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Dream Burls
07-14-2012, 03:20 PM
Not sure if this has ever been covered, but I was wondering how you knuts clean your knifes just before you store them. A trick I read about was to place the bladee flat against the side of the sink to give it total support. What else do you do and/or use?

EdipisReks
07-14-2012, 03:27 PM
soap and water, sponge, towel. a wipe of camellia oil if the knife is going to be stored for a long time. that's it. i don't know what you mean about placing the blade against a sink for support.

Dream Burls
07-14-2012, 03:35 PM
If you place the blade against the side of the sink with the handle above the rim of the sink the blade can lay flat against the sink. Then you can use some pressure without bending the blade.

EdipisReks
07-14-2012, 04:07 PM
i have never needed to apply much pressure to a knife to clean it. then again, i use almost all carbon knives and they get wiped off constantly during use.

Namaxy
07-14-2012, 04:12 PM
soap and water, sponge, towel. a wipe of camellia oil if the knife is going to be stored for a long time. that's it. i don't know what you mean about placing the blade against a sink for support.

I do essentially the same thing. Never used the sink trick. I wipe the knives constantly as I go...though I can't seem to stop cutting my towels :curse:

jayhay
07-14-2012, 04:13 PM
^ What he said, warm/soapy water, then towel dry.

Don't really get the sink thing. I never really need to "scrub" my knives, unless I'm trying to remove a patina. I usually wash then with a folded kitchen towel, as SS scrubbies are too abrasive. And where I work green acrylics are more rare than a bigfoot sighting.

Pensacola Tiger
07-14-2012, 04:15 PM
If you place the blade against the side of the sink with the handle above the rim of the sink the blade can lay flat against the sink. Then you can use some pressure without bending the blade.

Why would you need to put that much pressure on a blade?

EdipisReks
07-14-2012, 04:18 PM
I do essentially the same thing. Never used the sink trick. I wipe the knives constantly as I go...though I can't seem to stop cutting my towels :curse:

wipe the knife edge up, with the towel forming a "u" shape at the spine. i quit cutting towels when i started doing that. make sure your thumb doesn't go over the top, when you wipe.

Dream Burls
07-14-2012, 04:40 PM
Why would you need to put that much pressure on a blade?

I guess you don't. Just something I picked up along the way. Keeps the knife very still and secure. Different strokes...

EdipisReks
07-14-2012, 04:53 PM
I guess you don't. Just something I picked up along the way. Keeps the knife very still and secure. Different strokes...

seems like that method provides lots of opportunities to damage your edge. i like to keep my knives away from metal.

ajhuff
07-14-2012, 05:02 PM
If you place the blade against the side of the sink with the handle above the rim of the sink the blade can lay flat against the sink. Then you can use some pressure without bending the blade.

I do this. No issues.

-AJ

Citizen Snips
07-14-2012, 05:36 PM
soap and warm/hot water. i usually only need to use my hands but a damp cloth can go a long way.

every so often i use a scrubby pad on the handle and re-apply my oil and homemade wax

Citizen Snips
07-14-2012, 05:37 PM
seems like that method provides lots of opportunities to damage your edge. i like to keep my knives away from metal.

i always keep mine away from metal as well.

i made a sink bridge out of 2x4s and that provides me with flat surfaces if i need them to remove patina or serious sandpaper/fingerstone work

Crothcipt
07-14-2012, 08:56 PM
I had to use the side of the sink today. I was making 50 orders of potato skins. The knife gets a ton of starch build up. Getting a green scrubby is near impossible so I used a towel and the side of the sink. The edge was no were near anything to get messed up. Oh ya and very hot water.

Dream Burls
07-14-2012, 10:22 PM
soap and warm/hot water. i usually only need to use my hands but a damp cloth can go a long way.

every so often i use a scrubby pad on the handle and re-apply my oil and homemade wax

What kind of oil and wax do use?

cookinstuff
07-15-2012, 01:50 AM
A big +1 on the cooked potato, like fingerling or mini potato, cutting alot of those by the time you are done, you will have a knife that can't just be wiped off, gotta scrub it. Same if your doing alot of beef and salmon can get sticky, but usually it's easier to keep your knife clean breaking salmon down. I hardly wipe my blade after every potato I cut though, if I did, I would lose my job hehe. At the end of the night, I take my knives to the cappucino machines hot water dispenser and get a yellow/green scrubby and some soap water, I lay my knife flat on the table with the handle off the edge. Scrub the table first of course, or just throw a towel or newspaper down. I guess it's the same as the sideways sink method, just always gone right on the 'metal' table, no scratching or chipping. Tsubaki oil if it's going away for long, but I don't oil my knives generally, just my Doi.

AddictforLife
07-15-2012, 02:09 AM
I just clean it with a wet towel and water, then dry it up with a dry one.

DwarvenChef
07-15-2012, 05:02 AM
At work when I clean up (I'm the closer) I get to find all the knives stashed away that have not been cleaned all day... joy... they have stopped listening to me about knife care... I have a small butcher block (poly) that I set on the side of the sink and use to add pressure to the towel on the blade. I set the edge on the block and rub off the gunk that doesn't soak off. Dexter get this treatment every night just because it's so heavy that one slip and a normal wiping will pass right through the towel :p