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Marko Tsourkan
04-11-2011, 12:57 AM
This is a question for knife-makers on this forum.

What container do you guys use to oil quench your blades?

How tall the container need to be to quench efficiently?

Thanks,

Marko

Delbert Ealy
04-11-2011, 08:28 AM
Mine is a piece of square tube with a steel plate welded to the bottom. I think mine is 20 inches. I would recommend 2 inches longer than the longest blade you plan to make. Larger volume is important if you plan to heat treat more than a few blades at a time.

l r harner
04-11-2011, 09:45 AM
i have an old ammo can for a tank but like dell in will be making a long steel pipe into a tank

Marko Tsourkan
04-11-2011, 10:02 AM
Sounds great. I have a thick porcelain umbrella stand, about 18 inches tall and 10 inch in diameter (holds about 2.5gal of oil) that I plan on using until I get a replacement. I was thinking of getting an old milk can or a fire extinguisher with a cutoff top, but maybe I should look into getting a pipe and have the bottom piece welded to it.

M

StephanFowler
04-11-2011, 10:20 AM
whatever you use, you will want to be able to cap and seal off the top.

most metallurgical oils can suffer from humidity over time. Also if you get a flare up the best way to deal with it is to cap it off and starve it of oxygen.

(I use a 4x4 square tube with a base plate welded on, I am going to a 6" round soon)

Marko Tsourkan
04-11-2011, 10:24 AM
Sorry for a stupid question. Where can one normally get a steel pipe in larger diameter, say 24" long by 10" wide? I looked up prices for steel pipes online and got a whooping $194 quote before shipping for 24x10".

M

Delbert Ealy
04-11-2011, 12:19 PM
Marko,
check some of your local machine and fabrication shops, and ask them for drops around the size you are looking for, drops are smaller pieces leftover from other jobs. You might not get exactly what you are looking for, but sometimes you get lucky. Also ask for schedule 40(1/4" i think) well casing. Its basically 1/4" wall steel pipe and works perfect. Don't be too choosy on your bottom plate either, other than bigger is better and more stable. Check out drops for the base plate too. Tell the guys what you are doing and they should be happy to help. I have a couple of shops that I get stuff from now and then, and sometimes they toss some of the smaller pieces in for free. Remember they are leftover pieces and they are usually willing to let them go for cheaper, and if you get drops, just take them as is. It will cost you more if you ask for cuts. You may have to hit two or three of them to get what you want. I think you can get the tube and base plate for around $100 and maybe a lot less. My best haul was a 4 foot section of I-beam for $75 that weighed 300 lbs.

Marko Tsourkan
04-11-2011, 12:31 PM
Thanks. Will see what I can find.

jjparkinson
04-11-2011, 01:30 PM
Thanks. Will see what I can find.

It could also be worth looking for an old scuba tank as they cut them in half when they fail a pressure test. They're either made of steel or Aluminium and would be about the right size.

SpikeC
04-11-2011, 02:01 PM
I just realized that welding the bottom plate on is not really necessary. JB Weld™ will do the job! I have a chunk of old iron sewer pipe that I think I will make a tank out of.

RRLOVER
04-11-2011, 09:55 PM
I just realized that welding the bottom plate on is not really necessary. JB Weld™ will do the job! I have a chunk of old iron sewer pipe that I think I will make a tank out of.

You can put a plug with an mj on sewer pipe and watermain.I was going to use a chunk of watermain for my tank when i start HT my stuff.

Delbert Ealy
04-12-2011, 09:50 AM
I just realized that welding the bottom plate on is not really necessary. JB Weld™ will do the job! I have a chunk of old iron sewer pipe that I think I will make a tank out of.

I have been thinking about this since you posted, and I finally can't stand not saying anything. Please don't use Jb weld, it may work for a short period of time, but it will fail, and you may wind up with a hot oil spill.

SpikeC
04-12-2011, 03:04 PM
My experience with JB Weld™ shows that it can be used in this context. I dropped a BMW K1200 motorcycle onto the left side, where the valve cover is, and punched a hole in the bottom of the cover, allowing oil to escape. I was in the middle of nowhere and had to make a fix on the spot. A friend that was riding with me had some disposable diapers that he used to clean his face shield, I cut a piece of that and embedded some of the JB Weld™ into the fabric, then affixed the patch to the cover after wiping it with gasoline to clean it. Many thousands of miles later the "temporary" patch was still in place and oil tight!
Do not underestimate the power of JB Weld™!