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Keith Neal
07-19-2012, 09:00 PM
This has been bothering me ever since I have been involved in this group. It seems that most of the vocal people like patina. But I don't like my knives looking dirty. I am trying to learn to appreciate patina, but it just doesn't work. I like to keep my knives looking new and crazy sharp.

Especially the beautiful Galaxy knife by Randy Hass.

Are there any other folks who agree, or am I just lost in the void?

Andrew H
07-19-2012, 09:04 PM
I don't like patina on my SS knives. Other than that...

Crothcipt
07-19-2012, 09:08 PM
You not lost at all. Patina is a eye of the beholder thing. I wouldn't keep patina on the Galaxy either. For me it just depends on the knife. I like blue, so I don't change the patina on my Tanaka's just because they are very dark blue. But carbons it depends on the blade and the knife, and how reactive it is to foods.

Pensacola Tiger
07-19-2012, 09:25 PM
Keith, if you don't care for the look of a patina, then by all means scrub it off and keep your knives shiny. On a damascus blade, you just have to be careful not to polish off the etch that gives it depth.

Rick

SameGuy
07-19-2012, 10:01 PM
My aoko nakiri has developed a fairly dark blue patina after very few, short uses with tomatoes and onions, and it caught me off guard because the the much-more-used shiroko gyuto is almost pristine by comparison. I'm 50/50 on patina.

DwarvenChef
07-19-2012, 10:16 PM
The more Patina the better :) If the blade doesn't darken I have no use for it :p

Yes even a Galaxy would look even better with a well built patina :)

Come to the dark side, it's fun :)

ajhuff
07-19-2012, 11:00 PM
This has been bothering me ever since I have been involved in this group. It seems that most of the vocal people like patina. But I don't like my knives looking dirty. I am trying to learn to appreciate patina, but it just doesn't work. I like to keep my knives looking new and crazy sharp.

Especially the beautiful Galaxy knife by Randy Hass.

Are there any other folks who agree, or am I just lost in the void?

Meh. Follow your own drum. Look for me out there in the void, after all I'm the guy who questioned hamons. :whistling:

-AJ

markenki
07-19-2012, 11:28 PM
Apparently, sushi chefs don't like patina either. Their knives always seem to look nice and shiny. Do what pleases you. :)

Crothcipt
07-19-2012, 11:32 PM
With sushi, its about the flavor of the fish. So with patina you have a chance of something getting passed along to the next. They scrub handle to tip between each fish.

Customfan
07-19-2012, 11:42 PM
Interesting observation about sushi chefs.. never thought of that...

I have knives that I like with patina and others that I don't... Depends on the type and use. I say, whatever makes you happy Keith.... Give it a try!

:viking:

GlassEye
07-19-2012, 11:53 PM
No patina on single bevel knives, heavy patina on double bevel knives.

chinacats
07-20-2012, 01:41 AM
Love the patina as it helps keep the knife from reacting/staining the food...at least in my observation. Oh yeah, and I think it looks cool!

Dave Martell
07-20-2012, 02:05 AM
When I first got into this I was against patinas but then I started to see the beauty in them and let my knives turn and I've been happier for it. Less wasted time cleaning, less reaction with foods, and now I see them as functional art. Now I think pretty stainless knives looks ugly - go figure. :)

Miles
07-20-2012, 04:51 AM
Glasseye is on the mark. I really don't like patina on my yanagi, but suji and gyutou? Love it! Deba? I don't care if it has patina or looks pristine, but when I'm cutting fish for sashimi or sushi I really want a very pristine blade. Maybe it's a mental thing? Sushi should be very clean and light. Somehow using a yanagi with patina doesn't seem appropriate.

Keith Neal
07-20-2012, 11:01 AM
Thanks, guys. Perhaps I will learn. But I agree about the yanagiba. My Masamoto has been used quite a bit, mostly on tuna, and shows no signs of developing a patina.

keithsaltydog
07-20-2012, 05:15 PM
Love the patina as it helps keep the knife from reacting/staining the food...at least in my observation. Oh yeah, and I think it looks cool!

+1 you can spend alot of effort trying to clean a carbon Gyuto,just let the patina go,it's like a De Buyer carbon skillet you have to season it.

Keith you are certainly not alone most people like shiny things

Cutting Ahi(yellowfin Tuna) & sushi topping wt. a Yanagi does not have as much reactivity as many other foods.If a yanagi is used alot wt. out scrubbing it will get a very lite gray that gives the metal a depth.That's my experience anyway wt. Blue & white carbons.