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toyopl
11-05-2012, 07:32 PM
My and my wife are still young (under 30s) and we bought a new house to finally move out of my parents house, and of course this means we have to invest in everything including knives :)

I had my eye on Tojiro DP series, wanted a 8'' chef, pairing knife, utility knife and a bread slicer sometime after if I like the knives.
However I just recently found this forum and quick search came up with lots of replies about quality of the knife going gown and that they're prone to chipping, this worries me a bit.
Looking at online retailer, the 3pc set is $140 which I think is great price, but if I have to watch out how I cut, to not chip the the knife on chicken bone, I'd rather bump the budget up to a $300 and get a better quality.
I'm new to cooking, I love it, but as you can imagine I can't stretch my wing in my fathers kitchen :)
I'd prefer western handle, stainless steel or anything that wouldn't make me worry about rusting.
My father has 8'' Wusthof Classic Slicer that I enjoy cutting with, no proper Chef knife in this kitchen :)
Could use some help.

James
11-05-2012, 07:47 PM
Congrats on the new house and welcome to the forum!

So let's get this started. A few more questions first - do you know how to sharpen? what kind of cutting motion do you use(push cut, rock, chop)? what kind of cutting board do you have?

toyopl
11-05-2012, 08:04 PM
Thank you,

I have never sharpened a knife in my life, nor do I know how to cut properly.
I recently started getting more into cooking and cutting, and I moved from pointing grip :) to a pinch grip, it actually feels pretty comfortable and I think I have more control with pinch grip.
No cutting board either, will have to invest in one after we move.

sachem allison
11-06-2012, 12:31 AM
welcome!

mc2442
11-06-2012, 01:13 AM
Welcome and congrats on the new house!

mainaman
11-06-2012, 01:22 AM
Welcome to the forum.
I just want to make a remark about the chipping issue you are talking about.
That comes from improper use of the knife mainly, for example you can't chop bones with a guyto.
I hope you are not coming with expectations of knives being tools that do not need any care, and that they will just work on their own. If that is the case you will be disappointed, if you are however into sharpening and cutting stuff , and like sharp edges then you are going to enjoy some high quality knives, like the rest of us.

Chuckles
11-06-2012, 02:12 AM
I have been thinking this would be a good first knife to try: Tojiro DP Damascus 180mm Gyuto. It is short enough to fill the Chef knife and utility knife roles. It is also inexpensive. I would try something like this and get an idea for what your preferences are. Save the money from more knives and get a cutting board and a decent saute pan. And welcome!

Deckhand
11-06-2012, 02:29 AM
Welcome! Get a boardsmith board a gyuto 210-240mm and a tojiro itk bread knife.

EdipisReks
11-06-2012, 02:37 AM
just buy Victorinox knives, and a decent wood board. really. unless you want to be like us. which you don't. because it would make the knives more expensive.

James
11-06-2012, 04:01 AM
just buy Victorinox knives, and a decent wood board. really. unless you want to be like us. which you don't. because it would make the knives more expensive.

not just the knives, but everything that comes with maintaining them. I'm sure that the majority of us have at least $200 in sharpening equipment. anyways, I would agree with the posters above in that you'll want a nice end grain board (maple or similar), a gyuto, tojiro ITK bread knife, and maybe a cheap victorinox paring.

To keep the gyuto and paring sharp, you'll want to have some whetstones and something with which you can flatten them. For flattening, the DMT XXC would work great. For stones, I would go with either a king 1k/6k or a bester 1200 and a suehiro rika 5000. Let's estimate the cost of these to run from $120-180 depending on whether you get the combination stone or the bester and suehiro.

There are several really good gyuto options for beginners - the artifex from chef knives to go, fujiwara fkm, the aforementioned tojiro, hiromoto g3, and akifusa. Each has its strengths and weaknesses. These knives range in cost from $70 to $200.

Assuming you get the cheapest of the gyutos (the artifex), you'll still be paying for the sharpening equipment ($120), the tojiro ITK ($65), a victorinox paring ($5), artifex ($70) which comes out to be a whopping $260 and you'll still have to get the board which can run another $80-100.

If the price scares you a bit, get away from here as quickly as you can before you are afflicted with our addiction:tease:. There's nothing wrong with getting a nice wooden board, a kingstone and a set of victorinox knvies. If you learn to keep them sharp and maintain them, you'll have better knives than 90% of people out there.

heldentenor
11-06-2012, 11:05 AM
As usual, we will overwhelm our new member with choices; that said, let me put in a good word for Togiharu. I'm playing with the Korin passaround, which is a G1, but the Inox line (stainless) at 210mm is only $120. For that price, Togiharu does very well in performance, fit and finish, profile, geometry, and balance.

EdipisReks
11-06-2012, 12:57 PM
not just the knives, but everything that comes with maintaining them. I'm sure that the majority of us have at least $200 in sharpening equipment. anyways, I would agree with the posters above in that you'll want a nice end grain board (maple or similar), a gyuto, tojiro ITK bread knife, and maybe a cheap victorinox paring.

To keep the gyuto and paring sharp, you'll want to have some whetstones and something with which you can flatten them. For flattening, the DMT XXC would work great. For stones, I would go with either a king 1k/6k or a bester 1200 and a suehiro rika 5000. Let's estimate the cost of these to run from $120-180 depending on whether you get the combination stone or the bester and suehiro.

There are several really good gyuto options for beginners - the artifex from chef knives to go, fujiwara fkm, the aforementioned tojiro, hiromoto g3, and akifusa. Each has its strengths and weaknesses. These knives range in cost from $70 to $200.

Assuming you get the cheapest of the gyutos (the artifex), you'll still be paying for the sharpening equipment ($120), the tojiro ITK ($65), a victorinox paring ($5), artifex ($70) which comes out to be a whopping $260 and you'll still have to get the board which can run another $80-100.

If the price scares you a bit, get away from here as quickly as you can before you are afflicted with our addiction:tease:. There's nothing wrong with getting a nice wooden board, a kingstone and a set of victorinox knvies. If you learn to keep them sharp and maintain them, you'll have better knives than 90% of people out there.

a king combo is a good idea.

heirkb
11-06-2012, 01:04 PM
As mainaman said, nicer knives actually require more care and skill. If I were you, I'd get a 210mm gyuto, a petty or paring knife (the difference is that paring knives are usually below 100mm), a Tojiro ITK bread knife.

You may want a honesuki if you cut a lot of chickens/things with bones. You can cut around bones with a petty or paring knife (which are also great for silverskin, ballotine, etc.), but for a knife that can take abuse, you want a tough honesuki. If you contact Jon at Japanese Knife Imports, he has one that I really like that's not listed on his site. It's $65 or so. I love mine for anything where I would feel nervous using a more delicate knife.

You have good recommendations for the gyuto, petty, and bread knife (get the Tojior ITK at Chef Knives To Go or at Cutlery and More, which I think is cheaper by just a few bucks). I'd go cheap if I were you and didn't want to turn this into a full blown hobby. As James said, you'll need a flattening plate for when your stones wear down from sharpening. Jon at JKI sells one. There's the DMT XXC. Or the Atoma 140 grit plate. I think I'd go with Jon's because of price and because I typically trust Jon when it comes to knife related things.

bikehunter
11-06-2012, 03:11 PM
welcome!

ayeung74
11-06-2012, 04:55 PM
The 210 Artifex is on my wish list too!!

toyopl
11-06-2012, 08:19 PM
OK, my brain is steaming from information from you guys and from what I've been reading in the meantime.

So here's some more info, I like Tojiro Dp series, because you can match everything in that set, yes, I know I shouldn't say it, but matching the look is important to me, and I see that Fujiwara FKM doesn't offer pairing knife or Bread knife.
Also from reading here it seems that if I don't take Tojiro to hard things or glass cutting board then I should be fine with chipping issue ?
Maybe I would try the waterstone sharpening, I'm watching tutorials on chef knife to go website and it seems that if I would get a hang of it than I could get some decent results :)

may I ask one more question ?
How would the german knives like Wusthof Classic or Henckel Pro S compare to Tojiro DP series ?

EdipisReks
11-06-2012, 08:29 PM
the Tojiro is a Subaru WRX STI to the Wusthof Ford Ranger.

Paradox
11-06-2012, 08:53 PM
I agree the Tojiro is a great step up from the German stuff. But be prepared to outgrow it quickly. I had Wusthof Gran Prix and Henckel 4 Star stuff for years until I jumped into the j-knife rabbit hole. I got a Tojiro Nakiri and 240 Gyuto and it was all over for me. That said, now I am to the point that I am going to sell the Tojiros because it's time to upgrade. Since the Tojiros I have picked up an Artifex and a Miyabi 7000 MC, wow another order of magnitude up from the Tojiros for me and I have another awesome knife on it's way to me as we speak. (Thanks Dave!) :cool2:

chinacats
11-06-2012, 10:16 PM
Maybe I would try the waterstone sharpening, I'm watching tutorials on chef knife to go website and it seems that if I would get a hang of it than I could get some decent results :)


I think you may get better results by watching the videos on Jon's site...JKI.
:2cents:

AFKitchenknivesguy
11-07-2012, 12:14 AM
Welcome and keep an eye on the for sale forum, you can probably get a good deal from someone who knows how to maintain a knife (aka a member here).

heirkb
11-07-2012, 12:20 AM
It's up to you at the end of the day, but even within one series, different knife styles have different types of handles. Look at the bread knife Kanji and handle vs. the gyuto. Slightly different. Or their handles. So if you just get western handled knives, they'll look as much like a set as getting three Fujiwaras or three Tojiros. Anyways, up to you at the end of the day. The Tojiros seem well liked and the honesuki from that line is also well liked, so you could pick that up too if you do a lot of heavy/tough work (cutting through bones, etc.)

keithsaltydog
11-07-2012, 06:18 PM
Alot of good info. on knives here & stones.Wooden boards are best for home use.I Use a 14x20"for veg. & fruits.A smaller 17x13" for protiens.Both boards are thin& lite not end grain.Got the larger Bamboo at Ross over 5 yrs. ago paid under 20.00.Still going strong after daily use has not warped.The smaller one is very lite wood fr. Japan got it at Japanese department store here,been using it over 3 yrs.

I like to wash my boards after use,a lite board is much easier to handle than a heavy end grain board.I put my boards out in the sun to dry.

Alot of knifenuts are aware of the fine edges on their blades & like endgrain as the best cutting board.They are more expensive & heavy a tradeoff.

Dave Martell
11-07-2012, 06:37 PM
I would buy Tojiro or any Japanese made knife anyday - all day over any Lamson made Artifex knife. There's more to making a knife correctly than stamping them out to look the part. I'm stating this based on how many re-works of these knives I've been doing in their short history vs how many reworks I've done on new Japanese knives in all the years I've been working on them. The American companies/makers have a LOT to learn still. I say spend your money wisely on proven performance.




Edit - No moritaka though :D

Benuser
11-07-2012, 06:42 PM
I would buy Tojiro or any Japanese made knife anyday - all day over any Lamson made Artifex knife. There's more to making a knife correctly than stamping them out to look the part. I'm stating this based on how many re-works of these knives I've been doing in their short history vs how many reworks I've done on new Japanese knives in all the years I've been working on them. The American companies/makers have a LOT to learn still. I say spend your money wisely on proven performance.
What do you have seen, Dave?

James
11-07-2012, 07:05 PM
I'm curious about artifex problems as well. Anything major?

Dave Martell
11-07-2012, 07:20 PM
It's not a specific Artifex problem, it's a problem for all of the knives made by that maker. They've all got whacky profiles (made by machine and not tweaked by hand), they're thicker than need be, and fit and finish is no better than the cheapest Japanese variants.

And before someone accuses me of hating on a certain retailer here (well OK - I do hate them) but this isn't about that since they too sell (the comparable) low end Tojiro (and other Japanese) brands as well.

Dave Martell
11-07-2012, 07:23 PM
Oh and while I'm typing - do NOT go for their "finish sharpening" unless you're looking for a project to "finish" yourself. Pick anyone here and send it to them over accepting what their on staffers can do. I'm talking bad - REAL bad.

toyopl
11-07-2012, 07:43 PM
Ok, thank you all for the help.
I think I'm gonna stick with Tojiro DP series and give it a try.
I searched this forum, and what I see constantly reccomended to newbies as far as sharpening is Bester 1200, Suehiro Rika 5000 and DMT XXC.
So I think I'm gonna order the sharpening combo above, unless someone would have different thought.

keithsaltydog
11-07-2012, 09:07 PM
Toyopl,All good choices,esp. the sharpening setup.With it all you need is some freehand skills.I recomm.Dave Martell's(The Art Of Knife Sharpening Basics)DVD.

mmingio2
11-08-2012, 12:00 PM
I have no allegiances here but I will confirm that the 'finish sharpening' was not worth it. I bought a couple as gifts for family given the price and the steel. I had them finish sharpened to save myself some time--money wasted--My Edge Pro with Choseras puts an infinitely better edge than the one they arrived with. I do like the steel once it's properly sharpened (I know, jigs are for woosies) as it's stayed sharp with minimal maintainence for quite a while.

Just my $.02



Oh and while I'm typing - do NOT go for their "finish sharpening" unless you're looking for a project to "finish" yourself. Pick anyone here and send it to them over accepting what their on staffers can do. I'm talking bad - REAL bad.

Jmadams13
11-08-2012, 03:42 PM
I'm gonna recommend something different, especially since you mentioned matching sets. Take a look thebestthings.com and check out the Sabs. They have nice stainless options, as well as carbon. Great knives with a good reputation (the elephant ones at least.) many here don't like the finger guards, but if your open to the option, they are worth a look. I'm surprised many here don't recommend them more. It's hard I go someone who uses one of their chefs that doesn't love it. I love mine(9",) and has become my goto line knife after my cleaver

chinacats
11-08-2012, 04:34 PM
I'm gonna recommend something different, especially since you mentioned matching sets. Take a look thebestthings.com and check out the Sabs. They have nice stainless options, as well as carbon. Great knives with a good reputation (the elephant ones at least.) many here don't like the finger guards, but if your open to the option, they are worth a look. I'm surprised many here don't recommend them more. It's hard I go someone who uses one of their chefs that doesn't love it. I love mine(9",) and has become my goto line knife after my cleaver

I love the nogent line myself, though kfed just posted in another thread about a change in geometry for the chef knife...stainless will have the same profile, but they are not necessarily known for having a very good stainless steel.

Jmadams13
11-08-2012, 04:37 PM
Their stainless isn't he best, but their carbon knives are great.

@OP, maybe I missed the comment or not, but are you set on stainless?

Benuser
11-08-2012, 04:40 PM
I love the nogent line myself, though kfed just posted in another thread about a change in geometry for the chef knife...stainless will have the same profile, but they are not necessarily known for having a very good stainless steel.

About the stainless: that's a very nice way to put it. French public is used to steel a lot. The steel is soft, very soft.

franzb69
11-09-2012, 05:04 AM
is getting the artifex really that bad?

Lefty
11-09-2012, 06:00 AM
I also like the recommendations here, but I'd sooner get the Fujiwaras from JCK. you could then get (I'm going to say it) the Artifex parer, which I have considered ordering, purely out of curiosity. They come in CPM154 and S35VN, and both are great steels when HT'd properly. I'm not sure what their HT is like on these, but on a paring knife, you don't need to worry quite as much and I think even a decent to good HT would produce good results for a parer. Plus, I like the size and profile.

If you have a Lee Valley nearby, they have the king 1/6k combo stone for cheap, and then you pair that with a Fuji Gyuto, Artifex parer, and ITK bread knife (I never use a bread knife, but hey...), and you're good to go!

Dave Martell
11-09-2012, 10:21 AM
is getting the artifex really that bad?

No, they're not "that bad", but like other cheaper priced knives they need work to make them "that good".

Good steel (alone) ≠ Good Knife

franzb69
11-10-2012, 01:10 AM
got it. thanks dave.

ChiliPepper
11-10-2012, 06:34 AM
Well, I'll add my two cents about the bread knife: I honestly still struggle to understand why someone on a limited budget would invest a lot of money on one of those.they will probably never see a stone (unless you really are pervert :P ) so just get a victorinox for 30ish bucks, it will serve magnificently and when it will get dull (many years in a home enviro) just get another one! :)

dharperino
11-13-2012, 03:23 PM
My two cents. I love my Tojiro bread knife but I see ChiliPepper's point. There are some good offset bread knives for cheap and unless you use that knife a lot it should last a long time, or at least until you catch the knife addiction...

from a Lurker Extraordinaire

toyopl
11-13-2012, 07:20 PM
I want to grab Tojiro DP bread knife because we eat a lot of bread at our house and I also ake my own once in a while. So it's not like I'm getting a knife for once every two weeks, but pretty much few times a week.
Also I want my knives to match, yes I said it :) I want them to match, maybe it does not make sense for some people out there but I'm just that way, it would irritate me to have a knife from different set.

Dave Martell
11-13-2012, 07:34 PM
Best Price on the Tojiro ITK F-687 bread knife - http://www.cutleryandmore.com/tojiro/itk-bread-knife-p124765

chinacats
11-13-2012, 09:44 PM
Best Price on the Tojiro ITK F-687 bread knife - http://www.cutleryandmore.com/tojiro/itk-bread-knife-p124765

I hadn't considered one until seeing that it was now available somewhere other than that place I won't shop...but then again, I usually just eat baguettes and my chef's/gyuto's do fine with that style of bread.

toyopl
11-13-2012, 10:20 PM
Why does everyone keep linking Tojiro ITK ? No love for the DP series ?

GlassEye
11-13-2012, 10:23 PM
More like tons of love for the ITK. You should trust the suggestions of the people here, they really know what they are talking about. I will say, you will be happier not choosing knives because they match, but choose each knife for it's own merit.

ChiliPepper
11-14-2012, 01:50 AM
Also I want my knives to match, yes I said it :) I want them to match, maybe it does not make sense for some people out there but I'm just that way, it would irritate me to have a knife from different set.

Well, that settles it, I guess :)

franzb69
11-14-2012, 02:04 AM
the tojiro itk is a wonderful bread knife, for right handers. as for us lefties, there have been issues of steering with them from what i've read. some people suggest the mac bread knife if you're a lefty.

Paradox
11-14-2012, 10:35 AM
Best Price on the Tojiro ITK F-687 bread knife - http://www.cutleryandmore.com/tojiro/itk-bread-knife-p124765

Killer link Dave! Just checked out for one. ;)

Paradox
11-14-2012, 10:39 AM
Why does everyone keep linking Tojiro ITK ? No love for the DP series ?

I like that the ITK is longer and I prefer the sweeping up curved profile of the ITK blade better. The DP is nice though.

heirkb
11-14-2012, 11:05 AM
Isn't the Tojiro DP bread knife also tiny? I remember it seemed useless to me when I saw it when I was browsing around...

You might look into Mac Superior or one of the Misono lines that also has a bread knife if a completely matching set is the only way to go. A 210mm bread knife like the DP just seems silly to me. I'd rather have a longer knife for any style that's meant to slice.

franzb69
11-15-2012, 12:48 AM
itk is way better because of the scalloped teeth as well. makes less mess (crumbs) and does not tear the bread too much. too bad it's not lefty friendly. steers for some lefties as i've read online.

Lefty
11-15-2012, 03:38 PM
Ok, this bread knife talk is getting out of hand. I almost NEVER use a bread knife. I don't get why everyone wants one, unless you are dealing with very crusty bread, daily. Mine is who knows what, made by who knows who.

chinacats
11-15-2012, 04:58 PM
Ok, this bread knife talk is getting out of hand. I almost NEVER use a bread knife. I don't get why everyone wants one, unless you are dealing with very crusty bread, daily. Mine is who knows what, made by who knows who.

:rofl2:

SpikeC
11-15-2012, 04:59 PM
I'm finding that my cheap Chinese cleaver makes a good bread knife.

Johnny.B.Good
11-15-2012, 05:00 PM
Ok, this bread knife talk is getting out of hand. I almost NEVER use a bread knife. I don't get why everyone wants one, unless you are dealing with very crusty bread, daily. Mine is who knows what, made by who knows who.

Maybe I baby my knives too much, but I don't like the idea of using a razor sharp gyuto on a crusty loaf of bread.

Why not use a bread knife?

Lefty
11-15-2012, 05:07 PM
On rolls, and crusty loaves, I use my Kiwi Nakiri and it slices clean through, with minimal crumb throwing. For anything else, I just use whatever is in reach. I love knives far too much, but a fancy bread knife is like getting a custom butter knife made, or a pimped out handle on a carpet knife. Then again, I'm opinionated the day after a shift. Haha. Regardless, I don't get it!

heirkb
11-15-2012, 05:29 PM
I just find that a good bread knife cuts bread nicer and more easily than even a well sharpened "regular" knife. And it's not that expensive (for us, not for people used to $5 knives).

Lefty
11-15-2012, 05:33 PM
You're likely right, all of you! But, I'm still not in the bread knife camp :)

jayhay
11-15-2012, 06:23 PM
Well, I'll add my two cents about the bread knife: I honestly still struggle to understand why someone on a limited budget would invest a lot of money on one of those.they will probably never see a stone (unless you really are pervert :P ) so just get a victorinox for 30ish bucks, it will serve magnificently and when it will get dull (many years in a home enviro) just get another one! :)


Ok, this bread knife talk is getting out of hand. I almost NEVER use a bread knife. I don't get why everyone wants one, unless you are dealing with very crusty bread, daily. Mine is who knows what, made by who knows who.


I'm finding that my cheap Chinese cleaver makes a good bread knife.

Done, done and done. Get a cheapie. You'll use it a few times a yearish. Put $ towards other knives.

apicius9
11-15-2012, 07:14 PM
I'll never understand why there is no love for the bread knife. Well, maybe except for the fact that there is so little edible bread in the US and bread that can be squeezed together to the size of an egg can also be cut with any kind of knife. I wouldn't know what do do without a bread knife. It's the same logic as saying you don't need a slicer because a gyuto can do that also. Why buy a honesuki if you have a petty? Clearly, a petty and a gyuto can do everything, but where is the fun in that? What I would expect from a group like ours is that everyone needs at least 3 different types of bread knives - just look at the different types of serrations out there, maybe the Guede serrations are better for country bread and the Tjiro serrations are better for cakes?

Stefan

heirkb
11-15-2012, 08:07 PM
I'm with Stefan. A good bread knife still cuts bread much better than a well sharpened straight edge knife IME. And I also love my honesuki, even though some say you can do all the same with a petty. There's no way a petty would like some of the things I've done with a honesuki.

It's not like a $60 knife is expensive by any of our standards. Since when did people willing to pay $500 for a gyuto start thinking an amazing $60 knife is expensive? And why in the world would you buy a $30 knife just to add to some landfill? One Tojiro ITK will likely last and in the end be much more economical.

My two cents...

Lefty
11-15-2012, 10:28 PM
Bread knives are the mopeds of the knife world. :D

heirkb
11-15-2012, 10:43 PM
:lol2:

Deckhand
11-15-2012, 10:46 PM
Best Price on the Tojiro ITK F-687 bread knife - http://www.cutleryandmore.com/tojiro/itk-bread-knife-p124765

Yep. That is where I bought mine. Once upon a time. Will never sell mine.

Deckhand
11-15-2012, 10:51 PM
Bread knives are the mopeds of the knife world. :D

Hmm does this video from Theory look like a moped. Just sayin....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvNs4zB6zXg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

I use it for watermelon,cake,mango,pineapple,etc.etc.....

apicius9
11-15-2012, 11:13 PM
Hmm does this video from Theory look like a moped. Just sayin....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvNs4zB6zXg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

I use it for watermelon,cake,mango,pineapple,etc.etc.....

Wait, you don't have a watermelon knife? :D

Stefan

Deckhand
11-15-2012, 11:35 PM
Wait, you don't have a watermelon knife? :D

Stefan

Nope:D Saving my money for some Loco Moco, and my custom uke.

Paradox
11-16-2012, 12:16 PM
Ok, this bread knife talk is getting out of hand. I almost NEVER use a bread knife. I don't get why everyone wants one, unless you are dealing with very crusty bread, daily. Mine is who knows what, made by who knows who.

I have been baking the "no knead bread" about 4 times a week lately and it's very crusty and hard to deal with even with a good bread knife, let alone who knows what by who knows who. ;) The crust really seems to grab the knife. If fact it was this very topic regading the "no knead bread" and how difficult it was to cut on the site we won't mention that got me interested in baking the awesomness that is "no knead bread".

http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/hh99/sjw800/noknead.jpg

Lefty
11-16-2012, 12:21 PM
Nice looking bread! You know, royalty used to only break bread with their hands, and in some places that tradition still exists. That stuff looks like it was made go be torn apart.

Paradox
11-16-2012, 01:20 PM
Thanks. Even after baking this bread quite a few times I am amazed at how nice it comes out with such little effort. Everytime too, almost like I couldn't screw it up if I tried. :cool:

Lefty
11-16-2012, 02:36 PM
Where's the recipe for that? It really does look great!

Deckhand
11-16-2012, 04:01 PM
Where's the recipe for that? It really does look great!
+1:D

apicius9
11-16-2012, 04:16 PM
Nope:D Saving my money for some Loco Moco, and my custom uke.

Dang, now I am hungry again... :)


I have been baking the "no knead bread" about 4 times a week lately and it's very crusty and hard to deal with even with a good bread knife, let alone who knows what by who knows who. ;) The crust really seems to grab the knife. If fact it was this very topic regading the "no knead bread" and how difficult it was to cut on the site we won't mention that got me interested in baking the awesomness that is "no knead bread".


Best thing I discovered in the past few years, just started the dough for tomorrow.


+1:D

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html

That's the basic recipe. I replace part of the flour with whole wheat and rye flour, so mine gets even darker, crunchier and chewier. Glad I have my trusty Guede bread sword.

Stefan

Jmadams13
11-16-2012, 05:41 PM
Head over to breadtopia and look at his recipe. I use this occasionally when I take a break from sourdough, and his advise is the best I have seen on the no knead trend. I will sometimes experiment with different flours too, like 2 1/2 cup bread and 1/2 stone ground wheat, with a little flaxseeds or wheat germ added to the grain bill, maybe even a little tea in place of a 1/3 of water at times. Very useful for when you want bread, but are having a lazy streak. I would add 1/3 of flour to the recipie though to make it a little easier to handle, and a tad tighter crumb for sandwiches.

toyopl
11-16-2012, 08:07 PM
here's the one I've been using, comes out great.

http://foodwishes.blogspot.ca/2009/01/no-knead-ciabatta-bread-you-can-believe.html

Deckhand
11-16-2012, 09:53 PM
Dang, now I am hungry again... :)



Best thing I discovered in the past few years, just started the dough for tomorrow.



http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html

That's the basic recipe. I replace part of the flour with whole wheat and rye flour, so mine gets even darker, crunchier and chewier. Glad I have my trusty Guede bread sword.

Stefan

Thanks bookmarked the recipe. Guede you lucky guy.