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View Full Version : Have any one ever used ceramic knife? Super Cool!



naia
09-26-2012, 07:14 AM
Have any one ever tried ceramic knife before?
It is extremely handy for boneless meat. In addition, it wont brown food and is much healthier.
What do you think?

http://img04.taobaocdn.com/imgextra/i4/738313736/T2efdQXbJbXXXXXXXX_!!738313736.jpg
http://img04.taobaocdn.com/imgextra/i4/738313736/T24jqoXc0aXXXXXXXX_!!738313736.jpg

NO ChoP!
09-26-2012, 07:49 AM
I have a few in the home. I really like the Kyocera parer. Great bang for the buck at under $30. They do eventually dull, and you'll need to invest in a pricey sharpener or take the time to send it off. Also, you can't thin it or tweak it at all. These are what the wifey usually goes to....

knyfeknerd
09-26-2012, 08:38 AM
I had one I bought about 10 years ago when they first hit the market. It was a really sharp and expensive(at that time) knife, but just too fragile for serious use. I paid about $200 for one the same size as in the top picture, but now you can get them at wal-mart for 20 bucks.

EdipisReks
09-26-2012, 08:52 AM
the knives suck. they aren't sharp, chip easily, and tend to be thick. the peelers are okay, but i still prefer steel, for the same reasons.

pitonboy
09-26-2012, 09:05 AM
:headbonk:This has got to be a trol, fellas!:rolleyes:

chinacats
09-26-2012, 09:06 AM
My knives don't brown food either...and mine are carbon and capable of being sharpened! Pitonboy has to be right...troll...

cclin
09-26-2012, 09:21 AM
I brought black Kyocera Revolution Nakiri six month ago. first, I think it is cool looking & very sharp!! however, after I used Japanese steel knife! then I realize what is real meaning of "sharp":bigeek:......I never touch my ceramic Nakiri again:bye:

ThEoRy
09-26-2012, 09:27 AM
But guys, its healthier! Lol

knyfeknerd
09-26-2012, 09:47 AM
Yeah but can you leave it in the oven like a cutco?

ajhuff
09-26-2012, 10:01 AM
Yeah probably a spammers but a good question. I was wondering too.

I love ceramic peelers though. My Rösle left handed peeler arrived last night so I might changes my thinking.

-AJ

Xuster
09-26-2012, 10:06 AM
I wonder how many people here have ever worked for Vecter marketing selling cutco knives...cause I almost did. Seemed like a sweet deal when I was in high school. Luckily the parental units talked me out of it and I ended up in a kitchen instead :thumbsup: And yea, ceramic knives are awful, can't even drop them from more than a couple feet...

Sarge
09-26-2012, 10:09 AM
I sold me some Cutco for a about a month one summer. I think I sold 3 knives total to people who already owned Cutco. I still have all my cutco stuff and they aren't terrible but they aren't good. For the price you pay it is not at all worth it.

brainsausage
09-26-2012, 10:11 AM
I logged on ten minutes ago, and I've already run across two shills. Lame.

Xuster
09-26-2012, 10:18 AM
Word of the day: Shill

Urban Dictionary:
A person engaged in covert advertising. The shill attempts to spread buzz by personally endorsing the product in public forums with the pretense of sincerity, when in fact he is being paid for his services.
Who are you shilling for?

Ignore the n00b, he's just here to shill.

chinacats
09-26-2012, 10:25 AM
Word of the day: Shill

Urban Dictionary:
A person engaged in covert advertising. The shill attempts to spread buzz by personally endorsing the product in public forums with the pretense of sincerity, when in fact he is being paid for his services.
Who are you shilling for? Ignore the n00b, he's just here to shill.

Yeah, but at least introduce yourself before trying to bs people...:lol2:

ThEoRy
09-26-2012, 10:29 AM
I logged on ten minutes ago, and I've already run across two shills. Lame.

Where's the other one?

kalaeb
09-26-2012, 10:38 AM
What? I thought this was a legitimate discussion, as far as sharpening, I just drop mine and re-chip it...good as new.

JBroida
09-26-2012, 10:42 AM
Where's the other one?

in one of my threads :(

brainsausage
09-26-2012, 10:57 AM
in one of my threads :(

That one especially p'sd me off...

Eamon Burke
09-26-2012, 11:27 AM
Only used a few. Honest opinions: dull, worst geometry EVER, fragile, generally tiny. So, useless.

I'd want a parer sharper than the ceramics I have used.

Deckhand
09-26-2012, 11:32 AM
I have a Kyocera. I use it sometimes. Dishwasher friendly:D

Mucho Bocho
09-26-2012, 01:54 PM
Talk about rattling the cage. Has to be a prank. Almost laughable, no is laughable

Gravy Power
09-26-2012, 04:00 PM
Decent effort on the troll. 7.5/10

I do have a ceramic knife though. Wanted to put a bread knife in my kit so I picked up this beauty:

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/kuhn-rikon-bread-knife/?pkey=cbread-knives

You know it's got to be a gem if Williams Sonoma is pitching it for 19.95.

stevenStefano
09-26-2012, 04:19 PM
To answer the question even if it is a troll, I got a couple of ceramic knives from Ikea and they are awful. The geometry is pathetic, even if the knife were razor sharp it would still suck at cutting

Gravy Power
09-26-2012, 04:33 PM
Decent effort on the troll. 7.5/10

I do have a ceramic knife though. Wanted to put a bread knife in my kit so I picked up this beauty:

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/kuhn-rikon-bread-knife/?pkey=cbread-knives

You know it's got to be a gem if Williams Sonoma is pitching it for 19.95.

Woops. I'm an idoit. I don't own a ceramic knife.

naia
09-26-2012, 04:36 PM
Sorry, guys, if i asked sth off-topic. I just wanted to get your opinion on it. But believe it or not, I have been using myself and they are ok,especially when the price is under $30. better than wal-mart or ikea quality for sure. Maybe you judge it from chef point of view?

jayhay
09-26-2012, 04:59 PM
This is for real and not a troll? Ceramic knives are healthier?

naia
09-26-2012, 05:19 PM
This is for real and not a troll? Ceramic knives are healthier?

no metal, won't oxidize food. I believe so.

Take a look at the following

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/9341246/At-the-cutting-edge-ceramic-knives.html
http://www.myceramicknives.com/my-30-day-test/ceramic-knives-keep-apples-fresh

Mucho Bocho
09-26-2012, 06:39 PM
I have a 5 inch petty that my six year old uses, its fine for children to learn on. it has a blunt tip and quite light, easy to grip. I might actually try that chocera nakiri style as the girls want to push cut everything.

Justin0505
09-26-2012, 06:59 PM
You can apparently convex sharpen them pretty easily used black wet/dry sand paper and a mouse pad. One of the problems with ceramic is that there's no burr so you have to be very precise and consistent with your angles, but the convex technique compensates for this a bit. It also creates a stronger edge. I personally have no need / use for a ceramic kitchen knife (nor do I imagine most of the folks here do). But, I understand why there is a market for them and why, I'm sure, they sell very well at walmart.

SPA
09-27-2012, 12:06 AM
Take a look at the following

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/9341246/At-the-cutting-edge-ceramic-knives.html
http://www.myceramicknives.com/my-30-day-test/ceramic-knives-keep-apples-fresh

For under $30, a ceramic knife may not be such a bad deal. But as a long time Kyocera user, I can confidently state the £45 knife described in the Telegraph article will not perform as well as a comparably-priced Japanese steel knife. The Kyocera may indeed hold an edge for a longer period, but that edge won't be nearly as sharp.

I've been using carbon steel knives for a while now and haven't encountered the problems with corrosion that the author describes. I think it may only be a problem for cooking professionals who cut large quantities of corrosive food in a single session.

brainsausage
09-27-2012, 12:46 AM
no metal, won't oxidize food. I believe so.

Take a look at the following

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/9341246/At-the-cutting-edge-ceramic-knives.html
http://www.myceramicknives.com/my-30-day-test/ceramic-knives-keep-apples-fresh

Just cuz I like to stir things up once in awhile...

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/09/17/161295119/if-gm-apples-dont-brown-how-can-you-tell-if-theyre-rotten

K-Fed
09-27-2012, 12:00 PM
Just cuz I like to stir things up once in awhile...

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/09/17/161295119/if-gm-apples-dont-brown-how-can-you-tell-if-theyre-rotten

Good read. I'll stick with a sharp knife and acidulated water. Never had issues with browning.

mpukas
09-27-2012, 04:21 PM
Funny this topic just popped up, as I been wondering about sharpening ceramic knives - is it possible w/ water or oil stones?

I don't own one, but I've been seeing them in the media for years. Prolly the first time I saw one was on Ming Tsai's cooking show years ago. HE raved about how sharp they were. My biggest concern way back then was the knives he was using were so small. Like a 5-6" chef's knife. I was using an old Wusthof 8" chef's knife, and that was too small for me back then.

I think the biggest reason they're popular among the unwashed masses - apart from celeb endorsements - is that they are in fact sharper that what most people are used to in a kitchen knife. And they stay sharper longer than most crap steel knives found haphazardly jostling around in kitchen junk drawers along with other random utensils. Therefore, they don't need to be sharpened very often, if ever. Most happy homemakers don't even know how to steel a knife properly, let alone sharpen a knife, and most cant' even be bothered to send their knives out to a "professional" in a van with some grinding belts.

mpukas
09-27-2012, 04:43 PM
no metal, won't oxidize food. I believe so.

Take a look at the following

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/9341246/At-the-cutting-edge-ceramic-knives.html
http://www.myceramicknives.com/my-30-day-test/ceramic-knives-keep-apples-fresh

Re: the Original Troll's linked articles, the first one won't open for me.

The 2nd artcle demonstrates my point in my previous post about ceramic knives being sharper than the average in home steel knife.

In the artcle, the apple slices cut by the “$150, newly sharpened Henkels knife” (note the spelling) are browning because the knife is not sharp. We don’t know how the knife was “sharpened,” and I’m willing to bet it’s not remotely sharp. That knife is stainless and will not react to or with food. The ceramic knife is probably considerably sharper thus doing less damage to the cells during the cut. An apple cut by any non-sharp knife will have more damaged and ruptured cells rather than cleanly sliced cells, resulting in faster oxidation.

Just look at the slices in the first pic – the slice on the left has a rougher texture than the slice on the left cut by the ceramic knife. That rougher texture indicates a dull knife and will oxidize faster.

Not to say that certain metals won’t react with certain foods – we all know the stories of certain cladded knives and cabbage, etc.

Now is there any potential health hazard of metal reacting with food? Dr. Mercola (whom I’m going to label as fairly “radical” in terms of health & nutrition) advocates using ceramic cookware, because he believes that when metal is heated, it can transfer heavy metal elements to food which are toxic to ingest. He’s not alone in this belief. He does, however, say that when metal is not heated, such as a SS pan, there is no health hazard. So, one could assume that since we don’t heat our knives when we cut, there is no health hazard. Is there a health hazard when we cut a hot piece of protein, such as a roast? That’s a good question, but I assume “NO” because any hot food item being cut is no going to be hot enough (125-170d?) to compare to that of a skillet on a stove (350d+).

EdipisReks
09-27-2012, 08:45 PM
i wouldn't pee on Joseph Mercola if he were on fire and begged me to.

brainsausage
09-27-2012, 10:22 PM
Re: the Original Troll's linked articles, the first one won't open for me.

The 2nd artcle demonstrates my point in my previous post about ceramic knives being sharper than the average in home steel knife.

In the artcle, the apple slices cut by the “$150, newly sharpened Henkels knife” (note the spelling) are browning because the knife is not sharp. We don’t know how the knife was “sharpened,” and I’m willing to bet it’s not remotely sharp. That knife is stainless and will not react to or with food. The ceramic knife is probably considerably sharper thus doing less damage to the cells during the cut. An apple cut by any non-sharp knife will have more damaged and ruptured cells rather than cleanly sliced cells, resulting in faster oxidation.

Just look at the slices in the first pic – the slice on the left has a rougher texture than the slice on the left cut by the ceramic knife. That rougher texture indicates a dull knife and will oxidize faster.

Not to say that certain metals won’t react with certain foods – we all know the stories of certain cladded knives and cabbage, etc.

Now is there any potential health hazard of metal reacting with food? Dr. Mercola (whom I’m going to label as fairly “radical” in terms of health & nutrition) advocates using ceramic cookware, because he believes that when metal is heated, it can transfer heavy metal elements to food which are toxic to ingest. He’s not alone in this belief. He does, however, say that when metal is not heated, such as a SS pan, there is no health hazard. So, one could assume that since we don’t heat our knives when we cut, there is no health hazard. Is there a health hazard when we cut a hot piece of protein, such as a roast? That’s a good question, but I assume “NO” because any hot food item being cut is no going to be hot enough (125-170d?) to compare to that of a skillet on a stove (350d+).

I was thinking the exact same thing in terms of sharpness when I viewed that link.