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Korin_Mari
12-06-2012, 12:19 PM
A member brought to my attention that I never posted about Korin's awesome rubber cutting boards. I feel silly. This should have been one of the first things I posted. :sigh:

As many of you may have noticed, Korin doesn't sell wooden cutting boards. Why you ask? It's because most states and cruise lines ban wooden cutting boards in professional kitchens (including NY).

Just curious has anyone here ever used a rubber cutting board? They're pretty awesome. I had the pleasure of using one this past Thanks Giving actually. (I had a thanks giving cook off dinner party for strays.) I don't have enough kitchenware in the house (ironically), so I told everyone to bring their own stuff.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8337/8250463614_2b49b205f1_c.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/68766473@N04/8250463614/)
(Not my hands.)

The benefits to rubber cutting boards at Korin :

Non-slip surface
More scratch resistant surface than plastic
Has a soft surface for knives, so you can have a longer edge retention.
Aesthetically pleasing (in my opinion)


Cons to rubber cutting boards :

Require more care than plastic. You can't use hot water on it or else it'll warp, since its rubber.
Heavier than plastic cutting board. Probably weighs as much as a wooden one.



We have 3 types of rubber cutting boards :

http://korin.com/core/media/media.nl?id=33599&c=832324&h=de0f3047958f859823ad

The Hi-soft cutting board (http://korin.com/HiSoft-Cutting-Board) has a top grade synthetic surface that closely resembles wood in color, texture and softness. The soft polyvinyl acetate material reduces impact on knives for a longer lasting edge retention, while still providing a non-slip surface.
Material: High-Soft (polyvinyl acetate)
Price : $69.90 $399.00 depending on size

http://korin.com/TK-201-06_s.jpg

Synthetic Cutting Board (http://korin.com/Synthetic-Cutting-Board_2) has a forgiving and durable yet slightly harder surface than Hi-Soft. Resembles wood in color. These cutting boards are increasingly popular in busy kitchens, due to it's durability and cost effectiveness.
Price : $179.00 $299.00 depending on size

http://korin.com/TK-202-07_s.jpg

The Asahi Rubber Cutting Board (http://korin.com/Asahi-Rubber-Cutting-Board_3) is the hardest cutting board offered by KORIN. It does not scratch easily, and very popular in sushi bars, because it closely resembles wood in looks and texture.
Price : $289.00 $599.00 depending on size

Care & Precautions


Highest Temp: 70C or 158F
Lowest Temp: -30C or -22F
Exposure to extreme heat, boiling water and sterilizers may cause warping or softening.
Use bleach (approx. 20 minutes) to remove stubborn stains. Make sure to wash thoroughly afterward.
We recommend flipping the board everyday to allow for even wear.


I'm thinking about asking management if I could send the hi-soft out for a pass around. Would people be interested? It's going to be a little expensive shipping it to each other...

markenki
12-06-2012, 12:35 PM
Thanks, Mari. Would you know how do these compare with sani-tuff boards?

Don Nguyen
12-06-2012, 12:55 PM
(Not my hands.)

I like the disclaimer.

cclin
12-06-2012, 12:59 PM
I tried my friend's once, and I just couldn't get used to the tactile feedback of rubber & I find it Dulls knives faster (somehow??:dontknow:), Stain & Gouge easily! maybe the Rubber Cutting Board I tried is cheap one?? I did used little hefty small Chinese cleaver on it with lots chopping motion......

Iceman91
12-06-2012, 01:01 PM
We have a few of these boards at work and i must say they are very nice. So much easier on your edge than the poly boards. A really good investment for a commercial kitchen when wood boards aren't available or allowed.

brainsausage
12-06-2012, 01:12 PM
I just finished a Servsafe class, and they allow hardwood boards. They're actually NSF certified. Of course, state to state the laws differ, but I think it's a big misconception that they aren't safe for use in commercial kitchens.

Btw- not trying to derail this thread Mari:)

These boards are definitely the next best thing to wood IMO.

Don Nguyen
12-06-2012, 01:13 PM
Are there any videos out there where this board is in use? I've found a couple where people have used the Sani-Tuff, and it sounded surprisingly more stiff/dense than I expected.

eshua
12-06-2012, 01:37 PM
We've normally gotten Sani-tuff, and while its a challenge to keep them out of the dish machine, they are totally worth it. We also have one thicker black one from yamasho.

Always been curious about the high price of that one and the ones you sell.
I guess a harder rubber has less sticking from a sharp knife. The reason we bought our 350$ board was because it released rice a lot easier and make keeping the middle station clean less of a hassle.

Can't see paying that much for a regular kitchen, but probably there are advantages I haven't thought about.

Korin_Mari
12-06-2012, 01:42 PM
you're the second person to ask me that today... Unfortunately I've never used a sani-tuff board, so I can't tell you. I'll see if Korin will let me order one to try out.

Korin_Mari
12-06-2012, 01:44 PM
I like the disclaimer.

Don't need people to think I'm a female with large slightly hairy man hands. LOL

tk59
12-06-2012, 11:45 PM
...slightly hairy man hands...That's exactly what I was thinking, lol. I have a Sani-Tuff. It's butt-ugly but it works great. I'd love to get a nicer version.

Don Nguyen
12-07-2012, 12:03 AM
Tinh, what would make the Sani-Tuff nicer? Is it lacking something as a cutting board, or is it just aesthetics?

These Hi Soft are seriously sounding really cool. I'll probably have to get one.

TamanegiKin
12-07-2012, 04:20 AM
I have a sani tuff too, for home and most places I've worked had 'em.
I think the hi soft are supposed to be softer or more forgiving than sani tuff.

tk59
12-07-2012, 03:37 PM
...what would make the Sani-Tuff nicer? Is it lacking something as a cutting board...

The Sani-Tuff just looks bad. It gets marred, dirty, scuffed and dented easily and the material seems to highlight every imperfection unlike wood, for example. In terms of cutting, it's fine.

Vertigo
12-07-2012, 03:59 PM
The shockingly low temp tolerance on these is a deal-breaker for me, otherwise I'd get one in a heartbeat.

Mingooch
12-07-2012, 04:49 PM
can anyone identify the knife in the background?

EdipisReks
12-07-2012, 05:00 PM
has anybody tried a Mat King board?

tk59
12-07-2012, 05:13 PM
The shockingly low temp tolerance on these is a deal-breaker for me, otherwise I'd get one in a heartbeat.What are you cutting at 70 deg C? I do see the possibility of accidents though. Like someone setting a cup of tea on a board or something...

Korin_Mari
12-07-2012, 05:15 PM
can anyone identify the knife in the background?

It's the Suisin Korin collaboration special inox santoku.

This one:
http://korin.com/HSU-SO-SA180_s.jpg
http://korin.com/Suisin-Special-Inox-Santoku-with-the-Orange-Handle

My food loving gamer friend told me to engrave whatever I wanted, so I engraved "level 10 glutton." :)

Benuser
12-07-2012, 05:15 PM
Don't need people to think I'm a female with large slightly hairy man hands. LOL
Nothing wrong with these hands. I'd expected you would disclaim because of the watch. Why do people wear a watch - or rings or whatever - when they work with food??

Korin_Mari
12-07-2012, 05:18 PM
What are you cutting at 70 deg C? I do see the possibility of accidents though. Like someone setting a cup of tea on a board or something...

The temperature bit mainly just means don't wash it with hot water or else it will eventually warp. It is rubber after all.
I know, its a little confusing. lol

Korin_Mari
12-07-2012, 05:19 PM
Nothing wrong with these hands. I'd expected you would disclaim because of the watch. Why do people wear a watch - or rings or whatever - when they work with food??

Yea really... But this is just my house on Thanks giving. We were all cooking together. :)

Jim
12-07-2012, 05:38 PM
Just as an aside, I put my sanituff boards in the dishwasher all the time. Just lay them on a flat counter-top while they are warm and they will be Fine.

Vertigo
12-07-2012, 05:40 PM
What are you cutting at 70 deg C?
Anything that has been cooked? Lol.

Besides, 158F is like nothing, and kitchens are notoriously full of hot things that get picked up and moved around. Hot pans, hot lids, hot sauces, hot coffee. If my fingertips can handle hotter temps than my cutting board, something has gone wrong.

EdipisReks
12-07-2012, 05:51 PM
i really think the temps are a CYA thing.

Vertigo
12-07-2012, 05:59 PM
i really think the temps are a CYA thing.

You're probably right, I just have a vision in my head of plopping a chicken breast out of the oven onto this thing, and it getting stuck. :D

mhlee
12-07-2012, 06:10 PM
i really think the temps are a CYA thing.

I agree with this.

I was curious to find out what the maximum recommended temperature for a Sani-Tuff is but I couldn't find it. Nonetheless, according to Amazon, if it warps, you can put it into a 220 degree oven, weighted down, to make it flat again. "If your board has warped, you can restore its straightness in either of two ways. The first is to wash the board in the dishwasher, remove before the drying cycle and, while still warm, place the board on a flat surface and weigh it down with something heavy. In the second method, place the board in your oven at 220F for less than 20 minutes and (like in the first method), flatten the board with a heavy object." 220 is barely above boiling water, which isn't that much more than 158.

For what it's worth, I just purchased a Hi-Soft board (from JKI) and I love it. I've only used it for a little while at home, but it hasn't gouged up like Sani-Tuffs do, can stain (but they remove after a few washings), but feel awesome when cutting. They feel soft when cutting, without the gouging, and have a very nice non-slip texture about them. (I used to regularly work on a Sani-Tuff board years ago. It was really durable, but got seriously gouged up and got a little smelly on occasion - it was the board at the fish market I worked at.) So far, I think it's worth the money. Because they're so much easier to clean, I don't really use my wood boards much anymore. Granted, it's not as pretty as wood board, but when doing a lot of prep, it's nice to be able to wash it down with soap and water, dry it off with a towel, and get right back to it.

Don Nguyen
12-07-2012, 06:34 PM
I was just going to ask about Hi-Softs with scuffing and stuff. Thanks Michael. Does it look better than Sani-Tuff at least?

Now I'm REALLY going to get one, hopefully early next year.

tk59
12-07-2012, 07:03 PM
I didn't realize that board you've been raving about is the same thing, Michael... Hmm... Very tempting.

Crothcipt
12-08-2012, 12:32 AM
I have used a rubber board before, I liked the tactile feed back from the rubber. Not just hard plastic but a little more give to it. You def. notice the difference when you try one.

quantumcloud509
12-08-2012, 03:05 AM
Cool thread. I actually just learned about sani-tuff boards the other day myself...thanks for bringing this post around Korin_Mari

Jim
12-08-2012, 01:10 PM
you're the second person to ask me that today... Unfortunately I've never used a sani-tuff board, so I can't tell you. I'll see if Korin will let me order one to try out.

Mari,
You can wander down to Hung Chong Imports, 14 Bowery, 212-349-3392, between Pell St and Doyers and pick one up. Stop into the Chop Stick store around the corner- Who knew a storefront could house that many!

slowtyper
02-11-2013, 11:20 PM
Mari,
You can wander down to Hung Chong Imports, 14 Bowery, 212-349-3392, between Pell St and Doyers and pick one up. Stop into the Chop Stick store around the corner- Who knew a storefront could house that many!

Is that a 3 storied store? I bought a sanituff at such a store while on vacation in NYC. Yes, that's how I spent my vacation, wandering restaurant supply stores in chinatown! Also bought some aprons which I like a lot!

At work we have a bunch of really crappy wooden cutting boards. I mean, they were good at one point, but they just all go in the dishwasher and some are splitting, and all are badly dished. I found one heavy rubber cutting board that nobody uses though because it "feels weird". Someone warned me about using my nice knives on that board as it might ruin them. Anyways, I didn't bother telling anyone that its a good board to use so its mine all the time now haha.

I put it in the dishwasher all the time.

Is there a good way to sand them down to get rid of the plentiful gouges though?

franzb69
02-12-2013, 04:23 AM
if only shipping wasn't gonna cost me more than the actual value of the board, i'd get one in a heartbeat.