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mhenry
07-07-2012, 10:00 AM
I am in the market for a new suji and I have kinda chosen either of these. This is based mainly on the steels. I have been wanting to try them for awhile, they are both beautiful knives too. The Yosh is highly regarded and proven, but I don't know jack about the Sakai Takayuki. So I am just looking for some input on the knives especially the Sakai, the steels, how they may compare, and what you guys might suggest.
Thanks

knyfeknerd
07-07-2012, 10:33 AM
Both of those handles are terrible! Hey, I know a guy.......

echerub
07-07-2012, 11:02 AM
Terrible handles? Say what? Simple and minimalist handles are nice too :)

As for the original question, I'm not able to help much there yet :)

mhenry
07-07-2012, 11:09 AM
I'm all over the handles, but what knife?

SameGuy
07-07-2012, 11:14 AM
Yep, I like the minimalist, function-before-form look. I like mid-century modern. Heck, I even like a lot of IKEA stuff.

Then again, I can't wait to get a nice, mismatched set of "minimalist" custom handles from the various handle craftsmen here. :)

Mike, I can't answer about the knives themselves other than to say they probably both passed through the same sets of hands in the same workshops in Sakai. Personally I'm not a fan of suminagashi, but I'm even less a fan of the hammered look. Have you considered the current flavor-of-the-month Sakai Yusuke? That will likely be the source of my next knife (petty).

Pensacola Tiger
07-07-2012, 11:15 AM
I'm all over the handles, but what knife?

I don't see a problem, there are two handles and two knives, right?

El Pescador
07-07-2012, 11:18 AM
SKD.

kalaeb
07-07-2012, 11:46 AM
I cant comment on the ginsan, but my skd suji is nice to use.

bkdc
07-07-2012, 12:45 PM
I own the SKD Yoshikane in gyuto form. It's got a thick spine, but still fun to use. If you're using the suji to slice meat and fish, then the thickness at the spine won't matter much. My Yoshikane has a great grind. SKD11 is a hard tool steel from a recipe that's been around forever and it can definitely be tempered harder than G3 and can take a nice steep edge. It's not as if you're going to abuse the edge on a suji.

Oh... the ho-wood handle sucks. :)

bieniek
07-07-2012, 02:00 PM
to say they probably both passed through the same sets of hands in the same workshops in Sakai.

Ill be damned if its true for Yoshikane. For the brand producing in Niigata...

Either of those will be great for sure.

I like the nimble looks of the sakai takayuki more, I was actually ready to order it, if it wasnt only available from **** & I wouldnt ordered 27 masamoto.

I have a petty in SKD and while i think it is great steel for petty and chefs knife I would like other kind of edge[steel] on a slicer.

EdipisReks
07-07-2012, 02:33 PM
I can't answer about the knives themselves other than to say they probably both passed through the same sets of hands in the same workshops in Sakai.

i doubt it.

tk59
07-07-2012, 02:45 PM
i doubt it.+1.

I have a Yoshikane wa 270 and a friend of mine has a western 270. Same steel but the western is thick and massive while the wa is actually quite thin. I like the steel. Sharpening is not the greatest but edge holding is quite good. I would recommend it at that price point. Maybe you can get Jon to have a Gengetsu suji in semi-stainless made. I'm really liking that steel. Edge holding is very good on that and sharpening is quite easy but it is tougher than Heiji steel, for example.

JBroida
07-07-2012, 02:58 PM
i doubt it.

for sure not... they're from different cities

RRLOVER
07-07-2012, 03:04 PM
I remember reading on KF that the sakai was a bit chubby and I don't think the review was great. BTW I love that koa handle,that wood is to beautiful to put a ferrule on the handle.

mhenry
07-07-2012, 04:40 PM
Thanks Guys. I don't do any real delicate slicing, this will be mainly a BBQ knife so a little thickness and toughness is OK. It will also see some cutting board action too.

bkdc
07-07-2012, 06:37 PM
If you're going to beat up on your knife a little, go for the softer steel (that would probably be ginsan) But just as important is the geometry of the knife for your purpose.

stereo.pete
07-07-2012, 07:39 PM
Go with the Yoshikane Mike, I have one that Marko touched up a bit and I love it!

Andrew H
07-07-2012, 08:15 PM
Thanks Guys. I don't do any real delicate slicing, this will be mainly a BBQ knife so a little thickness and toughness is OK. It will also see some cutting board action too.

Is the ginsan tall enough for board action? I think the yosh would fit that role much better.

SameGuy
07-07-2012, 08:45 PM
Sorry guys. Thought for sure Yoshikane was Sakai not Sanjō... and ignorantly didn't look it up. Paul's had a 240 suminagashi ginsanko Takayuki gyuto a while back and it was almost too pretty for words. Fairly porky spine near the handle, but really nice looking. Not too too heavy if I recall.

obtuse
07-08-2012, 06:06 AM
I would go for the yoshikane, I like my gyuto a lot and SKD 11 would make a great slicer.

JKerr
07-09-2012, 03:01 AM
Can't comment on either steel, though I recall KCMA saying ginsan was his fav stainless as it behaves similar to some carbon i.e. gets super sharp and sharpens really easily, edge holding is nothing special though. Salty has a video of a takayuki ginsan wa gyuto (not damascus, but I believe from the same craftsman) which he seemed to hold in high regards. These instances are relevant to gyutos though, not sujihikis.

Cheers,
Josh