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SameGuy
10-29-2012, 08:25 PM
My 12" Calphalon Commercial Non-Stick omelet pan is starting to not be non-stick, and I warped the bottom ever so slightly early on while cooking on an ancient coil-top stove. I'm looking for a new non-stick frying pan, preferably one of the newer, ceramic- or titanium-based (non-PTFE) options.

I would love one of the fancy, expensive French pans, or even an All Clad NS, but money *is* an object in this decision. I like my Meyer Circulon Infinite pasta pot, and have decided that an anodized pan with encapsulated base might be good to have, so I'm considering the Circulon 10 and 12-inch pans.

Today I saw a pair of "Green Pan" frying pans at Costco. They seem lighter and thinner overall than my Calphalon. But the pair is about $35 plus tax. Are they any good?

mr drinky
10-29-2012, 10:15 PM
I have a small one that I haven't tried that much (Beka), but from what I understand they will eventually lose some of their non-stick properties. A lot of them recommend cooking on lower heats (medium at most) to preserve their non-stick function. With that said, I saw some celebrity chefs abusing them during a housewares show, and they looked pretty impressive. They just might not last as long as you think.

k.

daveb
10-30-2012, 01:47 AM
I've had occasion to use the "Green" pans sold by Cuisinart a few times. Don't like them. A lot. Food sticks and burns way to easy. PIA to clean. Hard to describe adequately on a family forum. Suggest drop the coin on Swiss Diamond - all they do is NS and they do it well.

Regards,

Dave

apicius9
10-30-2012, 04:24 AM
Never tried the green pans, but I have a Swiss Diamond and that seems to be the best non-stick I have had so far.I will probably buy another if/when mine dies eventually.

Stefan

DeepCSweede
10-30-2012, 12:38 PM
Seems like the research on anondized pans is showing them to be safe enough (for now). I still have a couple of circulon that I use. I would probably stick with that again if I were to go non-stick.

dreamwrx
10-30-2012, 12:58 PM
The Swiss Diamonds were the best rated by Consumer Reports testing... but they are quite the expense.

EarthPan, GreenPan, and Starfrit has a few non PFOA pans. However they (Consumer Reports) said most show non to minimal PFOA after cooking, heating, scrubbing.

Emeril non sticks rated better cooking performance (not as good as the swiss diamonds) but doesn't cost a fortune. just passing on data.

cnochef
10-30-2012, 01:11 PM
I just did a whack of research as I'm replacing my crappy Green Pans. Decided on Le Creuset hard anodized pans. They are pricey but not ridiculously so, guaranteed for 10 years.

Another plus is that they are induction compatible, unlike Swiss Diamond or most other hard anodized pans.

http://www.chefsresource.com/le-creuset-annodized-cookware.html

EdipisReks
10-30-2012, 01:13 PM
the scanpan non-stick is pretty good, and there are some somewhat reasonably priced ones available.

SameGuy
10-30-2012, 04:16 PM
The key is -- as I've slowly discovered -- there is no long-term non-stick solution. Most pans, even expensive ones, don't release very well after a surprisingly short period of time. Even the president of the Cookware Manufacturers Association advises that the best-quality NS will no longer be non-stick after a year or 18 months of normal home use. What's the point of spending $150 or more on a NS pan if the pan's main properties vanish in the same amount of time as a $40 pan's?

GlassEye
10-30-2012, 06:14 PM
The key is -- as I've slowly discovered -- there is no long-term non-stick solution. Most pans, even expensive ones, don't release very well after a surprisingly short period of time. Even the president of the Cookware Manufacturers Association advises that the best-quality NS will no longer be non-stick after a year or 18 months of normal home use. What's the point of spending $150 or more on a NS pan if the pan's main properties vanish in the same amount of time as a $40 pan's?
Whereas carbon steel and cast-iron only get better with time.

DeepCSweede
10-30-2012, 06:20 PM
Whereas carbon steel and cast-iron only get better with time.

:plus1:

eaglerock
10-31-2012, 04:30 PM
the scanpan non-stick is pretty good, and there are some somewhat reasonably priced ones available.

My scanpan non-stick that costed 120$ only lasted 6 months even i really baby it :/

eaglerock
10-31-2012, 04:31 PM
Yes now i have 5 Cast iron and 1 cheap Tefal only for eggs :D

EdipisReks
10-31-2012, 04:35 PM
i use seasoned carbon steel for eggs, personally.

GlassEye
10-31-2012, 04:44 PM
i use seasoned carbon steel for eggs, personally.

As do I, works just fine.

mainaman
10-31-2012, 04:49 PM
you have cheap options such as cast iron or black steel carbon pans.
The black steel ones are cheap but thin, however they work well, I have used mine for almost two years now and have no complaints.
I also have DeByer and Lodge cast Iron but for small quick stuff I prefer my black steel one as it is much lighter.

Mike9
10-31-2012, 05:07 PM
I hate NS pans - they never work as advertised for me. My #1 is a heavy aluminum commercial 12" pan - I love that thing.