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DwarvenChef
07-30-2012, 05:31 AM
My tech keeps stepping backwards...

I put this post here because I didn't know where else to place it :p

The more I get into food and cooking the more I shy away from new fangled gadgets. My crock pots sit idle, the processor sits gathering dust, and I don't know the last time I touched my pannini press. My poor Kitchen Aid gets used by my wife and daughter more than I even look at it.

Now I am looking for a classic meat grinder, the good ol cast iron buggers. I've been looking at them in antique shops but never see them with working parts. Not knowing what makers where worth looking at I have yet to purchase one. I have 2 given to me by relatives and I have gotten one to work but it is wicked small :p I use it for nuts and bacon grinding. I'd love to get a classic early model grinder.

Anyone have knowledge on these goodies? I am looking for working models, IE to use :)

Kyle
07-30-2012, 10:33 AM
I have a older Chop-Rite #22 that I got from my grandma and I think before they were called Chop-Rite they were called Enterprise. I don't know much about grinders but I think either of these brands are considered the quintessential "classic" American cast iron grinder. There were lots of other makes, but these are two of the bigger makers, kind of like Griswold or Wagner for cast iron pans. Anyways, Chop-Rite is still a company and still making grinders based on the original designs and they sell replacement parts. Meaning, if you find a vintage Chop-Rite/Enterprise grinder with missing parts you can still find new parts for it. They're very basic: grinder housing, auger, handle, grinder knife, grinder plate, and a screw on ring. Also, the sizes #12, 22, & 32 are all standardized, so you can buy made in China or whatever grinders today for under $100 that are the same size and use the same parts. I needed a stuffing plate and stuffing tube for my #22 grinder and was able to find them at Bass Pro Shop, they also had spare grinder knives that fit as well.

If you have the money and lack patience you can get a new grinder from Chop Rite http://www.chop-rite.com/Products.htm A #22 will set you back about $230, but it's worth it- American Made and still built the way they did it 75 years ago.

I've been using my Chop-Rite a lot lately. I made burgers a couple weeks back, made chow chow last week, and this weekend made a whole bunch of sausage. I bought the aforementioned parts at Bass Pro literally this past Friday. It's a little bit of work but it's a joy to use and easy to clean up. I want to buy a stainless steel table to bolt this thing down to for easy clean up and sterilization.

Dave Martell
07-30-2012, 11:20 AM
Kyle, my local hardware store has these grinders on the shelf with replacements parts and everything. I only ever glanced at them but now I'll have to check them out and see what the deal is. We have a large Amish/Menonite community here in and around town so lots of these old fashioned types of appliances are available in stores locally.

Kyle
07-30-2012, 11:36 AM
Dave, Chop-Rite makes their grinders in Pottstown, PA, so you'd be supporting a local business if you were to pick one up! They're much pricier than the Chinese/Czech/Indian made grinders that you can find at Cabelas, Bass Pro and other stores, but these grinders leak and are poorly made. If you want the real deal then Chop Rite is the way to go!

Dave Martell
07-30-2012, 05:47 PM
Dave, Chop-Rite makes their grinders in Pottstown, PA, so you'd be supporting a local business if you were to pick one up! They're much pricier than the Chinese/Czech/Indian made grinders that you can find at Cabelas, Bass Pro and other stores, but these grinders leak and are poorly made. If you want the real deal then Chop Rite is the way to go!


Good to know, thanks

DwarvenChef
07-31-2012, 02:38 AM
Will keep an eye out for that name. Thanks for the info.

I'd be looking for vintage pieces but the ability to get new parts would be a huge pluss :)

LOL been looking at vintage grinders on Ebite and I'm seeing the same names I'm used to with straight razors, Keen Kutter, Landers, Frary & Clark, and more...
If I see one made by Robison I may be in trouble :p

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Winchester-Repeating-Arms-Co-KK22-Meat-Grinder-/271024089617?pt=Vintage_Hunting&hash=item3f1a4b6a11

Dave Martell
07-31-2012, 03:14 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Winchester-Repeating-Arms-Co-KK22-Meat-Grinder-/271024089617?pt=Vintage_Hunting&hash=item3f1a4b6a11



That's actually a Gatling style meat grinder :D

Mucho Bocho
07-31-2012, 03:38 PM
Porkert is the brand to go with and this is what it can do, pending your meat is almost frozen. I think this one is a #12. I also have a 1HP #22 10 pounds minute commercial grinder too. The porkert might be hard to get these days though?

http://i1051.photobucket.com/albums/s426/dennismpintoii/groundchuck.jpg

Tristan
08-02-2012, 05:45 AM
I hate seeing those pics, I keep mentally thinking "If my hand falls in while I'm in full churn..."

SameGuy
08-02-2012, 09:10 AM
LOL! That was like me standing in the vestibule of our (long-gone) archaic commuter trains when I was a student, with the doors wide open on hot summer days: "Gosh I hope I don't suddenly jump out the door!"

Mucho Bocho
08-02-2012, 10:06 AM
tristan, or like not eating cause your afraid of biting your fingers off. The manual grinder has so many advantages than the electrics. You can utterly control the grind because its your other arm that is doing the grinding thus can immediately stop and can coordinate it with pressing the meat into the auger.

People make too much of a fuss about having to turn the handle to grind meat. come on lazy nation

SameGuy
08-02-2012, 11:00 AM
Hehehe. The one reason I probably won't get the grinder attachment for the KA is exactly the control issue. Churning ice cream by hand? That's different. My mom has an ancient manual grinder somewhere. I should dig it up.

Tristan
08-03-2012, 02:45 AM
Haha I'm not lazy to use a manual thing, nor am I saying it is any more or less dangerous than an electric grinder.

It is just the crap my brain does when presented with pictures like this. In fact, every single time I use a grater I envision shredding my hands to ribbons on the side. I still use the grater. Knives are fine though - can't quite figure out why, but heck.

Mucho Bocho
08-03-2012, 09:55 AM
Tristain, Honestly you're not crazy and i think its natural to fear/respect things that can cause us harm. especially if you have a very low threshold for pain and loss of blood. ;)

SameGuy
08-03-2012, 11:59 PM
My sister is freaked out by my knives. She doesn't even really want to go into any knife shops in Tokyo next month.

SameGuy
08-04-2012, 12:05 AM
Just found out today that mom gave away her old grinder, from Csepel Vasgyar (Csepel Iron Works, outside of Budapest). Bummer. It was about a 22 size and took anything we threw at it (in it).