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View Full Version : Recommend the perfect summer drink



oivind_dahle
04-30-2011, 02:15 PM
Summer is finally arrived :)

Can you give me your best summerdrinks?

Vertigo
04-30-2011, 02:28 PM
Scotch?

JohnnyChance
04-30-2011, 02:47 PM
Alcoholic?

Caipirinhas are good. Many recipes out there, I prefer just Cachaša, lime juice, and honey or agave nectar. Making a simple syrup with Sugar in the Raw is also good. The granules are too big to dissolve in a muddle, so I cook them in a simple syrup and use that instead.

Also, this. (http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php?180-Cocktails-Chupacabra)
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/_ldEKzBPytxs/TXB_ApRWMGI/AAAAAAAAAMw/NOPHIiW-hAQ/s640/IMG_0283.JPG

mr drinky
04-30-2011, 03:55 PM
A glass (or many) of dry French rose.

K.

bieniek
04-30-2011, 04:00 PM
Tea. Green leaf several times brewed.

Andrew H
04-30-2011, 04:53 PM
Good Arnold Palmer

Pensacola Tiger
04-30-2011, 05:03 PM
Pimm's Cup

http://historicalfoods.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Pimms-Cocktail-3.jpg

http://historicalfoods.com/pimms-cocktail-recipe

Customfan
04-30-2011, 06:07 PM
Mojito! :tongue4:

El Pescador
04-30-2011, 07:47 PM
Pimm's Cup

http://historicalfoods.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Pimms-Cocktail-3.jpg

http://historicalfoods.com/pimms-cocktail-recipe


Love these. So damn refreshing.

Pesky

wenus2
04-30-2011, 09:46 PM
I love a good Salty Dog with fresh squeezed juice, served up (or over if I'm cooking in the sun). This drink also makes a healthy breakfast :)

Mojito's always hit the spot, it's tough to get a well made one though. It's fun to throw random fresh fruit in them in the summer: pineapple, watermelon, mango, and cucumber are all good. Just stay away from really seedy stuff i.e. raspberries.

If you're the whiskey type, which I often am, a Mint Julep is a pleasurable warm weather beverage. Just don't be cheap on your bourbon!

For wine a good Champagne is surely the king, Bollinger is always appropriate.
Muscadet is a personal favorite of mine, Albarino is also winning.

Salty dog
04-30-2011, 10:22 PM
+1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ecchef
05-01-2011, 01:41 AM
Hendrick's gin, splash of Campari, 1" stalk of bruised lemon grass, soda, big ice cube.

mano
05-01-2011, 08:53 AM
Home made sangria
Hendricks tonic with cucumber

lowercasebill
05-01-2011, 12:35 PM
a variation called the porch swing can be found on the smitten kitchen site ... we use homemade lemonade and replace the splash of 7-up with one of seltzer

Delbert Ealy
05-01-2011, 04:56 PM
2 oz of your favorite tequila 4 oz of pineapple juice and 1 oz pomegranate juice.
Kind of like a tequila sunrise, but this is even better. I never heard a name for it, but I order this if they have the ingredients on hand, hawaian sunrise maybe?

Amon-Rukh
05-02-2011, 04:20 AM
Being one who prefers bourbon without stuff in it, I tend to pass on the mint julips. But the Kremlin Colonel has a similar feel for the times when straight booze isn't in the cards.

2oz vodka
1/4 oz lime juice
1/2 tsp sugar

Shake, serve over rocks with bruised mint leaves.

mpukas
05-05-2011, 01:14 AM
giner-peach mojito made w/ fresh Palisades peacehs!!!

99Limited
05-06-2011, 12:06 PM
Sangria, with lots of fruit.

MadMel
05-06-2011, 01:10 PM
Prosecco or super chilled beer.

deker
05-07-2011, 03:46 PM
I have to agree on the Mint Julep and Mojito, but this summer I've chosen the Cuba Libre. My personal favorite is Ron Zacapa Centenario rum, juice of 1/4 lime, and DIET Coke. Don't know why, but Diet Coke is better for a Cuba Libre. Maybe because it's less sweet. If you don't feel like spending the $$ for the Ron Zacapa, or if you can't find it around you, Cruzan (preferably the 12 year) is a good substitute.

-d

Salty dog
05-07-2011, 07:23 PM
Kettle One.....up. Winter, summer spring, no dif.

mr drinky
05-07-2011, 09:09 PM
I'm with you there Salty. Vodka straight is my go-to drink. I usually put a half cube of crushed ice in it or just chill it really good. But I have the luxury of going to Ukraine often and bringing back the good stuff. A couple of years back I hosted a blind vodka tasting. Stoli Elite won, second was Hanger One, and third was Beluga Gold.

k.

apicius9
05-07-2011, 09:45 PM
Mint juleps with Makers Mark or mojitos when I want it boozy. On a lighter side, 50/50 white wine and tonic water with lots of lemon. One of my favorite virgin ones: Fresh mint leaves & a tablespoon of ginger sirup over crushed ice, filled up with Sprite or club soda (works with basil also).

Stefan

EdipisReks
05-07-2011, 09:51 PM
mojitos are the best way to drink a bottle of rum without realizing it. :)

99Limited
05-07-2011, 11:43 PM
mojitos are the best way to drink a bottle of rum without realizing it. :)

Until it's too late. :devilburn:

Craig
05-09-2011, 11:19 AM
Gin out of the freezer with a twist of lime. If I'm really thirsty it gets some tonic, but that's rare. More often than not, thirsty means beer.

I highly recommend North Shore Distiller's #6. North Shore is a great little distiller out of Illinois who do everything in small batches and whatnot. According to their website (http://www.northshoredistillery.com/) you can only get their stuff in California, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Washington and Wisconsin. I have no idea how Ontario ended up on that list, but I'm very grateful.

cnochef
05-09-2011, 12:14 PM
Paloma-Tequila, grapefruit juice, lime, soda water

EdipisReks
05-09-2011, 12:37 PM
Gin out of the freezer with a twist of lime. If I'm really thirsty it gets some tonic, but that's rare. More often than not, thirsty means beer.

I highly recommend North Shore Distiller's #6. North Shore is a great little distiller out of Illinois who do everything in small batches and whatnot. According to their website (http://www.northshoredistillery.com/) you can only get their stuff in California, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Ontario, Pennsylvania, Washington and Wisconsin. I have no idea how Ontario ended up on that list, but I'm very grateful.

i haven't had Distiller's #6, yet. Blue Coat, Junipero and Hendrick's are my favorites, in that order.

Craig
05-09-2011, 03:09 PM
i haven't had Distiller's #6, yet. Blue Coat, Junipero and Hendrick's are my favorites, in that order.

In Ontario, I can only seem to find major international brands. Of them, I was always a fan of Hendrick's, Bulldog and Sapphire. I much prefer #6, though I can't say how it stacks up to Blue Coat or Junipero, as they've never been available.

tk59
05-09-2011, 03:30 PM
I like Rieslings from Alsace but they cost an arm and a leg here. German's are definite crowd pleasers. Most of my faves come from MSR but it's hard to find a bad one lately.

mhlee
05-09-2011, 05:26 PM
I like Rieslings from Alsace but they cost an arm and a leg here. German's are definite crowd pleasers. Most of my faves come from MSR but it's hard to find a bad one lately.

I know that vineyard specific rieslings are expensive, but when I went to Total Wine and More (in Redondo Beach) this weekend, I saw a bunch of non-vineyard specific rieslings from Trimbach, Zind Humbrecht and Hugel for relatively decent prices (around $15). The one maker from Alsace that I've had that's not as recognized as some of the bigger names that makes excellent stuff is Dirler.

I second the recommendation for German rieslings from Mosel Saar Ruwer. Good stuff.

Otherwise, good Bourbon on the rocks. :headbang:

apicius9
05-09-2011, 05:47 PM
I know that vineyard specific rieslings are expensive, but when I went to Total Wine and More (in Redondo Beach) this weekend, I saw a bunch of non-vineyard specific rieslings from Trimbach, Zind Humbrecht and Hugel for relatively decent prices (around $15). The one maker from Alsace that I've had that's not as recognized as some of the bigger names that makes excellent stuff is Dirler.

I second the recommendation for German rieslings from Mosel Saar Ruwer. Good stuff.

Otherwise, good Bourbon on the rocks. :headbang:

I grew up with German rieslings, but it looks like we drink the good ones in Germany... There has been a trend to produce sweeter rieslings over the previous years, but I think most of the ones consumed in Germany are still reasonably dry. We ship most of the sweet stuff to the US and GB :) There are times for a sweet riesling, and I also like a good riesling dessert wine, but as a refreshing drink in the summer I miss the dry ones. I also generally prefer Rheingau or Rheinpfalz wines over the MSR ones.

The standard bottlings of the large Alsatian producers are o.k., especially the Gewuerztraminers. A great alternative are Austrian (NOT Australian) whites. Their dry whites made from the 'gruener veltliner' grape are excellent food wines. Unfortunately, they are also a bit pricy.

Stefan

mr drinky
05-09-2011, 06:19 PM
+1 on the Austrian whites. If I were to choose two whites to drink they would be from Austria and the Okanagan area of Canada. Great whites. I just had a Rotgipfler white from Austria that was very, very good and almost bought some more today. The only thing I am more addicted to than knife stuff are bottles of wine. I just bought two cases of white in prep for this summer (well -- actually just the last part of May). But I do need to get on my wine shipments before the weather turns hotter.

k.

tk59
05-09-2011, 06:20 PM
I don't see to many gruener veltliners. As a matter of fact, I've seen and tasted exactly two. I'm surprised you get much of anything in HI. What is it about the Rheingau/pfalz wines that you prefer them? I'd forgotten about the drier germans, I remember not having had too much difficulty finding decent trocken/halb-trocken offerings but they've sort of just disappeared, come to think of it. I didn't even notice.

ecchef
05-09-2011, 06:30 PM
Grain alcohol with rain water or distilled water...

mhlee
05-09-2011, 06:38 PM
I don't see to many gruener veltliners. As a matter of fact, I've seen and tasted exactly two. I'm surprised you get much of anything in HI. What is it about the Rheingau/pfalz wines that you prefer them? I'd forgotten about the drier germans, I remember not having had too much difficulty finding decent trocken/halb-trocken offerings but they've sort of just disappeared, come to think of it. I didn't even notice.

I think it depends on where you shop. I can name a few places that have trocken rieslings from MSR; I know I've seen a few places with Rheingau/Pfalz trocken rieslings as well.

I appreciate Austrian Gruner Veltliners but the grapefruit/sour citrus flavor and white pepper flavors are unique and go well with certain foods. They're generally in the $15-$20 range here in California.

One wine that I've also forgotten about (because prices have gone up) are Pinot Grigios from the Collio region in Italy. They're not the thin swill that many Pinot Grigios are.

apicius9
05-09-2011, 06:40 PM
I can't afford too many addictions, so wine is the one I gave up - I sold, drank or gave away my 800 bottle cellar before I moved to the US. Now I live with 100 bottles in my 2 small wine fridges, and the earth still moves and life continues :) And, to my surprise, we do have a very good wine selection out here, some even at very reasonable prices. Considering the climate and the value, I have mostly turned to NZ sauvignon blancs in whites and occasionally a nice rose, very few reds. Right now, one of my 50 bottle fridges is full with German dessert wines. I need to make more occasions to drink the good stuff...

Hard to describe why I am not crazy about the Mosel wines. They have a specific note that I am not crazy about. I find the Rheingau/pfalz wines cleaner, crisper, But, of course, it is impossible to generalize like that. Within the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer region, I prefer the Saar wines. I think Doenhoff is easy to get in the US (at a price), he is the star in that region and produces some of the best German whites - period. But if you ever come across wines from Van Volxem - buy them :) They are mostly very slightly off-dry and IMHO one of the best values out there, perfect food wines with Asian foods.

Since I moved out here 5 years ago, I haven't had many chance to keep up with the recent developments and new producers, but some have established themselves and there are a few reviewers in Germany whom I trust, that's how I try to stay in the loop. But as I said, many are not even available in the US. Oh, Leitz from the Rheingau region does export extensively into the US, he is also very high on my lost.

Stefan

mr drinky
05-09-2011, 07:25 PM
I shop at Crush Wine out of NY (via the internet). They have Van Volxem, and that is where I got my Rotgipfler too. They seem to have a pretty good selection of Austrian and German wines, so I will have to try one next time I buy from them.

http://www.crushwineandspirits.com (http://www.crushwineandspirits.com/results.aspx?fromBrowse=se=van&qs=t&t=000)

k.

mhlee
05-09-2011, 07:26 PM
I can't afford too many addictions, so wine is the one I gave up - I sold, drank or gave away my 800 bottle cellar before I moved to the US. Now I live with 100 bottles in my 2 small wine fridges, and the earth still moves and life continues :) And, to my surprise, we do have a very good wine selection out here, some even at very reasonable prices. Considering the climate and the value, I have mostly turned to NZ sauvignon blancs in whites and occasionally a nice rose, very few reds. Right now, one of my 50 bottle fridges is full with German dessert wines. I need to make more occasions to drink the good stuff...

Hard to describe why I am not crazy about the Mosel wines. They have a specific note that I am not crazy about. I find the Rheingau/pfalz wines cleaner, crisper, But, of course, it is impossible to generalize like that. Within the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer region, I prefer the Saar wines. I think Doenhoff is easy to get in the US (at a price), he is the star in that region and produces some of the best German whites - period. But if you ever come across wines from Van Volxem - buy them :) They are mostly very slightly off-dry and IMHO one of the best values out there, perfect food wines with Asian foods.

Since I moved out here 5 years ago, I haven't had many chance to keep up with the recent developments and new producers, but some have established themselves and there are a few reviewers in Germany whom I trust, that's how I try to stay in the loop. But as I said, many are not even available in the US. Oh, Leitz from the Rheingau region does export extensively into the US, he is also very high on my lost.

Stefan

Donhoff is excellent! I happened to buy two bottles on clearance (older vintage) for a great price a few years back. My girlfriend and I had it with terrine of foie gras. Foie gras and Riesling are one of the world's greatest food and wine matches. And the Donhoff was outstanding - it had great balance and good acidity, even though it was slightly sweet.

Thanks for the Van Volxem and Leitz recommendation. I will definitely look for them.

apicius9
05-09-2011, 07:43 PM
Just to make sure, the van Volxem wines are mostly off-dry, but they are beautifully balanced IMHO. I used to buy the simple Saar Riesling, their entry wine, by the case(s). After accounting for the exchange rate, the shipping and paying all the %$$%$% who add their profit in the US system, it's a little steep for an every-day wine IMHO, but still a nice food wine (Thai food!) - or a wine for sipping on the lanai in the summer.

Stefan



I shop at Crush Wine out of NY (via the internet). They have Van Volxem, and that is where I got my Rotgipfler too. They seem to have a pretty good selection of Austrian and German wines, so I will have to try one next time I buy from them.

http://www.crushwineandspirits.com (http://www.crushwineandspirits.com/results.aspx?fromBrowse=se=van&qs=t&t=000)

k.

tk59
05-09-2011, 07:46 PM
I can't afford too many addictions, so wine is the one I gave up - I sold, drank or gave away my 800 bottle cellar before I moved to the US. Now I live with 100 bottles in my 2 small wine fridges, and the earth still moves and life continues :) Stefan

I know the feeling... My wine buddies are all wondering what the hell I'm doing with all this "knife junk"...

EdipisReks
05-09-2011, 08:33 PM
I know the feeling... My wine buddies are all wondering what the hell I'm doing with all this "knife junk"...

ha. my wine buddies are other knife knuts, so they understand. :)