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View Full Version : What knife set to buy...?



rxfoote
06-25-2012, 11:42 PM
I'm sure everyone gets tired of this, but I have spent the last couple of weeks reading reviews, visiting local stores, checking out knife sets and really can't decide on what to get.

I am by no means a Professional Chef, but love to cook and would like to purchase a nice knife set. I haven't really decided on a budget and am more concerned about making a good decision.

I like the idea of Shun, Global, and Mac but too be honest am concerned that being a hack will damage/chip the blades. I have tried Wusthof knifes and like them. I understand the differences, and wonder if due to my inexperience I might be better off with a German knife? Lastly, I have a friend that owns a set of Gunter Wilhelm knives and absolutely swears by them. Any thoughts on these knifes? I'm also not set on buying an actual set and like the idea of piecing together specifically what I need.

Thanks in advance!

Mingooch
06-25-2012, 11:59 PM
No idea on the Gunter Wilhelm knives.

Are u sold on a set? rather than just getting some great knives that fit your needs and uses?

Dont be scared off about reviews where japanese knives chip etc. They are vasty superior, pretty durable, and just plain better overall. 3-4 great knives will be pretty much what u need.

Pensacola Tiger
06-26-2012, 12:03 AM
Welcome to KKF!

You will likely get a number of replies that will mention specific brands, and others trying to dissuade you from buying a set of knives. Rather than that, I'd like to suggest that you buy and read Chad Ward's book, An Edge in the Kitchen: The Ultimate Guide to Kitchen Knives -- How to Buy Them, Keep Them Razor Sharp, and Use Them Like a Pro. It will give you an excellent grounding in what knives you actually need. It's available at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0061188484.

Rick

rxfoote
06-26-2012, 12:08 AM
Wow, thanks for the quick replies! No, I'm not set on a set. I'm sure I'll only really use 4 knives as well as would like a nice steak knife set. Thanks on the tip, I'll order the Chad Ward book tonight.

ThEoRy
06-26-2012, 12:22 AM
How bout 2 or 3 really good knives. You don't need a set. Also, I'd steer clear of Shun and Global. There is far better steel out there for a much better price.

obtuse
06-26-2012, 12:24 AM
You really only need a good chefs knife (gyuto) a utility (petty) knife and maybe a bread knife. I suggest looking at the carbonext series, konosuke HD series, kikuichi tkc, gesshin ginga. You have your choice of carbon, semi stainless and stainless steels. Prices ranging from $120 to $250 for a 240mm gyuto in those lines. More to come.

rxfoote
06-26-2012, 12:47 AM
Theory - What do you recommend then? Thanks!

chinacats
06-26-2012, 01:17 AM
Welcome! I too would recommend a few select knives. Enjoy!

Should look through the thread on which knife to buy...some of the questions will help you decide which direction you want to go.

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/2058-Which-knife-should-you-buy

rxfoote
06-26-2012, 12:06 PM
Ok, so I think I have decided to get 3 to 4 good knifes and a set of steak knifes. Right now I have decided on the first knife as - Konosuke HD 210mm Gyuto. Any reasons why not to get this? Thanks!

macmiddlebrooks
06-26-2012, 12:13 PM
Kono's run a little small, take a look and see if you have enough board space for a 240mm.

kalaeb
06-26-2012, 12:47 PM
Okay, not sure what your budget it...here is what i would do
Gyuto-DEvin Thomas with AEBL-240 mm
Petty-Hiromoto 150 mm
Bread knife-tojiro itk
Steak knives-Warther

obtuse
06-26-2012, 01:19 PM
If you can find the DT ITK is stock :( I think it's the one knife I've always wanted but never will have.

kalaeb
06-26-2012, 01:24 PM
If you can find the DT ITK is stock :( I think it's the one knife I've always wanted but never will have.

Try epic edge, they have a 270 left.

Or contact Devin direct.

oivind_dahle
06-26-2012, 01:30 PM
For a home chef 210 is long enough.
The Konosuke is a great choice, its a killer knife.
There are several Konosuke however. HD, Silver, Stainless, ZDP, white

I would go for a petty and a parer as well. There is a bread knife and a parer in the B/S/T section atm.

rxfoote
06-26-2012, 08:40 PM
Thanks for all the replies!

Here is my list so far;
Konosuke HD 240mm Gyuto
Forschner 12" Cimeter - for tougher jobs as I'm worried about using the Japanese knife at first.
MAC Honesuki 6" Boning knife
Masamoto Petty Knife
Tojiro 270mm ITK Bread knife
Tojiro Steak knives

I think that should do it for now... - any recommended changes? Next on to sharpening. I can use a steel, but am not real experienced beyond that. What is a good recommendation for a sharpener? Thanks!

mhlee
06-26-2012, 08:57 PM
Thanks for all the replies!

Here is my list so far;
Konosuke HD 240mm Gyuto
Forschner 12" Cimeter - for tougher jobs as I'm worried about using the Japanese knife at first.
MAC Honesuki 6" Boning knife
Masamoto Petty Knife
Tojiro 270mm ITK Bread knife
Tojiro Steak knives

I think that should do it for now... - any recommended changes? Next on to sharpening. I can use a steel, but am not real experienced beyond that. What is a good recommendation for a sharpener? Thanks!

I'm curious as to what jobs would you be using your Cimeter for. The reason why I ask is because they're not really inexpensive, and there may be better knives out there for your intended use.

rxfoote
06-26-2012, 09:16 PM
I'm curious as to what jobs would you be using your Cimeter for. The reason why I ask is because they're not really inexpensive, and there may be better knives out there for your intended use.

My thoughts were melons/squashes/pineapple, anything I'm not real comfortable with at first with the Gyuto...

rxfoote
06-26-2012, 09:24 PM
Any reviews/opinions on Vulkanus Sharpeners? Thanks!

I've seen the Edge Pro's but not sure I'd feel confident using them...

obtuse
06-26-2012, 09:40 PM
Squash, melons, pineapple are the best things to use a thin gyuto for. Splitting chickens, you want a western deba.

Pensacola Tiger
06-26-2012, 09:49 PM
Any reviews/opinions on Vulkanus Sharpeners? Thanks!

I've seen the Edge Pro's but not sure I'd feel confident using them...

Run away as fast as you can from the Vulkanus Sharpener. It is a knife destroyer, not a sharpener.

If you do not care to learn freehand sharpening, then the Wicked Edge or Edge Pro devices are worth looking into. The Wicked Edge gets the nod from me because it is capable of sharpening an asymmetrical knife - most Japanese made knives, including the Konosuke HD, are asymmetrical.

Rick

mhlee
06-26-2012, 10:05 PM
Squash, melons, pineapple are the best things to use a thin gyuto for. Splitting chickens, you want a western deba.

+1

I didn't believe it until I tried it myself. A thin gyuto like the Konosuke will be fine. A cimeter certainly isn't going to be much better, if at all, for those jobs IMHO. I have a Forschner Rosewood 10 inch breaking knife that I rarely use now; I occasionally use it for ribs and brisket, but never for chicken.

A western deba would be good for splitting chickens, or you could just buy a thicker, more durable gyuto for your sturdier tasks. I use my old Global G-2 for those kinds of tasks.

add
06-26-2012, 11:14 PM
Perhaps, s-c-i-m-i-t-a-r... ?

Or, am I missing something (again), lol.

Pensacola Tiger
06-26-2012, 11:23 PM
Perhaps, s-c-i-m-i-t-a-r... ?

Or, am I missing something (again), lol.

Same knives: scimitar == cimiter == scimiter.

mhlee
06-26-2012, 11:28 PM
It's "Cimeter."

http://www.victorinox.com/us/category/Category/Slicing-Carving/Rosewood-Handle/2072?f=category&v=2/200/2070/2072&m=add&

add
06-26-2012, 11:43 PM
... so regardless of splellin then, upswept banana blade ?

mhlee
06-26-2012, 11:51 PM
Whether it's spelled correctly according to a dictionary is irrelevant. It's the name of a particular item made by a certain maker. Nonetheless, it is an accepted word. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cimeter

But yes, it's a curved, pointed, butchering or slicing knife.

chinacats
06-27-2012, 12:12 AM
+1

A western deba would be good for splitting chickens, or you could just buy a thicker, more durable gyuto for your sturdier tasks. I use my old Global G-2 for those kinds of tasks.

Just curious as to why the western deba would be better than a regular or mioroshi (sp?)...I think I know the difference, just not the practical difference. :newhere:

Thanks

GlassEye
06-27-2012, 01:33 AM
Just curious as to why the western deba would be better than a regular or mioroshi (sp?)...I think I know the difference, just not the practical difference. :newhere:

Thanks

Western deba is double bevel, more robust behind the edge. The single bevel true deba is still on the delicate side, I would not be comfortable trying to split a chicken with one.

daveb
06-27-2012, 03:54 AM
My banana knife has R.H. Forschner and Victorinox seal stamped on it. Model 803-10 Best used at deer camp, around the smoker and to frighten the nieces and nephews. Quick google shows it spelled 2 maybe 3 ways.

I'm going to zerox this page so I can keep it as reference.