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joec
10-10-2012, 03:04 PM
Ok, I wasn't sure where to post this as I'm getting into hunting after 40 years from my last deer taken. At that time my brother field cleaned it and I finished the butchering at home myself. Well I plan on doing some deer hunting this year and have a skinning knife made by Schrade called the Old Timer. Now the steel is I think marked 1520 T or that is the only mark on the blade which I assume is the steel type. Well as it came it had a fair edge but not one I would use and what grit would you consider taking up too when sharpening. I have the ability with my water stones to go from 250 all the way to 10,000 and beyond with my strops. I do understand this isn't going to be a kitchen knife however I take my butcher knives to about 4000 rarely more. Any suggestions would be appreciated or tips on the best edge for field cleaning game.

DeepCSweede
10-10-2012, 04:09 PM
I jump from 1000 to the 5000 rika and stop there. For my smaller folders, I used to use the lansky sharpener to the fine grit, but now I take them to an old Arkansas stone that has been in the family for at least 60 years that I would guess would be in the 3000 range.

DeepCSweede
10-10-2012, 04:10 PM
Oh and congrats on getting into deer hunting again and good luck.

joec
10-10-2012, 07:07 PM
I've got Shapton Glass stones in 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 as well as a Naniwa 10K. For strops I have cow hide with CO, horse hide with Diamond sprays in two levels (all bought through Dave or Hand America. I also have a Smith's diamond field stones in 325 and 750 grit diamond plates as shown below.

http://www.smithsproducts.com/products/product.asp?id=24&cid=10

At any rate I will take it to 4K and see if that holds up, if not then 8K. Oh and I choose my stones based on micron size where possible always trying to get as close to possible by dividing by 2 from course to fine.

Oh and thanks for the good luck. I might just need it since it is also the first time hunting any game with a rifle but did as last time with a shot gun and slugs. Now I have a 45-70 Rossi Rio Grande with a Bushnell Banner Dusk to Dawn 1.5-4.5x32mm scope.

kalaeb
10-10-2012, 07:21 PM
I don't hunt, but I can't imagine you would take it past what you would on a slicer. I would go up to your 4, then just a few passes on the 8k and call it good.

DeepCSweede
10-10-2012, 07:23 PM
Nice - We hunt in a lot of woods with a range that generally is no more than 100 yards, so my main rifle is a 1939 .300 Savage Model 99 lever action with peep sights. If I sit on the field at dusk, I usually run with a Ruger Mark II 7x57mm Mauser bolt action with a Leupold 2x-12x scope. My family swears by the Savage Model 99 for woods hunting - great balance and an absolutely classic action.

PierreRodrigue
10-10-2012, 09:08 PM
For a field dressing knife, gutting and skinning, a little tooth is nice call it micro serrations. I use a worn out 400 grit belt on my grinder, then a quick buff with some green compound. It cuts better/longer in hot protein then a polished edge. Especially on a lesser steel than what most kitchen users expect. By the way, I have the same knife. its a back up now should I loose or should I say misplace my CPM S30V hunter.

Pensacola Tiger
10-10-2012, 09:18 PM
A search turned up this page on the Schrade website about your knife:

http://www.schrade-knives.com/OldTimer152OT.html

It look as if the marking on the blade isn't the steel, but rather the model. The steel, according to the webpage is 7Cr17 stainless.

Rick

daveb
10-10-2012, 10:32 PM
A friend describes his 45-70 as throwing logs at em. It works.

I'm also in the less is more camp for edge on a deer knife. By design the knife will have a more robust edge. For the variety of tasks that it may perform thats a good thing. Your Smith plates, orange and yellow, are all you need imho. Maybe an XF or 1-2 K stone if you must.

Have a good trip and "Doe meat is better than no meat".

Regards,

Dave

Dave Martell
10-11-2012, 02:05 AM
I've got some great feedback on deer skinning edges over the last few years since I've been sharpening all sorts of knives for a local hunting lodge. The ticket seems to be (as usual) that the cheaper the knife the coarser the edge is the way to go. I find that it's best to go 120x belt and then one pass on each side on my deburring wheel. If I do more than one pass per side the edge becomes too polished. One of the guys uses a ceramic rod to touch up if he does more than one deer. I've never done this myself but I was shocked to hear that my edges (on cheap Schrades & Dexters, etc) make it through a whole deer now, they were too at first but now they're jaded and expect it. :D

Anyway, if I were using stones I'd go no further than 1k but I think 220x is more in order for what's needed on a cheap knife. Deburr with a ceramic rod - leave the teeth on the edge.

joec
10-11-2012, 01:17 PM
A search turned up this page on the Schrade website about your knife:

http://www.schrade-knives.com/OldTimer152OT.html

It look as if the marking on the blade isn't the steel, but rather the model. The steel, according to the webpage is 7Cr17 stainless.

Rick

Thanks Rick and didn't know what the 1520T on the blade stood for since it doesn't say stainless or anything else other than US made below the Schrade on mine. I paid $13.90 from walmart and also picked up the Schrade gut hook knife as well as a bone saw. Both knives where the same price but the saw was $20 and made by another maker.

I did sharpen it and got a pretty good edge taking it from 1000 to 4000 with my glass stones followed by the Chromium Oxide strop. Now I will have to see how well in holds up in actual use. I still have the course and fine diamond stones that I will also have if needed. I tried it on an Outdoor Life folder and it really put a good edge on it also.

joec
10-11-2012, 01:33 PM
I've got some great feedback on deer skinning edges over the last few years since I've been sharpening all sorts of knives for a local hunting lodge. The ticket seems to be (as usual) that the cheaper the knife the coarser the edge is the way to go. I find that it's best to go 120x belt and then one pass on each side on my deburring wheel. If I do more than one pass per side the edge becomes too polished. One of the guys uses a ceramic rod to touch up if he does more than one deer. I've never done this myself but I was shocked to hear that my edges (on cheap Schrades & Dexters, etc) make it through a whole deer now, they were too at first but now they're jaded and expect it. :D

Anyway, if I were using stones I'd go no further than 1k but I think 220x is more in order for what's needed on a cheap knife. Deburr with a ceramic rod - leave the teeth on the edge.

Thanks Dave that is what I had been told also hence the selection of knives I made. Never thought of using the ceramic rod though as I deburred with the felt blocks I got from you. The fit great in my bag.

Oh and for those that are curious and don't know much about a 45-70 Government it was developed in 1873 by Springfield for the Army at the time. It was a replacement for the 50-70 Sharps. It is a 45 caliber .458 dia, 70mm of powder and used a 405 grain bullet. Now they make bullets from 250 to 550 grains and depending on powder, bullet can take down every creature that walks the planet. It was replaced by the 30-06 around 1903. The 45-70 was also the round used in the Gatling guns eventually. All I can say with hard lead RNFP 405 gr bullets loaded with a good powder it is a thumper and you can eat right up to the wound as it goess completely through a pig, deer or bear.

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