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Mike Davis
06-11-2012, 02:21 PM
http://youtu.be/Csok758STJI
This looked pretty cool.

stereo.pete
06-11-2012, 02:41 PM
Yes, I love the concept of every slice of sashimi having its' own condiment. I wish this place was here in Chicago, I am JEALOUS!!!

ThEoRy
06-11-2012, 11:33 PM
I do this all the time at my place. Sushi has such a delicately balanced flavor profile and the last thing I need is for someone who doesn't know any better to completely drown the whole thing, completely saturating it in soy sauce making the whole thing taste like, well, just soy sauce. I'm sorry, call me pretentious if you will, but there is a line I draw in the sand when it comes to this stuff. I let the members have whatever they want in regards to substitutions on everything. But this is where I get to say, "No, that's the dish." Don't get me started on pickled ginger either. It does not go on the sushi dammit!!! It is a palate cleanser!! :spin chair: But I'm just a "kitchen guy" what do I know?

SpikeC
06-11-2012, 11:42 PM
Maybe if you cut more potatoes.............................

stereo.pete
06-11-2012, 11:44 PM
Maybe if you were schooled 1000 ways before you got into the kitchen...

echerub
06-11-2012, 11:46 PM
I like the flavors that the various condiments can add to the mix, but I find it more troublesome to eat the nigiri sushi this way. I normally eat with my fingers, tip the piece onto its side and then when I put it in my mouth it's fish-side down onto my tongue. That's not gonna happen with nigiri topped with condiments. I end up with rice on my tongue first and I find that way I don't taste as much of the nuance in the fish. I enjoy some of the sushi I eat this way, but they are the more strongly flavored sushi.

Call me old-fashioned but I still prefer the "classical" nigiri. The "new" way with condiments looks really nice, but I like actually eating the old style better.

GlassEye
06-12-2012, 12:04 AM
Call me old-fashioned but I still prefer the "classical" nigiri. The "new" way with condiments looks really nice, but I like actually eating the old style better.

I hate all of this new stuff, covered in sauces and piles of stuff, with about twenty different things in the roll. A perfect piece of nigiri without the choice of condiment is the only way, and so difficult to find now.

mhlee
06-12-2012, 12:15 AM
In my personal experience, in Japan, this is normal. Granted, toppings such as herbs, and other condiments are not placed on each piece of sushi, but each piece of sushi is usually dressed with sauce by the chef. No soy sauce, no wasabi to be added by the customer. In Jiro Dreams of Sushi, as I recall, almost every piece of sushi served by Jiro was served with sauce.

ThEoRy
06-12-2012, 12:18 AM
Maybe if you cut more potatoes.............................


Maybe if you were schooled 1000 ways before you got into the kitchen...

Hahahaha

Crothcipt
06-12-2012, 01:18 AM
While in Ohio, we went to a Japanese bbq place. My sis. got just a tuna roll, were as I got a red dragon roll. Guess what one everyone ate? Btw, she put both wasabi and pickled ginger on all her rolls. Except the red dragon roll.

I was proud of her any way just because she would never eat fish as a kid. I always would tell her that fresh fish won't taste fishy but what did I know.

heirkb
06-12-2012, 01:22 AM
How is this a revolution? Hasn't Morimoto been doing this type of thing for a while now?

Anyways, I'm with the guys that like it simpler, but it is still possible to put the fish on your tongue first with this type of sushi.

Crothcipt
06-12-2012, 01:25 AM
yes pull it off the rice. But that isn't sushi anymore it is sashimi. From what I understand.

heirkb
06-12-2012, 01:29 AM
Lol, no. I don't know if you guys have eaten this type of sushi before, but I didn't have any trouble just flipping the nigiri before putting it in my mouth. It was a little messier, though.

Mike Davis
06-12-2012, 01:30 AM
What i normally get is the traditional nigiri. I am always looking for new ways to try it. I have enjoyed all of the nigiri i have tried, but am on the fence about albacore, what i had was dry and fishy. I want to do a US, and obviously Japan sushi tour.

Crothcipt
06-12-2012, 01:33 AM
Lol, no. I don't know if you guys have eaten this type of sushi before, but I didn't have any trouble just flipping the nigiri before putting it in my mouth. It was a little messier, though.
I doubt I have. I would rather do that cutting than go to a sushi place and have it done for me. But I am intrigued.

heirkb
06-12-2012, 01:36 AM
Hmm...I don't know why, but I can't seem to understand your last post Crothpict. I just meant that I would hold on to the nigiri and flip it rice side up at the last second.

GlassEye
06-12-2012, 01:42 AM
I just watched the video, it wouldn't load earlier. This isn't as bad as I was expecting from someone who thinks they have revolutionized sushi, but how is this a revolution?

slowtyper
06-12-2012, 01:47 AM
While in Ohio, we went to a Japanese bbq place. My sis. got just a tuna roll, were as I got a red dragon roll. Guess what one everyone ate? Btw, she put both wasabi and pickled ginger on all her rolls. Except the red dragon roll.

I was proud of her any way just because she would never eat fish as a kid. I always would tell her that fresh fish won't taste fishy but what did I know.
I don't understand this post at all!

Crothcipt
06-12-2012, 02:04 AM
@heirkb I was meaning that I may not have eaten that type of sushi, and I don't go to many sushi restaurants. (not many in land locked Wyoming)

@slotyper My sister never used to eat fish at all. Never would even try a bite, hated even the thought. My sis and nieces, just got a simple roll. The red dragon roll was eel covered with a red sauce (I don't remember what) Everyone ate more of the red dragon roll than the simple ones they ordered.

eshua
06-13-2012, 01:10 AM
I agree that it is common for some pieces to have a garnish...as a point of semantics it looked like his ponzu was ponzu-soy, and eel sauce is largely soy based.

Anytime the garnish is kept to the refreshing side it is more likely to feel clean and or help crisp up a fatty bit.

We do :

yuzu koshu -- scallop
ginger scallion -- bonito
ponzu soy diakon -- oyster
oba -- ika
plum wine -- monkfish liver
powdered miso -- Suzuki
Togarashi -- Albacore

Some I love, some I disagree with and, some I didn't list because they get on my nerves.

My guess about the preference of restaurants use or not use condiments has more to do with ticket times than flavor or tradition.