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steeley
09-30-2012, 02:58 AM
http://i.imgur.com/Ae4c3.jpg

The above image is an 1,800 year old Roman gadget with 6 different purposes. It is made of silver with an iron blade and includes a spoon, fork, spike, spatula, toothpick, and of course, blade. The item was probably made between AD 200 and AD 300, when the Roman empire was a great imperial power. The item was found more than 20 years ago and was obtained by the Fitzwilliam Museum, in Cambridge England in 1991.

http://i.imgur.com/07QxFl.jpg
a replica with blade.

steeley
09-30-2012, 03:31 AM
Roman military cooking pots bronze 1st century.
http://i.imgur.com/5Cx8n.jpg

1300-1500 gothic germany
http://i.imgur.com/5zBdU.jpg


and donuts.
http://i.imgur.com/JGlFJl.jpg

Lucretia
09-30-2012, 05:06 AM
The Roman multi-tool is amazing, the cooking pots are beautiful, and the donut queen made me laugh. Well done, sir!

tk59
09-30-2012, 01:37 PM
Cool stuff. Thanks!

Cutty Sharp
09-30-2012, 04:30 PM
Looks like you could still cook with everything here todayl, including doughnut girl, but not the multi-tool which wouldn't scare Victorinox at all I'm afraid.

wenus2
09-30-2012, 05:20 PM
Roman leatherman, who knew?

steeley
09-30-2012, 08:28 PM
Norfolk Knife which was made by the Sheffield cutlers, Joseph Rodgers & Sons, for the 1851 Great Exhibition in London. It took two years to make, has over seventy blades, and was named in honour of the Duke of Norfolk, Lord of the Manor of Hallam. The Norfolk Knife has been exhibited all over the world, winning medals from Chile to China. The Knife is owned by Egginton Brothers, cutlery manufacturers in Sheffield, and is on loan to the Cutlers' Company.


http://i.imgur.com/5jjxk.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/8pnyLl.jpg

knyfeknerd
09-30-2012, 09:17 PM
Is that a Norfolk knife in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me???

Cutty Sharp
09-30-2012, 11:36 PM
It's nice but, to me, it's not quite versatile enough, don't you think?

Delbert Ealy
09-30-2012, 11:49 PM
Hadn't seen the roman multitool, but was aware of the norfolk knife. I have always loved them, I carry a vic and a leatherman everyday.
The roman multitool is just awesome!
Del

Lefty
10-01-2012, 05:00 AM
Amazing, as always, Steeley!

That multi-tool really makes you think. What amazes me is that even then, they still "pretty it up" with the detailing. Same goes for the bronze pots. The handles amazed me, but not quite as much as the precision and skill of the whole piece!

This thread just made me excited to use my SAK, today, at work.

JasonD
10-02-2012, 06:26 PM
Actually the detailing was what struck me most as well. I figured cooking pots for the military would be pretty rudimentary and unadorned, if not still very sturdy. But they are beautiful. Also that multi-tool is pretty interesting, though I can't imagine using it would be very convenient.

Eamon Burke
10-03-2012, 12:53 AM
I need to find someone to make me a pair of scifsars.

steeley
10-03-2012, 04:53 AM
During the 1st century in roman they had sharpening bench's in the market .
http://i.imgur.com/4nJBGl.jpg

grinding stone and stones
http://i.imgur.com/cajFGl.jpg

and to sharpen there flint knap knives.
http://i.imgur.com/R2KJcl.jpg

steeley
10-03-2012, 04:56 AM
And a few bronze daggers with gold inlay.
http://i.imgur.com/IZT04l.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/DC2C8l.jpg

axe

http://i.imgur.com/fAOJMl.jpg

steeley
10-03-2012, 05:01 AM
I thought this ring was rather nice it show's a metal smith working on a helmet in 220 BC.
http://i.imgur.com/zcTKEl.jpg