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chinacats
05-26-2012, 11:25 AM
OK, in another recent thread there was discussion concerning using a pinch vs hammer or pointing grip (finger on spine). I was taught long ago the pinch and have been using it exclusively on larger knives for years, but after having read the thread "which 210mm gyuto should i buy" there was discussion that other grips may be more useful with the lighter j-knives. The thread was directed towards someone with wrist issues, but the way I read the response it was pointing to more of an overall sea-change.

Wondering if there is a general consensus on this or if it is more individual...I have continued to use a pinch with my new j-knives, but now I am starting to be curious if this is the 'right' or most efficient way. Hate to re-learn my technique, but am willing if it is more efficient. As to comfort, I am a home cook so not prepping gallons of mirepoix.:detective:

Cheers,
Chinacats:detective:

sachem allison
05-26-2012, 11:33 AM
just go with what feels right. There is no right or wrong way to hold the knife, it is very individual. Some, may argue otherwise, but they are not the one using it.

Seth
05-26-2012, 11:57 AM
When learning a musical instrument, say classical guitar, you must do very strict body, wrist, and hand positions so that you can break every rule in the book and become a rock & roll genius.

chinacats
05-26-2012, 12:03 PM
Thanks guys, I know I start with a pinch for general use, but depending on what I am cutting, I wind up using different grips as I work my way around/through food. Just wanted to make sure I am not missing out on anything, but at my age I likely wouldn't find a change all that easy anyway:).

slowtyper
05-26-2012, 12:32 PM
I've stopped using a pinch grip on most things in favor of a point, or sometimes the finger just resting on the side of the blade. Also try to keep as light as grip as possible. Its just easier on your muscles I find.

DaveRossy
05-26-2012, 12:53 PM
I was taught the pinch grip in culinary school 20 years ago and still use it but I am looking forward to my new Jknife so I can try another type of grip but......old habits die hard :viking:

stereo.pete
05-26-2012, 02:29 PM
I find that a pinch grip on a wa-handled western style J-Knife is most comfortable to me. When it comes to single-beveled knives and techniques, the game completely changes.

Vertigo
05-26-2012, 02:39 PM
just go with what feels right. There is no right or wrong way to hold the knife, it is very individual. Some, may argue otherwise, but they are not the one using it.

Lol. "Space is mind dust, and stars are but wishes!" C'mon now, Beth Gaga Shaggy, there might be few wrong ways to hold a knife. :lol2:

(Then again, I may have just figured out how you lost that finger... twice!)

obtuse
05-26-2012, 03:34 PM
I use pinch ,hammer and point grip depending on what's being cut.

Justin0505
05-26-2012, 04:18 PM
For me, its dependant on both the knife and the type of cuts im making. Experimenting and getting comfortable with multiple grips and motions is a practical endevor as well as fun.

Wagstaff
05-26-2012, 05:15 PM
I use a pinch on a gyuto, except rarely (just like a western chef's). Slight modifications because of the lack of bolster and some "neck", perhaps - but that depends on the knife. It's basically the standard pinch. Other types of knife, not so much.

Cadillac J
05-26-2012, 08:05 PM
I've always had good knife skills, and always used a pinch with my Forschners and other Euro blades.

So when I first started using j-knives, this is what I started with naturally...but without even knowing it, I've realized that my grip has changed over time, and I have not used a pinch in years--it doesn't even feel good if I try it now. The natural leverage of the blade seems to be diminished and dampened with your hand choked up on it.

This is all my personal opinion, so do what feels best to you. I'm not trying to preach one way being better than the other, just sharing my experience and encouraging others to try another way.

Not that it matters, but just some food for thought--the best cutters don't seem to use a pinch grip on their gyutos.

labor of love
05-26-2012, 08:20 PM
For me, its dependant on both the knife and the type of cuts im making. Experimenting and getting comfortable with multiple grips and motions is a practical endevor as well as fun.
I agree. Lately I've been enjoying pinching my buffalo ferrule instead of the blade. Works for me. I can't wait for someone to tell me I'm doing it all wrong:nono:

The Edge
05-26-2012, 08:39 PM
I've used a pinch grip as long as I can remember. Lately though, I've noticed on some knives that my middle finger slides up onto the blade, and earlier this week, without even thinking about it, I started using the finger point when doing tip work. I feel that the knives are training my hand to use them without my knowledge, so whatever feels most comfortable is best, regardless of what someone else says.

ajhuff
05-26-2012, 09:10 PM
On my gyuto, I generally use a pinch grip. On my petty, I generally use a finger point grip.

-AJ

GlassEye
05-26-2012, 11:06 PM
I have never used the pinch grip, and probably never will. Finger point is one of my primary grips along with some others, it changes with what I am cutting and cutting technique.

VoodooMajik
05-27-2012, 01:07 AM
It depends on which area of what blade I'm using and what I'm doing with it. I tend to point with my middle finger on the bladewhen using the tip especially in the 270+ range, lines everything up nicely. choke up when using the middle of the blade, and almost a loose hammer if I move to the back 1/3 or a very flat blade like a nakiri. They kind of show you how they want to be held. My wrist problems have stopped now because of using better knives and adjusting my technique ( I also stack poly boards with a sani on top to keep my posture straight) If I kept trucking through with the old german blades I probly would be cutting my career short.

tk59
05-27-2012, 01:55 AM
I probably use a pinch and an index-finger-on-the-side grip for just about everything.

hambone.johnson
05-27-2012, 03:41 AM
I have become more loose with my grips lately. I use the finger over the spine for all protiene slicing, both service and butchering, also for specific garnish work, when i am using my 210 i use just the handle, if i use a 240 or bigger, sometimes pinch grip, sometimes just handle. i really use it on a base by base situation. the other thing is that a lack of pinch grip and more handle grip and more finger over spine grip has allowed me to relax and i dont have as much fatigue. ive also changed kitchens in the last 5 months so that always forces you to adapt to a different work space and different hours and type of work. dont be too rigid with your grips, all the formats can be utilized and different knives will work better with different grips too. fluid is best

chinacats
05-27-2012, 12:22 PM
Thanks folks! What I got out of this btw is that ultimately with the lighter knives that the pinch is probably fine, that I should mess around with finger pointing, and most importantly use a grip that will help you relax your hand and arm. I do know that it is nicer to cut when not using a death grip. I grew up playing golf and was always told to grip the club like a bird--not hard enough to hurt it, but not so loose that it could fly away...guessing I should try to relate that to my knives.

Cheers,
Chinacats

Zwiefel
07-22-2012, 08:07 PM
Lol. "Space is mind dust, and stars are but wishes!" C'mon now, Beth Gaga Shaggy...

I LOVE that show...super awesome episode too...

AddictforLife
07-23-2012, 01:03 AM
Pinch grip if I need to use the heel of the knive, point grip when using the whole blade or just the tip. Works wonder on Sujihiki.

K-Fed
07-23-2012, 02:51 PM
Pinch 90% of the time with gyuto and point 90% of the time with suji.