time. You can see the finished knife in the pictures above, all sharpened up, bolster shined with Flitz, and ready to be used again with pride.

The total cost in materials was less than $20 to make this $300+ knife look like new again.

So if you've got a damascus knife at home that looks a little uglier than you like just fix it! http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/images/smilies/wink1.gif

kalaeb
05-13-2012, 01:02 PM
Thanks

RiffRaff
05-13-2012, 01:02 PM
Thanks, Dave. It inspired me to do mine, for better or worse.

Dave Martell
05-13-2012, 01:04 PM
Thanks, Dave. It inspired me to do mine, for better or worse.


Your post is what got me thinking about re-posting this tutorial here. I'm glad it helped you. :)

kalaeb
05-13-2012, 02:11 PM
Dave, I have tried to etch some knives with stainless jackets, Carter, Hiromoto etc...every time I do it, it turns the stainless cladding an opaque color. I know you do a lot with Hiromotos, how are you avoiding discoloration on the stainless? Ir are you just refinishing the stainless after the fact?

Dave Martell
05-13-2012, 04:13 PM
Dave, I have tried to etch some knives with stainless jackets, Carter, Hiromoto etc...every time I do it, it turns the stainless cladding an opaque color. I know you do a lot with Hiromotos, how are you avoiding discoloration on the stainless? Ir are you just refinishing the stainless after the fact?


If it's etched quick you can buff or sand (really fine sanding like micro-mesh) the finish back to near stock look but if it's been etched to the point where the surface turns rough then you'd need to do a lot sanding (coarse/med - fine) to return it's shiny look.

I accept some darkening of the stainless as part of the process and don;t go nuts trying to remove it. What I prefer to do post etch is to bring out the shiny bits that remain raised and smooth the surface as much as I can without removing the look.

ThEoRy
05-13-2012, 10:19 PM
Just this week I thinned behind the edge of my nearly 3 year old Ironwood Tanaka. What a nail biting experience. I didn't test the waters or anything I just dove in headfirst by grinding away the bottom third of the blade face on my atoma 140. Yikes!!

I know you didn't want to do this for me last year Dave but I had to take a crack at it. I just needed to return some performance to the blade. It still gets super scary sharp no problem but was feeling wedgy through onions and carrots for a while now. So I ground her up on the atoma which obviously removed some cladding and the etch along with it. Followed that with a bit on the gesshin 400 then the bester 1200. The trick on the stones is to work the mud and use light to no pressure to achieve as close to kasumi as possible.

After she was all buffed out I had to return the etch which I have done myself before on a few blades so no problem there. Just followed standard prep and proper procedure. After finishing the etch it was just dark all over with no contrast. Very muddy and poor looking. No worries though. Break out the micro mesh and start buffing. Removing the etch from the raised spots returns the contrast. Then I break out the natural finger stones and polish for a bit. Clean her up with flitz and buff it off then clean with just hot water and dry with a towel. Then I just did my normal sharpening routine and got her screaming again.

It's not the original look anymore but I knew that going in. I am happy with the results though. It's not perfect but I like the wabi sabi it has now and it has grown on me.

Pics?

sachem allison
05-13-2012, 10:28 PM
of course

ThEoRy
05-13-2012, 11:19 PM
Just so you don't think it didn't happen.
7070

7071

7072

:D Not too shabby.

sachem allison
05-14-2012, 12:11 AM
i like it!

Crothcipt
05-14-2012, 01:19 AM
looks good. Nice go at it.

Dave Martell
05-14-2012, 01:42 AM
Looks good to me Rick :thumbsup:

Justin0505
05-14-2012, 01:09 PM
Thanks for the post Dave! As always, very well organized and thought out and very helpful! I had a Kitaji shig refinished to repair some pin-hole pitting in the cladding that happened during a very humid 2 weeks last summer. I know that it's not traditional, but I then had the blade etched with the muric acid/ PCB acid like in this post. WOW! really great results, the blade looked super cool, and more importantly the etched surface seemed to drastically reduce the famous shig reactivity and and slllooowww things down enough for a really solid and even patina to form over the etching without pitting or over oxidizing.

Anyway, just thought that it would be worth mentioning that, on really reactive blades, an etched finish might be a good alternative or edition to a forced patina.

Crothcipt
05-15-2012, 01:05 AM
When you are adding a acid to anything else (lets say water), you pour the acid in to the water. Other wise you will have a reaction of all the acid wanting to react to the first drop causing a explosion. :angryexplode::devilburn: It's been over 20 years since I took a chem. class, so I'm sure someone could explain it better.

andoniminev
06-12-2012, 01:21 PM
Great post, Dave! I wonder if this would work on Shigefusas kitaeji as the cladding is.............. different than the usual stainless claddings. I dont wonna mess up the cladding.

JohnnyChance
06-13-2012, 01:22 PM
Thanks for the post Dave! As always, very well organized and thought out and very helpful! I had a Kitaji shig refinished to repair some pin-hole pitting in the cladding that happened during a very humid 2 weeks last summer. I know that it's not traditional, but I then had the blade etched with the muric acid/ PCB acid like in this post. WOW! really great results, the blade looked super cool, and more importantly the etched surface seemed to drastically reduce the famous shig reactivity and and slllooowww things down enough for a really solid and even patina to form over the etching without pitting or over oxidizing.

Anyway, just thought that it would be worth mentioning that, on really reactive blades, an etched finish might be a good alternative or edition to a forced patina.

Got any pics?

Pensacola Tiger
06-13-2012, 02:31 PM
Great post, Dave! I wonder if this would work on Shigefusas kitaeji as the cladding is.............. different than the usual stainless claddings. I dont wonna mess up the cladding.

If I'm not mistaken, the Kitaeji finish is produced by polishing, not etching.

Rick

Justin0505
06-13-2012, 04:53 PM
If I'm not mistaken, the Kitaeji finish is produced by polishing, not etching.

Rick

That's how they come from Shigefusa... its a really impressive polish job and not one I've been able to replicate. I can mirror polish, but getting a natural stone finish that both shows the contrast in the blade and is perfectly smooth and even is... "tricky" to say the least.

I posted this in a different thread before, but here's the link to my shige with finish from polishing, etching, and then patina:
7973
gallery: https://picasaweb.google.com/117600618285187025883/MarkoShige#

Pensacola Tiger
06-13-2012, 05:16 PM
That's how they come from Shigefusa... its a really impressive polish job and not one I've been able to replicate. I can mirror polish, but getting a natural stone finish that both shows the contrast in the blade and is perfectly smooth and even is... "tricky" to say the least.

I posted this in a different thread before, but here's the link to my shige with finish from polishing, etching, and then patina:
7973
gallery: https://picasaweb.google.com/117600618285187025883/MarkoShige#

I believe the type of natural polishing stone is the determining factor. Not too long ago Dr Naka was kind enough to provide a set of three fingerstones to some of us. One, and only one, of the stones was capable of replicating the kitaeji finish, or at least that's what I found.

Rick

EdipisReks
06-13-2012, 05:19 PM
When you are adding a acid to anything else (lets say water), you pour the acid in to the water. Other wise you will have a reaction of all the acid wanting to react to the first drop causing a explosion. :angryexplode::devilburn: It's been over 20 years since I took a chem. class, so I'm sure someone could explain it better.

it's not just the possibility of a reaction, pouring the acid second can simply lead to a splash back. you don't want that either. AAA (always add acid).

RoanRoks29
09-13-2012, 10:24 AM
That's how they come from Shigefusa... its a really impressive polish job and not one I've been able to replicate. I can mirror polish, but getting a natural stone finish that both shows the contrast in the blade and is perfectly smooth and even is... "tricky" to say the least.

I posted this in a different thread before, but here's the link to my shige with finish from polishing, etching, and then patina:
7973
gallery: https://picasaweb.google.com/117600618285187025883/MarkoShige#

Hey that is a gorgeous knife it looks great!!

RoanRoks29
09-13-2012, 10:45 AM
Hey So recently a Friend and I decided to give the etching a try. We tried the damascus first then got interested in trying some other things to like the white #2 and some Blue steel as well with different finishes I wish I had all the picks but the one I am most proud of is my Tojiro White #2 petty.
Then I gave it a little cleaning and took off the Kurouchi finish and then we etched it. Then I gave her a little love and polished up the Top to produce a mirrior-ish finish on the top then it goes to a light dim gray on the bevel then to a jet black on the edge. It looks sweet
I think its a pretty sweet Knife now!!
Thanks For the Inspiration!

Justin0505
09-13-2012, 02:41 PM
Hey So recently a Friend and I decided to give the etching a try. We tried the damascus first then got interested in trying some other things to like the white #2 and some Blue steel as well with different finishes I wish I had all the picks but the one I am most proud of is my Tojiro White #2 petty.
Then I gave it a little cleaning and took off the Kurouchi finish and then we etched it. Then I gave her a little love and polished up the Top to produce a mirrior-ish finish on the top then it goes to a light dim gray on the bevel then to a jet black on the edge. It looks sweet
I think its a pretty sweet Knife now!!
Thanks For the Inspiration!

cool, but...

:needpics
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !

jayhay
09-13-2012, 03:22 PM
Welcome Roan! BTW, I work with this guy :)

jayhay
09-19-2012, 11:28 AM
@Justin - Just put up a thread on the etching stuffs Roan and I did. Hope you enjoy the pics!

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/8454-Etching-fun!

wallawally
09-19-2012, 11:04 PM
Thanks for the tutorial.:)

ParJ
09-20-2012, 05:22 PM
I have an old Hattori HD5 I like to re-etch. I'm living in Sweden and we don't have radio shack, so what's the compound in the etchant you use? Iron chloride? Anyone have an idea on what grit finish it's on the HD series, 600 as well?

Cheers

Dave Martell
09-20-2012, 05:34 PM
I have an old Hattori HD5 I like to re-etch. I'm living in Sweden and we don't have radio shack, so what's the compound in the etchant you use? Iron chloride? Anyone have an idea on what grit finish it's on the HD series, 600 as well?

Cheers


Ferric Chloride is what we're using here. The level to which you finish your knife isn't as important as you finishing it as evenly as possible although it does help to go as fine as you can.

ParJ
09-22-2012, 02:07 AM
Naturally it's called ferric not iron... Thanks for the info!

joels747
12-01-2012, 10:54 AM
which acid/s exactly is the etchant composed of?

Lucretia
12-01-2012, 11:07 AM
Here's (https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:zSrIA23xHOIJ:rsk.imageg.net/graphics/uc/rsk/Support/MSDS/2761535_MSDS.pdf+radio+shack+pcb+etchant+msds&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESg6vG9YtCLT2QiYhLJ9o-T8nyqERtLFBGNMlsLCzyZy17vmKLoaXIWoEKkwW4Eo1lpceFyJ gusVxC_zrYIH3Tyv1oXNbXG11aH5H1nbCSewfm8WS7YSR2-3NEXoanisrTJ-bsb2&sig=AHIEtbQiCD23n4fCMSTquNkh_6It9sT7dg) the MSDS for Radio Shack PCB etchant--ferric chloride, ferrous chloride, and hydrochloric acid.

jmforge
12-04-2012, 02:25 AM
primarily Ferric Chloride, Joels. I have etched carbon steel and wrought iron exclusively, so I use FeCl diluted with water, around 4 parts water to one part PCB etchant. You would need stronger stuff for any type of stainless. The slower you etch, the more detail you can pull out of say a hamon. You might dip a blade like that for 10-15 seconds at a time in the diluted FeCl solution and neutralize, rinse and polish off the excess oxides 10, 15 or more times. One the other hand, for a realtively shallow etch on my 1084/15N20 damascus like I used for the gyuto I posted recently, it might on ly one or two etches of no more than 5 minutes and a bit of Simichrome or Flitz and some elbow grease to finish that up. I think that I did one 5 minute etch and then a very short 1 minute etch on that gyuto because I removed the nail polish covering the makers mark and etched it lightly just to give it a tiny bit of color. I was VERY bright silver compared to the rest of the blade befoe that second etch, but I just wanted it to be a bit blue-gray, not to show the pattern inside the oval..

joels747
12-06-2012, 01:29 PM
Thanks Lucretia and jm

ChiliPepper
12-07-2012, 05:58 AM
Uhm, so is it right to say the initial preparation involves polishing the sides of the blades to remove scratches that would otherwise be magnified by the etching process? Would it be feasible to do it with a sufficiently high grit stone (say a 6k) or the sandpaper has some inherent qualities that makes it better at the task? Btw thanks heaps Dave for sharing your knowledge!

Dave Martell
12-07-2012, 02:08 PM
Uhm, so is it right to say the initial preparation involves polishing the sides of the blades to remove scratches that would otherwise be magnified by the etching process? Would it be feasible to do it with a sufficiently high grit stone (say a 6k) or the sandpaper has some inherent qualities that makes it better at the task? Btw thanks heaps Dave for sharing your knowledge!


Hi Chili,
The etchant will remove some light scratches and buff marks but it's best if you can sand the surface smooth and make it even in appearance before etching. It sucks to etch a blade and find a deep scratch still showing.

I would NOT use stones to do this work. Stones are flat and blade sides are not and you will without a doubt hate yourself for having tried the stone method. Sandpaper is flexible and will go in and out of the low and high spots.

ChiliPepper
12-08-2012, 05:44 AM
Got the message! One day I'll find the courage to etch my Hattori HD... posts like this one are great to boost interest and push ppl to experiment, thanks again!

Dusty
12-08-2012, 10:49 AM
Can you over-etch a knife? If so what are the results?

PierreRodrigue
12-08-2012, 11:54 AM
You can forsure over etch a knife. I "forgot" I had a knife in my enchant and went hunting for a week. Now, this is a worst case scenario, but lets just say the blade looked like you pulled it out of a swamp after it being there 100 years. I did manage to salvage some of the damascus, but the acid ate so deeply a 240 mm gyuto I was etching ended up being a petty by the time I ground to clean steel.

jmforge
12-09-2012, 12:51 AM
I am new at this game, but everything that I see says that you can " over etch" a kitchen knife even if you don' t go to the extreme described by Pierre. :lol2: With other types of knives, you might want to etch really deep, especially if you plan to "fill the low spots" by parkerizing or using baking lacquer to enhance the contrast. That might not work so well on knives used for food prep. :biggrin:

Dusty
12-09-2012, 08:43 AM
Ok cool, I'll start slowly then! Thanks.

Justin0505
05-28-2013, 05:19 PM
I finally got around to trying this. PCB etchant was available at my local radio shack, vinegar at target, nitrile gloves and low-lint shop rags, sandpaper, and acetone from the auto parts store, and I already had the glass.

I mixed about 5oz vinegar with 5oz pcb etchant in a med glass jar, and then just cut and wadded up a 6"x6" section of clean rag and dipped it into the solution. I used a pyrex baking pan just as a place to rest the knife and catch drips / run off. I was really amazed at how fast the reaction happens. I bet it would be slower on a stainless knife, but on highly-reactive shig carbon, it was almost instantaneous. In just a few seconds the contrast was super dark and as soon as it looked like it wasn't getting any darker I dunked it in water and then washed it under running water, clean/ cleaned it with a soft, soapy cloth, and rinsed again, and did a final clean and rub-down with another bit of the soft shop rag.

Looks like a great success!! One interesting side-effect is the the areas where the jigane and hagane in the kitaeji meet turned slightly "glittery." Any idea on why? It's not pitting, the surface is still as glass-smooth as when I polished it. Perhaps something to do with the coarse grain structure of the soft iron-like material that shig uses in the cladding?
I'm sure that it will fade as further oxidation / stabilization sets in, but it looks cool.

Some quick phone pics as documentation that "it happened."
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-8VnbfoE4TZA/UaPEhAfjEDI/AAAAAAAAMik/jWVXW_iru1E/w2060-h1165-no/IMAG0028.jpg
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-SahWroTaMTk/UaPE2HyQPNI/AAAAAAAAMis/sCHxrHuft4s/w2060-h1165-no/IMAG0029.jpg

Thanks again to Dave and the other contributors of this great resource thread!

Dave Martell
05-28-2013, 09:04 PM
Nice Justin :)

Oh and I have no idea what the deal is with the glitter. I've seen this myself but I'm no metallurgist.

Justin0505
05-29-2013, 03:28 AM
We need a bat-signal for Larrin...

Draper
08-06-2013, 10:56 AM
So I have a question on etching. Can you etch a non-damascus blade black? For example the Itto Ryu black gyuto. Could that be an effect that could be achieved from ferric chloride on some type of Hitachi steel? Or would the etching just destroy the blade? I'm hoping that someone out there with more experience can give me some insight.

Draper
08-06-2013, 11:00 AM
do you have a pic of this knife anywhere?

btrancho
08-06-2013, 05:16 PM
Can any of you who have done the etching with the ferric chloride tell me the proper way to discard the used acid? It's not something I'd want to toss down the kitchen drain so I'm assuming that there is a way to neutralize it prior to disposal. Or has everyone just bottled it up for future use?

Justin0505
08-06-2013, 05:47 PM
Can any of you who have done the etching with the ferric chloride tell me the proper way to discard the used acid? It's not something I'd want to toss down the kitchen drain so I'm assuming that there is a way to neutralize it prior to disposal. Or has everyone just bottled it up for future use?

After mixing it with vinegar as per dave, I just saved it in a glass jar. Since Dave's method for applying it uses the swab-on method, not the dunk-in, you don't contaminate your solution. In the sealed glass container it hasn't seemed to decrease in potency at all even over several months of storage.

If for some reason you HAVE to dump it, I'd just dilute it waaaaay down with water and then run water down the drain afterwards to make sure that you flush it out of any of the traps / elbows.

ThEoRy
08-06-2013, 11:46 PM
Is that a kagayaki? I achieved a VERY glittery result on that blade.

Justin0505
08-07-2013, 12:59 AM
Is that a kagayaki? I achieved a VERY glittery result on that blade.

shi-shi-shi-shig!

Is the kagayaki also iron high carbon steel?

maybe it's something to do with the combination of the crude, impure ore with the refined, fine grain steel?

ChuckTheButcher
08-07-2013, 01:04 AM
I have tomorrow off. I'm gonna try this. Have a few beaters that could use a bath.

Justin0505
12-12-2013, 12:47 AM
I have tomorrow off. I'm gonna try this. Have a few beaters that could use a bath.

how'd it turn out?

marc4pt0
12-12-2013, 12:26 PM
I tried this last month on my Delbert. Came out awesome, the second time around that is...

http://i1281.photobucket.com/albums/a520/marc4pt0/Del%20Ealy/20131113_145018-picsay_zps158477bf.jpghttp://i1281.photobucket.com/albums/a520/marc4pt0/Del%20Ealy/20131113_144930_zpsed820f75.jpg

NO ChoP!
12-12-2013, 12:42 PM
Wow, that does look nice.

Justin0505
12-12-2013, 07:02 PM
That looks really aweaone. Del's work is very distinctive; nice job bringing it out. Is that his 01 / L6 stuff?

marc4pt0
12-12-2013, 08:10 PM
I believe so, but it's been so long I can't recall

Delbert Ealy
12-12-2013, 10:12 PM
Yes that would be O-1 & L-6.
Looks great Marc.
Del

Steve_P
04-25-2014, 12:04 AM
Has anyone tried this on an HD2? i know its not Damascus but i'm just curious what would happen :P

James
04-25-2014, 10:49 PM
Konosuke HD2? It should just turn dark grey/black.

On a different note, had some post-physiology exam fun and etched a tanaka ginsanko 190 mm

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/--dGjh40f_DU/U1sdjw5XR9I/AAAAAAAAATs/9RdjkUwpM6A/w1185-h889-no/IMG_2264.JPG

ThEoRy
04-26-2014, 12:25 AM
I just did mt Tanaka 240 for the third time last night after my dishwasher decided to scrub it down with a brillo because he "thought it looked dirty".

29palms
05-14-2014, 05:12 PM
I just did mt Tanaka 240 for the third time last night after my dishwasher decided to scrub it down with a brillo because he "thought it looked dirty".

Yeah someone did that to my cast iron skillet once. "surprise we cleaned your nasty pan see it looks like new now"
I was speechless for about 30 seconds. Then they fled the house. :viking:

ThEoRy
05-15-2014, 12:27 AM
This happened the very day after a different dishwasher, although related, cleaned up my hiromoto petty real nice!! Handle too!! 5 hours of my life, gone.