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View Full Version : How kind is End Grain Tasmanian Blackwood on knives?



schanop
05-24-2012, 11:44 PM
I just picked up this board from Peer Sorensen. It is an end grain 50x30x5 cm^3 made of Tasmanian Blackwood (some sort of Acacia). Do you guys have any experience with this wood for cutting board purpose?

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-DrElUNmWCHs/T776QLiu13I/AAAAAAAAAjs/cB6mcSAwtfM/s640/PICT0024.jpg
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-awvKGTbT_VA/T776Rm8GioI/AAAAAAAAAj0/mOMzjhfShGQ/s640/PICT0025.jpg

First impression upon receiving is that it is a well made solid board with nice surface finish. Gotta get start using it soon.

El Pescador
05-24-2012, 11:47 PM
What did you pay? That thing looks amazing!

schanop
05-25-2012, 12:04 AM
On the bay it was 100 AUD or best offer .. + 20 shipping. Board is expensive around here, the other brand that advertises end grain tasmanian blackwood is "the big chop" butcher's block. But that board is too big for be and quite pricey retail.

Lefty
05-25-2012, 04:49 AM
I couldn't tell you, but I doubt it's "worse enough" that you'll notice any big difference.
What I do know, is that's a beautiful frickin' board!

dav
05-25-2012, 06:22 AM
Not sure if its totally applicable re; end grain but that wood has a Janka hardness rating of 1720, to put this into perspective look at the following chart:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janka_hardness_test

Its not perfect but gives you an idea with regards to different species hardness, as it states there are many variables.
Apparently its quite easy to work with although can have a complex structure (tear out common) so I'd say it would be
fine with cutting tools. I'm sure the maker knows his stuff as long as you're not making a board out of a species such as
lignum vitae I'm sure you'll be fine lol.

schanop
05-25-2012, 07:13 AM
Thank dav. I saw that page while researching. Dave's Board Smith FAQ (http://www.theboardsmith.com/purchase.htm) recommends number between 800-1600. 1700 is just a touch above. It seems that a lot of craftsmen in Australia/Tasmania in particular seem to use this wood a lot for cutting board, mostly edge grain though.

I've used it for dinner prep (grilled pork belly, rice, and sea veggie miso soup), so only did a bit of cutting on the board. I can see a lot more of cut marks compared with my previous cheaper boards, so it appears to be a bit softer, at least at the surface level.

Chifunda
05-25-2012, 07:56 AM
I've used a board I made from end grain hard maple and purpleheart (Janka hardness 1860) and haven't found it to be be any harder on edges than my maple Boardsmith board, so I wouldn't worry about it. Good score! :thumbsup:

Mingooch
05-25-2012, 08:26 AM
Very nice looking board

Lefty
05-25-2012, 08:36 AM
Yup, we worry too much about this stuff, really.
It's one hell of a board!

Dusty
05-25-2012, 09:28 AM
I have a tassie black wood end grain board that I bought from a craftsman at a market in Victoria. It's awesome. It can feel a bit 'clacky' sometimes when I'm really going for it, but it seems to be more
Forgiving on my edges than it feels. Love it.

chinacats
05-25-2012, 10:08 AM
Very nice looking board!

Marko Tsourkan
05-25-2012, 11:03 AM
Thank dav. I saw that page while researching. Dave's Board Smith FAQ (http://www.theboardsmith.com/purchase.htm) recommends number between 800-1600. 1700 is just a touch above. It seems that a lot of craftsmen in Australia/Tasmania in particular seem to use this wood a lot for cutting board, mostly edge grain though.

I've used it for dinner prep (grilled pork belly, rice, and sea veggie miso soup), so only did a bit of cutting on the board. I can see a lot more of cut marks compared with my previous cheaper boards, so it appears to be a bit softer, at least at the surface level.

Nice looking board. You might consider mounting rubber feet on one side, so moisture won't accumulate underneath. I can send you some with the knife if you like.

Also, not familiar with the wood, but would recommend oiling the board with mineral oil. At 3cm thickness the board is on a thinner side and could be affected by moisture (warp).

As far as hardness is concerned, you will be fine.

M

schanop
05-25-2012, 05:30 PM
Thank Marko for generosity, I'll take up the offer. So soon, the elder shig brother will find a home. Gotta wait a bit more.

This board is 5 cm/2" thick. On the bay store, they have some smaller and thinner sizes available as well. So Ozie members, please have a look. Bay pictures weren't as impressive as the actual board I've got. Could be because of anything.


Nice looking board. You might consider mounting rubber feet on one side, so moisture won't accumulate underneath. I can send you some with the knife if you like.

Also, not familiar with the wood, but would recommend oiling the board with mineral oil. At 3cm thickness the board is on a thinner side and could be affected by moisture (warp).

As far as hardness is concerned, you will be fine.

M

Burl Source
05-25-2012, 09:49 PM
Stunning Board.
In my opinion you got a bargain.
The Tasmanian Blackwood is easily mistaken for Koa.
The only concern is that both are prone to end grain checking.
But.....that will never become an issue as long as you keep the board oiled and never put it in the dishwasher.

Marko Tsourkan
05-25-2012, 10:01 PM
2" is a good thickness. For some reason I thought it was 3cm.

Although it is made of thinner boards and laid out vertically, for what you paid is a great deal. Looking at a layout, it will be a stable board. I would still attach feet and oil it periodically. I have seen couple of boards warp on me, so better be safe than sorry.

M

Dusty
05-26-2012, 04:55 AM
Mark, what is end grain checking?

The BoardSMITH
05-26-2012, 06:02 AM
End grain checking is a crack that develops near the end of a piece of stock as it dries. As the moisture leaves a piece of wood, the wood shrinks, sometimes evenly sometimes unevenly, which is what leads to cracking. As I stated, the cracks show up mostly at the ends of a piece of stock but they can also be in the middle. When a piece of wood is cut, the ends are coated with a material that slows the moisture loss the minimize checking. Even though it has been coated, small cracks can still appear.

Dusty
05-26-2012, 06:15 AM
Thanks.

Mental note, oil board tonight.

schanop
07-12-2012, 03:25 AM
It's been a month and a half with this board now. I think the board is pretty good for what I paid. The cutting surface is quite kind to knife edge once the surface coating has worn off.

I'm not sure what it is, but the board came with plasticky looking surface that seems to be a bit harder than the actual wood. The coating helps the board resist moisture a little bit, but it seems to be not so kind to thin usuba edge. However, after many cuts, many rounds of oiling, and some quick sanding to smooth out the surface a little, I am quite happy with how it is now.