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Benuser
06-12-2012, 07:28 PM
Today I decided to sharpen a folder I love but rarely use: a BuckLite 426\, end 90's, paid some 90 guilders, (Dutch florins, you know?), some $40 in that time.
Long time ago I've thinned it somewhat: it had a hollow blade with some curious thickening just behind the edge I've removed of
course. Today I made a convex edge ending at some 30 degree inclusive in a few minutes with sandpaper and leather + Cr2O3. It got scary sharp, and the edge is remarkable strong. Fine
grain, no burr issues.
I'm told the steel is 440C. Never seen any kitchen knife in that stuff. Why? Or is there some denomination problem I ignore?

tk59
06-12-2012, 07:39 PM
As far as I know, 440C is a good cutlery steel. It isn't used it high end kitchen cutlery mainly because it is not fine-grained. Any steel will get scary sharp. The question is how long it takes to get there and how long it holds that edge. 440C just won't hold a super fine edge very well.

Justin0505
06-12-2012, 08:46 PM
I think Cutco uses 440A which has less carbon, but more stain resistance than 440C so when the suburban housewife that bought it from her son's friend puts it in the dishwasher, it doesn't rust.

Pensacola Tiger
06-12-2012, 09:26 PM
Ray Rogers made several of his custom kitchen knives out of 440C, hardened to Rc 59.

Rick

tk59
06-12-2012, 09:39 PM
I just realized I have a BuckLite, as well, lol! I think it was my first "real" knife. :)

ecchef
06-13-2012, 01:31 AM
Glestain is also 440.

SpikeC
06-13-2012, 02:03 PM
One of the makers in the "ugly knife" thread talked up the greatness of 440C. As his blades were rather huge he probably could not afford to use anything else, maybe?

EdipisReks
06-13-2012, 04:19 PM
One of the makers in the "ugly knife" thread talked up the greatness of 440C. As his blades were rather huge he probably could not afford to use anything else, maybe?

or maybe just because 440C really benefits from speed holes... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVV_COOey0E)

bieniek
06-13-2012, 04:32 PM
Very interesting it comes up now.

I just had a conversation somewhere else with a person who also claimed 440C would go well in kitchen cutlery. I was wondering how much of it is true.
A metallurgist. Very knowledgable about steel, but thats not everything I guess.

SpikeC
06-13-2012, 04:44 PM
It depends on The cutlery, I suppose.

obtuse
06-13-2012, 06:22 PM
I'm sure it would produce a nice toothy edge at 60rc. 19c27 isn't too far away in composition.

tk59
06-13-2012, 07:01 PM
I'm sure it would produce a nice toothy edge at 60rc. 19c27 isn't too far away in composition.+1. Although I'm not so sure it's really all that close to 19c27. It has a fair bit more chromium, not to mention a sprinkling of other stuff. Taking 5-7% of your iron and switching it to 5-7% of other stuff is pretty significant, if you ask me.

obtuse
06-14-2012, 12:53 AM
I guess 19c27 sacrifices some stain resistance if the accounts of ultimatums developing patinas are correct.

Lefty
06-14-2012, 06:45 AM
I think I might have two of the best kitchen blades ever made out of 440C. They still need some finishing up, but yes, at 60hrc, it seems to perform a lot better than one might think. I haven't tested the edge retention out enough to say much, but it does take a nice "scary sharp" edge.

olpappy
06-14-2012, 07:31 AM
Nothing wrong with 440C, it can make a great knife especially if done by a custom maker who knows what he's doing. It tends to be less popular since 154CM can hold an edge a bit longer, at the expense of some corrosion resistance. Both are larger carbide steels, but then so are D2, 19C27, and probably the semi-stainless steel Japanese clones of D2 as well. Sandvik, Devin Thomas and others favor the small carbide steels for kitchen knives because the thin edges need edge stability, but in general the user feedback on kitchen knives with the steels mentioned above seems very favorable. Personally I wouldn't mind seeing more knives in 440C, since corrosion is an issue where I live.

tk59
06-14-2012, 05:59 PM
You have trouble with AEB-L, 19c27, etc. corroding? How about the pm stainless steels?

ecchef
06-14-2012, 08:32 PM
Spend some time @ my shop. Even plastic rusts here. :cry:

obtuse
06-16-2012, 11:12 PM
Where I'm living I have to oil all my knives after use, even my stainless ones. I've had VG-10 and CPM 154 rust, even Henkels have discolored over time. The cutco is still doing fine.

pennman
06-27-2012, 03:27 PM
Glestain is also 440.

I thought Glestain was Acuto (propriatory) steel whose composition was not published. I have a custom Chalef knife from 440c and they definitely do not sharpen the same or hold an edge the same.

tk59
06-28-2012, 12:24 AM
Heat treatment can have a significant effect on the characteristics of a steel. That said, Glestain is the only 440C blade I keep in my collection.