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NO ChoP!
12-25-2012, 11:51 AM
For years the use of any rod or steel has been shunned within the forums.

I have a black Mac ceramic rod, and decided to put it to the test. Since my move down south I've been at the same CC. For the past four months I have used a Konosuke HD as my daily driver. It gets used frequently as I prep my grill/ saute station daily.

I haven't put it to the stones once. Not one single time since I started. I use the ceramic rod. Pretty much before use I run the knife down the rod, carefully. A few light, accurate passes is all it takes.

Four months and its still Sharp. Very Sharp. Infact its probably the sharpest knife in a kitchen of forty plus guys. I inspected my angle with a loupe, and its still straight and accute; no rounding.

I've questioned the frequency of sharpening before, and I am convinced with proper care, a non-abusive technique and light honing, a good edge can and should last a long while, even with daily use.

I'm sure many will disagree, and continue to put their expensive knives to the stones everyweek, but I am convinced, through my own experience, it's wasteful.

knyfeknerd
12-25-2012, 12:09 PM
Chris, what grit would you say your rod is?
I have a ceramic probably around the 1200 range that I have used as my primary "sharpening device" over this super busy 2 month long holiday season. The season where I don't get a day or night off from mid October to the end of the year. AKA no time for stones.
I find a few passes on the rod followed by some stropping on the day's prep list or invoices is sufficient enough to carry me through most days. Granted that some of my blades are way different steel and HT wise, some require more love than others.....
...but I'm with you. I've become quite the sharpening minimalist lately. My knives' performance in a pro-high volume kitchen is still quite acceptable.

But when I get a day or two to myself, I'm going to swarfland fo sho.

NO ChoP!
12-25-2012, 12:18 PM
I think its 2k. And, I'm in the same boat; busy season and having to sharpen on my own time = no sharpening.

Also agreed with different steel = different technique. Last year I went months without sharpening a moritaka gyuto, and used only a strop....

ThEoRy
12-25-2012, 01:18 PM
It's like stropping on a 2000 grit ceramic stone.

tk59
12-25-2012, 01:31 PM
There are a couple of angles here: technique and abrasion vs realignment. Ceramic rods or basically the same as stones. They simply require different technique. The harder the steel, the more careful you need to be to avoid chipping. Like Theory said, it's is the same as using a 1-2k stone. Smooth rods are meant to do nothing more than realign edges. In this case, softer steels can benefit but harder steels will tend to degrade by microchipping so there won't be anything to realign. Furthermore, smooth steel rods (64 ish hrc) will tend to be scratched by hard knife steel. Grooved steel rods are meant to realign and to shear away weakened steel. These rods will give a perpetually uneven, jagged, coarse edge that is effective but unrefined and again, this is only for softer blades. The KonHD at 60-61 hrc is not super hard nor is it particularly soft so it should respond well to abrasion (ceramic rod) and moderately well to smooth rods. The grooved steels are pretty much only for people that don't have the luxury of using refined edges and harder blades.

Miles
12-25-2012, 01:43 PM
+1 on the ceramic rod. I keep one in my kit and use it every day. Just a very delicate touch keeps my knives going nicely and when the rod starts to become a bit less effective, I take the blades to a diamond paste coated MDF strop which brings them back to the fresh from the stone stage. Between the rod and the diamond paste, I can really stretch out the time between sessions on the stones.

stevenStefano
12-25-2012, 01:44 PM
I have the Mac rod but I use it the odd time, but not that much. I find it works but fairly quickly it becomes a vicious circle where the edge it gives doesn't seem to last so I end up using it more and more. For one of my Niolox knives it work much better than stropping but I generally only use the rod when I am lazy

Notaskinnychef
12-25-2012, 01:53 PM
So, another newb question here, I recently got my CN and am enjoying it, but due to my sharpening technique on stones being lackluster (altho I am practicing all the time on my crap knives) is finding a good high grit ceramic honing rod or stroping the most effective way to diminish the frequency of using a stone. This is for home use only, as I am not a pro chef.

Pensacola Tiger
12-25-2012, 02:07 PM
So, another newb question here, I recently got my CN and am enjoying it, but due to my sharpening technique on stones being lackluster (altho I am practicing all the time on my crap knives) is finding a good high grit ceramic honing rod or stroping the most effective way to diminish the frequency of using a stone. This is for home use only, as I am not a pro chef.

There is no magic to a rod. Regardless of whether you use a rod or a stone, you must develop technique. Lousy technique on a rod will not produce good results.

A rod is just more convenient if you are a pro and don't have space for a stone.

Notaskinnychef
12-25-2012, 02:17 PM
oh i know, i have been using a rod in the past on my crap knives with some success, just SS box store ones. I feel that my technique is better on a rod than a stone right now, altho I am working on that

chinacats
12-25-2012, 02:22 PM
Personally I find I keep more consistent angles on stones--maybe because of having more surface contact area. I think most people tend not to use a steel (rod) properly.
:2cents:

NO ChoP!
12-25-2012, 02:22 PM
Most of the guys in my kitchen use steels in a very sloppy quick style, reminiscent of what we've all seen on TV. I use very soft deliberate strokes, and keep focused on my angle....works well for me.

Definitely not a fresh from the stone edge, but gets it to 90% I'd say...

shaneg
12-25-2012, 06:18 PM
Most of the guys in my kitchen use steels in a very sloppy quick style, reminiscent of what we've all seen on TV. I use very soft deliberate strokes, and keep focused on my angle....l.

most chefs ive seen use something horribly similar to this.. http://m.videojug.com/film/sharpening-a-knife-with-a-steel which i cringe at, if they are going to do that i usually suggest to them putting their thumb on the other side next to their finger on the steel as ive seen someone cut into their knuckle.

if i steel i hold mine vertically and pointing down, either onto the board or standing back from the bench, and not too fast or not too slow but at a speed where i can keep the same angle, i try and keep it as flat as possible, roughly 16°

Whats Everyones steel method?

chinacats
12-25-2012, 06:35 PM
I lay it down because that's where I can recognize the angle...like putting it on a stone, angle depends on the knife. I prefer a stone or strop though for American and J-knives and usually only steel my French carbons and German stainless.

labor of love
12-25-2012, 06:43 PM
i dont use a rod anymore but when i did i had the mac rod. i definitely rested the tip on the table and used slow even strokes. not violent, lightning fast, "gordon ramsay" strokes! check out his youtube vid, its pretty comical.

Crothcipt
12-25-2012, 07:18 PM
I bought a Ruby rod, here recently. It seems quite smooth, but it does cut more steel off than I am accustomed to. Pretty much I use it now for stropping very lightly, if at all. If I go to much on it I can see with a naked eye a wire edge forming really fast.

WiscoNole
12-26-2012, 12:16 AM
I just don't think any sort of rod is necessary with the kind of knives many of us have. Not only that, but part of owning these knives is maintaining them on the stones and getting the most out of them...the way they are intended to be used.

miketayl0r
12-26-2012, 12:33 AM
I just don't think any sort of rod is necessary with the kind of knives many of us have. Not only that, but part of owning these knives is maintaining them on the stones and getting the most out of them...the way they are intended to be used.
+1

mr drinky
12-26-2012, 12:36 AM
I just don't think any sort of rod is necessary with the kind of knives many of us have. Not only that, but part of owning these knives is maintaining them on the stones and getting the most out of them...the way they are intended to be used.

I fully admit to times when I don't maintain my knives as I should. Family, illness, work and other life circumstances often arise. If during these times I can't sharpen, then I strop. If stropping doesn't do it, I use the borosilicate hone. If that doesn't work, I use my ceramic 1200 grit idahnone. When life and knives catch up again -- I hit the stones and make things good again.

k.

WiscoNole
12-26-2012, 02:04 AM
I can understand that, but at the same time, I can raise a burr and put a good edge on just about any carbon knife with a Gesshin 2k in literally 2-3 minutes.

mr drinky
12-26-2012, 02:11 AM
I can understand that, but at the same time, I can raise a burr and put a good edge on just about any carbon knife with a Gesshin 2k in literally 2-3 minutes.

Without a doubt you are correct...but bringing out the stones, soaking, and putting stuff away takes way longer and the wife hates me doing it in the kitchen. When I perma-soak them in the garage in the summer though it is no problem. It's all quick then -- but summer is only so long ;)

k.

kalaeb
12-26-2012, 03:02 AM
I dont have a rod, but I see where Chris is comming from. For me, when I say sharpening, I seldom go through a full grit progression. Usually I just make a few edge leading passes on either my Gesshin 5, or my Kityama followed by a cn strop. Its really only when I damage the edge, or get a new knife that I drop down below 2k.

ThEoRy
12-26-2012, 03:39 AM
I can understand that, but at the same time, I can raise a burr and put a good edge on just about any carbon knife with a Gesshin 2k in literally 2-3 minutes.

During the middle of 100lbs of onions for French onion soup it's simply a matter of convenience to swipe two times on the rod vs setting up my stone and strop at work. I can and will do that too when time and situation allows. The rod still has a place in the kitchen though.

quantumcloud509
12-26-2012, 03:51 AM
Any of you guys rod Takedas? What do you use?

ChiliPepper
12-26-2012, 05:44 AM
I'm really not sure about this one. Like many of you I used to go to the ceramic rod (DMT superfine) inbetween stone spa treatments but then I heard about rods not being quite good for jknives and, through trial and error (and a good dose of laziness :) ) I realized that a few stropping moves over my dry 5k stone do a pretty decent job to keep a good edge. Yeah, it tends to make the stone surface rather "slippery" or "glassy" on the long run but then when the next proper stone session occurs it's just a matter of reconditioning it as you would when flattening.Again, I'm a newbie and prob this is wrong by proper standards but it seems to work...

keithsaltydog
12-26-2012, 06:17 AM
Totally agree almost all steel use in production kitchens often over time does more harm than good.Angle of spine is important,a lite sweep,not bearing down on the rod.I have found through trail & ERROR,that for me smooth polishing steels & smooth ceramics used correctly will prolong long cutting sessions until you can get to the stones again.

Smooth steels & ceramics do have a place in the kitchen IF used correctly,rarely the case.Diamond steels are popular now,I have seen cooks wailing away on diamond steels at a high angle,trying to cut in a new edge,it always ends in failure.

shaneg
12-26-2012, 07:58 AM
I must also admit ive never owned a steel, but used to use other chefs, for awhile i was honing on the underside of ceramic/porcelain plates, it works quite well, just place it on a damp towel, gets a few weird looks from other chefs though.

I always take my stones to work and am on the clock when i get the stones out for a session, soak them while i start the days prep/getting organised for the day, give them a touch up on 4k, have been de burring on cardboard lately.

Mike9
12-26-2012, 09:38 AM
I have a Mac rod and an Idhone ceramic. I like the Mac better and use it to keep[ my edges in line when I'm to busy to break out the stones. Seems to be a common theme for a lot of us. I like to sharpen I find it very relaxing, but don't always have the time.

NO ChoP!
12-26-2012, 11:22 AM
I used to back strop on my higher grit shaptons. Now, where I'm at, its never actually been said we can't sharpen on stones during working hours. I just don't want to be the guy to find out...

The bad thing about Country Clubs is theres different departments. And when you're caught up and would usually pull out the stones, there is sure to be another department that's in the $hit$, and needs help. The work is seemingly never ending. Of course I'm that guy that busts my butt to get set up(fine dining grill/ saute), and will immediately volunteer my services(usually to the banquet department). While others will chop parsley endlessly, until our first ticket is in....

panda
12-26-2012, 02:31 PM
steel on ceramic rod, then strop on cardboard - quickest and easiest daily maintenance until next sharpening session which in pro kitchen seems an eternity because i never have the time nor the energy. you all know what i'm talking about, when you actually do have time, all you want to do is get everything done quick so that you can go home early or get out to the bars faster.

Miles
12-26-2012, 03:41 PM
Every once in a while, we actually have a breather between prep and class. When we do, that's when I take out the strop kit from my bag and go to town. Last week, after a particularly busy prep where I used four different knives, I took out the strops and did all but two knives in my kit. It was great. I love seeing the looks on the other chefs' faces when they check out the edge on one of my freshly stropped knives. That's a bit rare though. Usually, it's just my Mac ceramic and if the edges just aren't staying where they need to be, I'll pull out the strops and do a quick five minute session just to restore it, but when that has to happen, it's usually a sign that it's time for me to hit the stones.

keithsaltydog
12-26-2012, 05:25 PM
steel on ceramic rod, then strop on cardboard - quickest and easiest daily maintenance until next sharpening session which in pro kitchen seems an eternity because i never have the time nor the energy. you all know what i'm talking about, when you actually do have time, all you want to do is get everything done quick so that you can go home early or get out to the bars faster.

Ummmm:O,why is it that us cooks like to go out after work,order pupu's & drink beer?I've never seen a strop in a kitchen,but a small portable strop could be useful.Now at home I use a stop quite a bit esp sharpening other's knives it leaves a highly polished cool looking edge.

Liked to soak my stone during the end of service & sharp my knives after service.Aways enjoyed sharpening,find it relaxing after putting out all those function sheets.No one ever bothered about,they are the tools of your trade.

mpukas
12-26-2012, 06:00 PM
I've had my Yusuke KS Clone for over 6 months now, and haven't sharpened it properly on the stones yet. I do this technique on other knives as well, and the results vary depending on maker and steel, but the Yusuke Swedish SS gives me the best results.

I've been using the MAC Black rod and Boron, ChrOx, & leather strops. On the rod I do 3 strokes each side edge leading heel to tip, 3 strokes each sides edge trailing tip to heel. Then 3-3 stropping strokes each side heel to tip, and 3-4 stropping strokes each side tip to heel. Deburr in champagne cork - deburring is a must.

For the rod I place the tip on the edge of my board and hold the rod horizontal, nearly parallel to the floor. I do heel-tip and tip-heel strokes to insure that I'm hitting the tip and heel of the blade evenly, as either the tip or heel is the first and last part to touch the surface.

The edge I get is very sharp - smooth with some bite. The rod alone leaves quite a bit of bite, and the strops smooth it out a lot. Deburring helps prolong the edge life.

Personally, I find this technique adequate for my needs, as the edge is really sharp and cuts well. It's not a replacement for proper sharpening on stones, but I do find that it greatly extends the time between sharpenings, thus extending the life of the knife.

tk59
12-26-2012, 06:04 PM
Without a doubt you are correct...but bringing out the stones, soaking, and putting stuff away takes way longer and the wife hates me doing it in the kitchen. When I perma-soak them in the garage in the summer though it is no problem. It's all quick then -- but summer is only so long ;)

k.Splash n go, baby! Like kaleab, the G5k for touch-ups or G1k for somewhat more damaged edges works great. Takes a couple of minutes.

mpukas
12-26-2012, 06:06 PM
A couple further thoughts… steeling primarily realigns the edge, so repeated steeling actually weaken the edge over time, since it’s just bending the metal back and forth.

My thought behind steeling and then followed by stropping and deburring is that some of that weak metal is being removed in the process, thus creating a stronger – and sharper - edge than just steeling alone.

Still, it’s not cutting significant amounts of metal to create a new edge or revel fresh steel, so it’s really just a quick fix. The more I do this, the less and less the edge lasts each time.

tk59
12-26-2012, 07:09 PM
A couple further thoughts… steeling primarily realigns the edge, so repeated steeling actually weaken the edge over time, since it’s just bending the metal back and forth.

My thought behind steeling and then followed by stropping and deburring is that some of that weak metal is being removed in the process, thus creating a stronger – and sharper - edge than just steeling alone.

Still, it’s not cutting significant amounts of metal to create a new edge or revel fresh steel, so it’s really just a quick fix. The more I do this, the less and less the edge lasts each time.
You're absolutely right. But don't make it sound all bad. Depending on the characteristics of your blade steel, it may be an advantage, so to speak. If a pro sharpens a Henckels every time it starts to feel less than super sharp, the knife will need some serious thinning in no time at all. Hell, they will need a new knife altogether in no time. On the other hand, if you steel your Heiji, you'll kill the knife even faster and you're steel rod will be shot to hell, too. I don't see anything wrong with people finding the ideal compromise for their own particular situation. It's when someone isn't taking full advantage of how thier knives were designed and made that it drives me knuts.

mpukas
12-26-2012, 08:38 PM
...On the other hand, if you steel your Heiji, you'll kill the knife even faster and you're steel rod will be shot to hell, too...

FWIW, I've done the same thing on my Heiji to see how it would work. It doesn't respond as well as the steel in the Yusuke, but still provides a sharper edge than before. Jon's probably cringing, scowling at me right now...

K-Fed
12-26-2012, 09:09 PM
I leave a strop and permasoaking beston 500 bester1.2k and rika at work. End up using it more on the other guys knives but I like having them there the odd time I do need them.

labor of love
12-26-2012, 11:24 PM
i always figured the steels in heijis and takedas were too hard for ceramic rods to be used?

NO ChoP!
12-27-2012, 12:11 AM
I would say the Mac black is good for 58-61. White ceramics, maybe 58'ish....I wouldn't touch a Takeda to a rod, imho...

tk59
12-27-2012, 12:56 AM
FWIW, I've done the same thing on my Heiji to see how it would work. It doesn't respond as well as the steel in the Yusuke, but still provides a sharper edge than before. Jon's probably cringing, scowling at me right now...What kind of steel rod did you put your Heiji to?

Dave Martell
12-27-2012, 01:11 AM
When using a rod (well the ones we're likely to use anyway) there's nearly no steel removal and that's something to consider (same with using strops). I feel the best way for edge maintenance is what works for you, if it's a rod then that's OK by me.

Personally I use a ceramic rod for my German knives and strops for my Japanese ones, when they stop working I hit the stones.

Crothcipt
12-27-2012, 05:57 AM
I also remember my first J-knife outside of globals I ended up ripping the edge off the Tanaka santoku with a diamond blade. The Tanaka is considered 65 on the hardness scale and I couldn't even scratch it with the diamond rod, to try to get a edge back.

I have since fixed the edge and would love to try it with the ruby rod, but the only think I can say it it removes steel more than I would like.

JMJones
12-28-2012, 12:10 PM
I really like using the Idahone ceramic rod and have used it for over five years. If the knife is not shaving sharp, a few light passes usually does the trick, ,however it is a game of diminishing returns, eventually you need to get back to the stones. That being said I have bought some cheap ceramic rods at kitchen stores and they are just about useless.

stevenStefano
12-31-2012, 07:30 PM
Partly because of this thread and partly because I'm lazy/it's dead busy in work at present, I have been experimenting with my Mac black ceramic rod.

My working rotation at present is a 270 Kono HD, a 270 DT ITK and a 210 Rottman suji. I believe with stropping and how much I use them in work, for the Kono and the DT I can get really 2 weeks of optimal use with stropping and after that they really need sharpened. For the Rottman, I'd say I could go a month without any hassle whatsoever. So basically for the Kono and DT I have been using my Mac rod the last while when stropping has stopped working, and the results have been pretty good. With a few very very light touches, the edge is very good. I think that stropping after the rod definitely definitely definitely prolongs the times between using the rod, it makes the edges a little smoother and they last quite a bit longer. I have been using the rod on each knife only once or twice per day, but I think I am approaching the point of diminishing returns and they'll need taken to the stones again, I think by the end of this week the rod will be doing very little

So basically I kinda agree with Chris about rods not being all bad, and I think if you're careful they don't really have any negative affects. Saying that, I'd still prefer to just use the stones again, but time is not my friend at present. It feels like I'm wiping the dirty bits off my car with my sleeve every day rather than just washing it properly

keithsaltydog
01-01-2013, 05:07 PM
Dirty sleeves can put a dent in your fashion statement:spin chair:

mpukas
01-01-2013, 08:46 PM
What kind of steel rod did you put your Heiji to?
Sorry, missed this TK... I use the MAC black rod, same as on the Yusuke KS clone

tk59
01-02-2013, 01:45 AM
...I use the MAC black rod, same as on the Yusuke KS cloneI see. That makes sense, thanks.

Stumblinman
01-02-2013, 02:54 AM
OK so what are the conclusions >? Which is the better rod ? Thanks all for their contributions to this thread but, is there a solution or just preference >? I don't have the solution cause I'm the novice on this side of the knife but I know sharp from crap. :)

tk59
01-02-2013, 12:44 PM
Conclusions: Use stones. If you don't want to do that all the time, use a rod (and/or a strop) in between stone sessions. For a coarser, more aggressive edge, use something like an Idahone (1k). For more refinement, use a MAC black rod (2k).

Jmadams13
01-02-2013, 12:52 PM
This means nothing, just in a posting mood, lol, but I was using a Idahone for a while, then dropped it and it broke. So went to stropping on a dry 1200k stone (at let i think its 1200k, its the white side of the takeda handheld) and had better and more consistent results on my CCK and a few white#2 knives, but better results on my ODC and French knives with a really really old Foster Bros. steel rod.

Dusty
01-02-2013, 05:38 PM
I use a couple of rods regularly. I have a home made borosilicate glass rod with that is only VERY slightly abrasive, that works quite well on anything less than 60-61 hrc, I generally use a couple of swipes of it before stropping. I also keep a cheap white ceramic rod from Ikea in my bag for emergencies - when I need an edge with heaps of bite, or when I need to touch up a workmates Victorinox in a hurry.

I think there's a place for them in a pro environment.

Stumblinman
01-11-2013, 04:06 AM
OK another question on rods... Is it best to use a few (3-5) swipes end down with same angle as stones or stropping motion? I'm just thinking but stropping motion on a maybe 2000 grit ceramic rod seems bout the same or better than what adams is talking about on the MAC.

bahamaroot
01-13-2013, 10:42 PM
I use the Idahone a lot and love it. And for those that didn't know it, the Idahone is rated 1200 ANSI which makes just under J3000. Three edge leading strokes as it starts to dull and my knife is back to razor sharp.

labor of love
01-13-2013, 11:17 PM
OK another question on rods... Is it best to use a few (3-5) swipes end down with same angle as stones or stropping motion? I'm just thinking but stropping motion on a maybe 2000 grit ceramic rod seems bout the same or better than what adams is talking about on the MAC.
i use the same motion to strop on a wetstone as i do on a honing rod and i have more consistent, quicker results on a wetstone, whether its 2k or 8k.

labor of love
01-13-2013, 11:23 PM
I use the Idahone a lot and love it. And for those that didn't know it, the Idahone is rated 1200 ANSI which makes just under J3000. Three edge leading strokes as it starts to dull and my knife is back to razor sharp.

dull to razor sharp in 3 strokes? on a honing rod? i seriously doubt that.

ThEoRy
01-13-2013, 11:31 PM
I use the Idahone a lot and love it. And for those that didn't know it, the Idahone is rated 1200 ANSI which makes just under J3000. Three edge leading strokes as it starts to dull and my knife is back to razor sharp.


Curious, where is this information located?

bahamaroot
01-13-2013, 11:49 PM
There is plenty more out there but this is a good start.

http://www.realfoodtoronto.com/idahone- ... od-12.html
http://www.sliceandsear.com/idahone-cer ... ng-rod-12/
http://www.paulsfinest.com/Idahone-Cera ... 0.5cm.html
http://www.foodieforums.com/vbulletin/archive/index.php?t-7368.html
http://www.cheftalk.com/t/51102/honing-sharpening-steel-recommendation

labor of love
01-13-2013, 11:57 PM
whats j3000?

bahamaroot
01-14-2013, 12:01 AM
whats j3000?
3000 grit on the Japanese scale, which is the rating that most water stones are based on. ANSI is the US scale.

As far as three strokes I was referring to a knife.

chinacats
01-14-2013, 12:13 AM
There is plenty more out there but this is a good start.

http://www.realfoodtoronto.com/idahone- ... od-12.html
http://www.sliceandsear.com/idahone-cer ... ng-rod-12/
http://www.paulsfinest.com/Idahone-Cera ... 0.5cm.html
http://www.foodieforums.com/vbulletin/archive/index.php?t-7368.html
http://www.cheftalk.com/t/51102/honing-sharpening-steel-recommendation

Only 2 of your links are active...they both state = to about j2k....in fact both are quotes by BDL as saying 2k and I'm sure he probably knows. That being said, I would just as soon strop on a stone or felt to bring back an edge. My steels (3 metal, 1 ceramic) work great with my French/German stuff, but even there I find myself stropping on a stone when needed. Personally, I think it is easier for me to get the correct angle on a stone or strop than a steel.

labor of love
01-14-2013, 12:14 AM
3000 grit on the Japanese scale, which is the rating that most water stones are based on. ANSI is the US scale.

As far as three strokes I was referring to a knife.

In any event, honing rods do not sharpen knives. Nothing can go from dull to sharp on a rod.

chinacats
01-14-2013, 12:15 AM
In any event, honing rods do not sharpen knives. Nothing can go from dull to sharp on a rod.

+1

bahamaroot
01-14-2013, 12:48 AM
Sorry,
http://www.realfoodtoronto.com/idahone-ceramic-sharpening-rod-12.html
http://www.sliceandsear.com/idahone-ceramic-sharpening-rod-12/
http://www.paulsfinest.com/Idahone-Ceramic-Sharpening-Rod-Fine-12-30.5cm.html

I know BDL said it was around 2k but if you look at conversion charts 1200ANSI is right at J3000.
Google Idahone ANSI and you will find plenty to read.
Ceramic rods remove metal, that is what those back streaks are on the rod and that is sharpening. I'm not saying it as fast as a stone but sharpening non the less.
If nothing more it is removing burrs as it straights the edge.

ThEoRy
01-14-2013, 12:59 AM
None of those links mention ANSI, I was hoping for something from the manufacturer.

Dave Martell
01-14-2013, 02:27 AM
I don't believe that there's anything anywhere stated from Idahone what grit rating their rods are rated at. I say this because I used to sell them and had to call them and ask what grit they rate them at and I was told something to the effect of close to 1200x. I assumed that they meant US standards (ANSI?) which should be about 1500x in the Japanese standard (JIS?).

My opinion is that these (white Idahone) rods are about 1200x in both USA & Japan talk but that the cut rate is sooooooo slow they work more like a fine Arkansas stone than a 1200x Japanese waterstone does. Sometimes grits ain't just grits. :)

tgraypots
01-16-2013, 10:15 AM
anyone try the ruby rod yet? if so, what's the verdict?

Crothcipt
01-16-2013, 04:55 PM
I have Tom, I really can't say as to grit. It does cut fast, almost to fast. But then again I am still a novus at this.

ThEoRy
01-16-2013, 05:24 PM
Pics or it didn't happen.

Dave Martell
01-16-2013, 08:33 PM
Where does the red ruby rod come from? Link?

ThEoRy
01-16-2013, 08:54 PM
http://www.newwestknifeworks.com/product/knife-accessories/knife-sharpeners/ruby-sharpening-steel/4012

This is all I could find, but it seems a bit smallish.

Crothcipt
01-16-2013, 09:27 PM
That is were I bought it from. It comes from a Germany company I can't remember right off the bat. I did do a search and they are online. New West is the only place in the states you can get it.

The surface seems very smooth, it has just under 8" of ruby surface (like a 1/32" short). Total in length is 14". Like I said earlier in this thread, it cuts way to much, that it will leave the start of a wire edge.

12678

As you can see were the metal has been coming off the blades. If I use it at work it's for a quick fix, and I only strop a few times.

Oh ya I did start this thread last summer wondering if any one had anything to say about them.

http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/showthread.php/8250-Mini-Light-Sabor?highlight=ruby

Vertigo
01-16-2013, 09:43 PM
anyone try the ruby rod yet? if so, what's the verdict?

http://www.souppilgrim.com/orglif/ruby.jpg

Dave Martell
01-16-2013, 09:48 PM
Thanks guys