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ajhuff
11-01-2012, 10:20 PM
What is the problem or concern with micro-chipping? Or is there one? I have a knife that seems to exhibit it now on a somewhat routine basis. But it seems like strictly a cosmetic issue to me. I cannot ascertain any difference in performance.

-AJ

Salty dog
11-02-2012, 06:48 AM
Pull it through a piece of paper. Depending on what you are cutting (mostly when slicing rather than chopping) I believe there is a difference.

Lefty
11-02-2012, 09:22 AM
Ego? :)

I agree with Salty.

ajhuff
11-02-2012, 03:29 PM
Well sure. But I am not seeing a.difference. with onions, carrots, peppers, sandwiches, tomatoes, etc.

-AJ

Crothcipt
11-02-2012, 06:41 PM
I think the biggest thing is that micro can become bigger problems as you go. also you may get some metal in the food you're eating.

mikemac
11-03-2012, 11:55 AM
To me routine micro chipping suggests either improper cutting technique, wrong blade for the job or too acute of a sharpening angle, and around these forums, I'd go with the latter. The result of routine micro chipping is that you will routinely have to 'grind' away more metal than normal (necessary ??) when you remove this chips, which you will have to do at some point. When I've had chippiness due to sharpening angle, simply backing off by 3 degrees per side and maybe adding a micro bevel solved the problem....and really I didn't see any difference in cutting performance.

chinacats
11-03-2012, 12:47 PM
To me routine micro chipping suggests either improper cutting technique, wrong blade for the job or too acute of a sharpening angle, and around these forums, I'd go with the latter.
:lol2:


When I've had chippiness due to sharpening angle, simply backing off by 3 degrees per side and maybe adding a micro bevel solved the problem....and really I didn't see any difference in cutting performance.
+1

Marko Tsourkan
11-03-2012, 01:09 PM
To me micro-chipping is an indication of an over-hardened blade. You can correct this problem with a
microbevel, but the fact remains that the blade doesn't have an optimal HT (balanced sharpness/toughness/hardness). A choice of steel matters as well.

Lefty
11-03-2012, 01:26 PM
Yeah, there are a whole bunch of possibilities, but if you can't knock a handle off and temper it down and refinish it, the best option is microbevel, until you have to sharpen again. At that point, go less acute. You know this, I'm sure, from your posts, but it's a good little thing to toss out there anyways.

I think you were asking kore about performance differences and I'd say it's just less smooth slicing, and possible issues of "micro" becoming "macro".

stevenStefano
11-03-2012, 01:27 PM
It happens with most of my knives but I see it as just wear and tear. I sorta see it as an illustration of me being near to the knife's max performance. It is easy to do, could be a bit of dirt in a scallion or a leek, and the crappy plastic boards we use in work aren't great for the knives in the first place. Considering how much I use my knives it doesn't bother me too much. They come out easily with sharpening

bieniek
11-03-2012, 04:39 PM
To me micro-chipping is an indication of an over-hardened blade. You can correct this problem with a
microbevel, but the fact remains that the blade doesn't have an optimal HT (balanced sharpness/toughness/hardness). A choice of steel matters as well.

I have a Shigefusa knife, which happens to be the kasumi edition [which supposedly is not the chippiest they produce], and it is chipped and microchipped.

Same with Kato and Ittetsu. All of them seem not to really like fresh bread.

Guess they do something wrong.

Or they have just different purpose in their knifemaking then pleasing everyone around.


I dont mind eating some of the steel off of the knife the doctor told me long time ago i need some iron.

jayhay
11-03-2012, 05:17 PM
Or stop buying Shuns. That's a LOL. Thought I'd try to be the first one to the punch :lol2:

Cutty Sharp
11-04-2012, 04:22 AM
I have a Shigefusa knife, which happens to be the kasumi edition [which supposedly is not the chippiest they produce], and it is chipped and microchipped.

Same with Kato and Ittetsu. All of them seem not to really like fresh bread.

Guess they do something wrong.

Or they have just different purpose in their knifemaking then pleasing everyone around.


I dont mind eating some of the steel off of the knife the doctor told me long time ago i need some iron.

Bieniek, you're always defending the knifemakers!

;) I tend to agree with you.

RRLOVER
11-04-2012, 08:13 AM
When I've had chippiness due to sharpening angle, simply backing off by 3 degrees per side and maybe adding a micro bevel solved the problem....and really I didn't see any difference in cutting performance.

I feel this is a problem with knifenuts,to steep angles.I used to be guilty of this but have seen the light.Acute angle/over sharpening lends to a weak edge although sharper it will degrade faster which will make you sharpen more often.A blade has "X" amount of sharpening before the geometry will change.

keithsaltydog
11-04-2012, 12:32 PM
I have noticed that cheap carbon chinese cleavers are more prone to chipping than my expensive Gyuto.Yeh I have been guilty of putting super thin edges on my Masa's.It changes the geometry of the blade over time as well.I blend a final bevel on just about everything now.

Few yrs. ago bought a Japan small cleaver 79.00 not cheap,that thing micro chipped alot.I was surprized,figured it had to be the steel.

Benuser
11-07-2012, 07:04 PM
I'm wondering is all this chipping related to brand new knives, as often described, or does it occur any further, unless you change geometry?

keithsaltydog
11-09-2012, 04:30 PM
I'm wondering is all this chipping related to brand new knives, as often described, or does it occur any further, unless you change geometry?

Benuser I have wondered the same,I pulled mentioned cleaver out of storage,put a about 10% backbevel & went double to 20% on final bevel,both sides.I'm going to make chili tonight,chopping garlic,onions,peppers,tomato's,using this cleaver,see how the edge holds up.

EdipisReks
11-09-2012, 04:41 PM
I have a Shigefusa knife, which happens to be the kasumi edition [which supposedly is not the chippiest they produce], and it is chipped and microchipped.

Same with Kato and Ittetsu. All of them seem not to really like fresh bread.

Guess they do something wrong.

Or they have just different purpose in their knifemaking then pleasing everyone around.


I dont mind eating some of the steel off of the knife the doctor told me long time ago i need some iron.

funny enough, the only time i've ever regularly had micro-chipping was when i used my gyutos on my crusty French breads.

chinacats
11-09-2012, 05:09 PM
funny enough, the only time i've ever regularly had micro-chipping was when i used my gyutos on my crusty French breads.

That's because you are supposed to use a French chef's (Sab) on your French bread. :happymug:

Benuser
11-09-2012, 05:21 PM
That's because you are supposed to use a French chef's (Sab) on your French bread. :happymug:
You are supposed to use a - French, Swiss or other - bread knife on crusty bread.

EdipisReks
11-09-2012, 05:42 PM
That's because you are supposed to use a French chef's (Sab) on your French bread. :happymug:

and true enough, my Nogent and my K-sab don't micro-chip on fresh baguettes. :)

Benuser
11-09-2012, 06:38 PM
and true enough, my Nogent and my K-sab don't micro-chip on fresh baguettes. :)
I guess you won't find any chipping but just some other damage.

EdipisReks
11-09-2012, 06:47 PM
I guess you won't find any chipping but just some other damage.

well edges turn when you look at them, but that's not the point. :)