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View Full Version : Advice - Steak Knife Sharpening



Talal
08-07-2012, 10:34 AM
Hi Guys :)

I own a pair of Tojiro DP steak knives (Vg-10 SS) and was wondering if anyone can assist me, with regards to stones. I would like to practice sharpening on these guys first before attempting to do my DT Gyuto. I have sharpened a chefs knife before in a class i took once and did ok at it. Ive been looking at the below file as a guide.

http://knifewear.com/img/toru-sharpening-instructions.jpg

Im assuming for the steak knives id need: 220, 1000, 2000 and then 4000? With the 8000 to be purchased at a later date for my gyuto when i perfect my technique?

Thank you all for your help and time

T :D

schanop
08-07-2012, 10:52 AM
Often do my shun vg10s with just bestor 1200, quick enough and toothy enough for the task and plate.

zitangy
08-07-2012, 11:53 AM
my main consideration
1. if they are to be used on plates which will dull the edges fast,. even if I run thru the full grit progression, it will be a few strokes on each grit so that teh edge will have an assortment of striations from the various grits.

2 The micro bevel wld be on a 2,000 grit.. as the final stone.

just my thoughts..
hv fun
d

Talal
08-07-2012, 11:54 AM
Often do my shun vg10s with just bestor 1200, quick enough and toothy enough for the task and plate.

really eh? i can get away with just that one stone for this?

ty for this tip.. and others would be appreciated as well

:D

Benuser
08-07-2012, 01:12 PM
A somewhat different approach:
You want to remove damaged steel, and you have to deburr VG-10, which is not that simple. I would choose the Choseras 800 and 2k.

Talal
08-07-2012, 10:12 PM
hmm thank you all for the input, not sure which approach to take which will be the most cost effective, i think im more confused than when i started lol

chinacats
08-07-2012, 10:21 PM
I think just start with the 1k and sharpen and remove the burr. The knives will perform fine.

Eamon Burke
08-07-2012, 10:30 PM
The most cost effective solution is to pay someone else to do it. If you want to learn how to sharpen, then I'd give the same advice I do for knives--buy one good stone, and learn to use it. Getting a bunch at once will just complicate things. As long as your knives are not damaged(I.E. chipped or badly dented), you can just get one stone to touch up by matching the factory bevel until you get confident enough to move on to different stones, angles, techniques, etc.

Since they are steak knives and you want to be able to use your stone in the future on your DT Gyuto, I'd get a JNS 1k or Bester 1200. Both are very good stones, and have their merits.

1,000 is pretty low grit, but you are sharpening steak knives, and they will benefit from a nice toothy edge. A refined edge will be ruined on a plate quickly anyways, so it's best to get something a bit more aggressive than you will use to finish and touch up your Gyuto in the future(because your Gyuto will only ever see a wooden board).

Tristan
08-07-2012, 10:46 PM
To simplify, I think you just need 1 stone, around a 1K grit. I would not worry about going further than that for a steak knife, as you will be doing constant touch ups if you are cutting on a plate.

a Chosera 1K is great stone, and tons of praise for the gesshin stone range (I've not used one). Then get a cheap strop, or use wet newspaper on a stone as the strop.

For the Gyuto, you can do 400, 1K, final finisher (5K or natural depending on what you want) to be cost effective and be 99% of the way towards the final goal. Slip a 2-3K inbetween and move up from 5K to 8K etc for preference if you want to, or feel the itch to try new things.

We have so many stones and progressions because we are nutjobs. Plus some want to achieve specific things.

Talal
08-07-2012, 11:12 PM
thank you all for this fine input, definately know where im heading now. Ill be sure to post any updates or progressions

Have a wonderful evening