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steeley
06-10-2012, 01:34 AM
Most of these pages are from trade publication's and retail catalog's .
some of the knife makers were folded into other companies or stock were bought up and renamed.

first up REMINGTON
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/KVIsZ.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/pCPni.png

steeley
06-10-2012, 01:37 AM
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/sjeiN.png

steeley
06-10-2012, 01:44 AM
speaking of CLYDE knives .
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/5mESg.png

And you can always use a can opener
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/gNZGm.png

steeley
06-10-2012, 01:53 AM
BRECHT ST. Louis. Sheffield knives
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/92rXv.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/MV9WL.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/CYfvZ.png

steeley
06-10-2012, 01:57 AM
Butcher belt time.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/1IYTu.png

here is some shoes .
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/dn0lj.png

steeley
06-10-2012, 02:05 AM
Butcher steels
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/OaNy7.png

steeley
06-10-2012, 02:12 AM
WILSON Sheffield

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/n9vg.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/Ije8n.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/4ZRto.png

steeley
06-10-2012, 02:35 AM
Joesph Rodgers & sons

interesting Rodgers / Sabatier knife.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/dhBs7.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/09/gmPRH.png

Dave Martell
06-10-2012, 10:56 AM
Nice, I love these pages.

steeley
06-10-2012, 08:32 PM
Little more of J. WILSON

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/U8ulP.jpg

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/5EZNC.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/OCW0k.jpg

steeley
06-10-2012, 08:38 PM
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/MEXZx.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/kQhId.jpg

steeley
06-10-2012, 08:45 PM
CASE BRO'S
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/i9qA1.jpg

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/kqEtY.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/Mj4t9.jpg

steeley
06-10-2012, 08:48 PM
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/rH8qN.jpg

steeley
06-10-2012, 08:53 PM
NORTHAMPTON Cutlery co.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/9eSRd.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/10/rnbsB.png

knyfeknerd
06-10-2012, 09:38 PM
Steeley, you are my hero.

steeley
06-10-2012, 09:43 PM
I will continue to up date this post I am always finding new /old things .
please feel free to jump right in.

steeley
06-12-2012, 12:24 AM
NICHOLS BROS

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/ueWX.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/oD04G.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/13Ez9.png

steeley
06-12-2012, 12:30 AM
You will also notice the Turner's ENCORE brand from Sheffield chopping knife and a bacon knife from Turner.

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/gGKn2.png


and
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/BbO0U.png

Mike Davis
06-12-2012, 12:35 AM
Very awesome stuff!!! Keep it coming!!!

steeley
06-12-2012, 12:35 AM
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/Y6yOs.jpg

Thanks Mike.

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:24 AM
BOKER.

A giant chestnut tree, shading the small Boeker tool factory in Remscheid in the 17th century, is the oldest traceable symbol connected with the Boeker name. Apparently, Boeker tools were very successful, since they were among the leading products in Germany and neighboring countries 100 years later.

Due to the increasing demand in a restless political era, Hermann and Robert Boeker decided in 1829 to begin with the production of sabers. As early as September 1830, the accounting records indicate a weekly production of 2,000 items, made by 64 smiths, 47 grinders and a large number of unskilled laborers

As early as 1900, the majority of articles produced by Boeker were distributed in the US market. H. Boker & Co. in New York concentrated primarily on cutting tools from Solingen. Soon pocket knives became more important than scissors, shaving blades and eating utensils. The demand increased even more rapidly than Solingen was able to supply, so that the Americans in New York began their own production of pocket knives. A little later, pliers were included as well. Since the tree symbol had become well known by then and the various branches of the international Boeker family enjoyed an excellent relationship among each other


The relationship was interrupted during WWII. The Solingen factory burned down completely. None of the equipment, tools, catalog materials or samples was spared. Those few originals from the past we have today survived the war in private homes and were made available to the company. The firm lost one of its most valuable assets: the registration of the tree symbol for the American market was confiscated pursuant to American law. John Boker Jr. acquired it in New York, in order to secure it for the distribution of the American and German products. Soon after the war, the destroyed factory was rebuilt. Those loyal skilled workers who had survived the war, returned and helped with the reconstruction of the building as well as the production, gradually regaining the previous high standard of quality

In the early 60s, Boker USA was sold and eventually acquired by the well-known scissors manufacturer Wiss & Sons. Wiss retained the manufacture of Boeker knives and sold them together with Solingen products. Of course, this meant that the Boeker scissors ceased to be competitors of the Wiss line in the American market. In the early 70s, Wiss sold to Cooper Industries, a multinational company. This new change in America proved to be advantageous for Boker

In 1983 Cooper discontinued its own knife production. Models still in demand are being manufactured in Solingen today. As a result of friendly negotiations, Cooper restored the American trademark rights three years later, providing Solingen with the opportunity to become self-reliant in the huge American market. Thus, in 1986, Boker USA, Inc. was created in Denver, Colorado. Dan Weidner, who has been part of Boker USA almost since its inception, is now the president of the company, working with a young, energetic team.

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/eE3wT.png

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:27 AM
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/3e5ut.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/RxDy.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/GD0rN.png

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:29 AM
Boker today.

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/T4i1P.jpg

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/qvMY4.jpg

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:33 AM
A interesting knife block from Boker.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/TpZHG.jpg

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/V6gq.jpg

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:38 AM
Ok I had to look at that last picture with the knives on the block yes they do have a hole for mounting .

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/ps9eu.jpg

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:42 AM
Now time for a break.... butcher the Waldorf Astoria 1944
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/j3kh4.jpg

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:48 AM
I like the top hat when smoking my fish ,1890

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/ZL0ut.jpg

steeley
06-12-2012, 01:56 AM
and because this is a old timey post section this
notice the horses on top of the redwood.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/rbZP5.jpg

I don't think you heard me
there are HORSES ON TOP OF A CUT TREE.

Crothcipt
06-12-2012, 03:09 AM
Ok I had to look at that last picture with the knives on the block yes they do have a hole for mounting .

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/ps9eu.jpg
well at least they figured out what the holes in the knife should be used for.:beatinghead::outonlimb:

steeley
06-12-2012, 03:20 AM
I was going to say something about jay fischer knifes find a home but i thought better of it.

steeley
06-14-2012, 02:47 AM
Lamson Goodnow

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/h9BHI.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/JiRYX.jpg
1880

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/ASFHN.jpg

steeley
06-14-2012, 02:52 AM
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/gAP6B.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/Uea6R.png

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/0kXbs.jpg

steeley
06-14-2012, 02:56 AM
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/x2vIy.jpg

L&G Factory hammer.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/13/LtC8f.jpg

steeley
06-14-2012, 03:06 AM
In 1834, Silas Lamson devised a curved snath that greatly improved the efficiency of the scythe, and riding the commercial success of his invention, Lamson, his sons Ebenezer and Nathaniel, and partner Abel Goodnow, founded the manufacturing firm of Lamson and Goodnow in Shelburne Falls, Mass., in 1837. Early in its history, Lamson and Goodnow recruited skilled workers from cutlery centers in England and Germany and began manufacturing the high quality knives and tableware that have remained the center of their production ever since.

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/14/bDHFO.jpg

http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/14/hI3bw.jpg

Still-edo
06-14-2012, 06:07 PM
and because this is a old timey post section this
notice the horses on top of the redwood.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/11/rbZP5.jpg

I don't think you heard me
there are HORSES ON TOP OF A CUT TREE.

Wow! I wonder how long it took for them to cut that down!

steeley
06-15-2012, 12:38 AM
Look at the size of that saw.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/14/57oU.jpg

bill was none to bright.
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/14/UoO5p.jpg

wow
http://limepic.com/img/2012/06/14/oG8x4.jpg