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rahimlee54
12-27-2012, 06:11 PM
I just got the sous vide machine and I am giong to give it the first run this weekend.

There are alot of options so I thought I would ask people what their favorite dish sous vide is so I can be blown away.

Thanks
Jared

Chifunda
12-27-2012, 06:51 PM
Hard to say. Seventy two hour short ribs are amazing...tender, succulent pork chops that remind me of the old days before pork had all the fat engineered out of it...and for one out of left field: my wife is still raving about sous vide brussel sprouts.

Enjoy the journey. :)

AFKitchenknivesguy
12-27-2012, 07:18 PM
Buy a cheap cut of beef, season with salt, pepper and garlic, and set it at 128F for 36-48 hours. Slice thin and eat straight from the cutting board. It'll make you feel like a mans man.

Salty dog
12-27-2012, 07:27 PM
Flank steak. Then sear it on the grill before service.

sw2geeks
12-27-2012, 07:50 PM
Salmon is great and does not take too long.

Crothcipt
12-27-2012, 08:48 PM
I laugh when I see someone go over to the sous vid machine on Chopped.

Chifunda
12-27-2012, 10:08 PM
After some reflection, I've decided my favorite thing about sous vide is that I finally get to buy a torch. :flame:

slowtyper
12-28-2012, 12:26 AM
I laugh when I see someone go over to the sous vid machine on Chopped.

I laughed one episode I saw recently (a re-run) when the judges were like "Oh, he's using the sous-vide machine!" when actually all he was doing was using the vac.

ThEoRy
12-28-2012, 03:05 AM
To be fair I think sous vide translates to "under vacuum" so technically they aren't incorrect. On topic, pretty much most protein or vegetables can be cooked sous vide successfully. I also like to make ice cream under vacuum.

cookinstuff
12-28-2012, 03:23 AM
beef cheeks, and not sous vide, but 62.5 c eggs.

ThEoRy
12-28-2012, 03:41 AM
beef cheeks, and not sous vide, but 62.5 c eggs.
Oooh I love 63 degree eggs!!!

cookinstuff
12-28-2012, 03:45 AM
yes, egg shooters, gotta do some tomorrow, I always toss a couple extra in.

franzb69
12-28-2012, 07:12 AM
i was about to say eggs as well but then i guess a lot of people have been mentioning it already. lol.

marc4pt0
12-28-2012, 09:44 AM
Favorite of mine is sv. Spinalis Dorsi. Best tasting part of the cow. Give it 24hrs and than sear it in some plugra. Or 48hr duck leg confit. 72hr short rib it's one of our biggest sellers, as well as the 48hr pork belly. Holy crap I'm on holiday hours overload, mind can't decide... Flank is also good. Leave it whole and give it 24hrs then just "kiss" it in a hot pan with plugra on both sides to caramelize. However,I do not recommend grilling it, you'll definitely lose some of that tenderness you just worked so hard to achieve via the sous vide. Oh, and custards are a lot fun sous vide, especially if you have an ice cream machine.

bieniek
12-28-2012, 05:00 PM
King crab.

In a bag with lemon thyme, lemon zest, good olive oil, whole peppercorns, garlic clove or two and dill.
All chilled, vacumized and then 5 minutes in 58.7 C.
Chilled again, and used next day. Sear in butter until golden brown. Glaze with lemon.

El Pescador
12-28-2012, 05:13 PM
Favorite of mine is sv. Spinalis Dorsi. Best tasting part of the cow. Give it 24hrs and than sear it in some plugra. Or 48hr duck leg confit. 72hr short rib it's one of our biggest sellers, as well as the 48hr pork belly. Holy crap I'm on holiday hours overload, mind can't decide... Flank is also good. Leave it whole and give it 24hrs then just "kiss" it in a hot pan with plugra on both sides to caramelize. However,I do not recommend grilling it, you'll definitely lose some of that tenderness you just worked so hard to achieve via the sous vide. Oh, and custards are a lot fun sous vide, especially if you have an ice cream machine.

I love Rib Eye Cap too! I agree its the best part of The Cow.

eaglerock
12-28-2012, 05:28 PM
Salmon and lamp :D

snowbrother
12-28-2012, 10:55 PM
My favourite is rabbit belly and leeks. Just salt and pepper wth the belly. Then cryo the leeks with salt, peppper, thyme and a shot of olive oil. Really good stuff.

ThEoRy
12-28-2012, 11:04 PM
Forgot octopus... Some shallots, carrots, celery, extra virgin, orange zest, salt pepper and maybe coriander. After you chill and clean them, just grill them to heat up, toss with lemon juice and extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper. Perfectly tender and delicious.

Dusty
12-29-2012, 06:16 AM
Beef cheek. A light confit salt and then 75c for 16 hrs is gold.

I like using sous-vide for things in which it makes a really big difference. I wouldn't normally eat chicken breast, but 65c for an hour or so in some lemon infused olive oil for a really nice free range breast is just awesome.

Chifunda
01-01-2013, 07:29 PM
So what did you make? Inquiring minds want to know.

Namaxy
01-02-2013, 09:04 PM
I made rabbit leg confit as part of an x-mas menu - turned out great. But generally any protein. My most frequent go to's are flank steak, scallops and oil poached salmon.

rahimlee54
01-02-2013, 09:28 PM
Thanks for the great suggestions everyone.

I ended up just making alot of stuff I had on hand, I wanted to get a handle on the tech. I had a rib left from a standing rib roast, turned out ok but I didn't char it enough with the torch, a custard which tasted really pure , and rich, salmon which was nice, and from egullet an egg cooked at 75C for 15 mins that was pretty good as well. I am going to grab some flank steak for this weekend and hopefully I can run across some crab legs.

Ucmd
01-09-2013, 10:36 PM
I would love to see comments about which sous vide machine and which vacuum sealer to purhase.

bieniek
01-10-2013, 04:08 AM
The cheaper the better. If works properly.
Poly science[or circulator kind of machines] tends to work little louder than lets ay SV Supreme, cause it pumps water all the time during operation.
Biggest flaw of that system is the fact that heating element is not on the bottom, is on the side, so naturally you need help to circulate the heated water - otherwise you would have cold spots in the bucket. Thats why you need pump, which can make some noise.
I ended up with SV Magic over the Supreme. Its more versatile and I can choose the size for my bucket.

rahimlee54
01-10-2013, 08:53 AM
^ Good summary. That is why I have the polyscience, size was the main factor.

Mike9
01-13-2013, 11:28 PM
I have a whole wild goose in the freezer. I want to break it down into primal parts and sous vide it then crisp it in a skillet when done. I have a good PID and just need a16 - 20 quart slow cooker/electric roaster. There are other cuts and fish and mollusks I'd like to try like octopus.

kostantinos
01-16-2013, 04:20 AM
We do a lot of sous vide at the restaurant. between the 2 brands we use i recommend the old trusty polyscience.
we also have 2 different brands of vacuum sealers both really well made but i like the KOCH vacuum sealers for their quiet operation and certain features.

for obvious reasons i will not refer as to what brands are involved but these are conclusions on a side by side comparisons during heavy intervals in a busy high end kitchen during the past 1 year.
i would like to say though that if you want o buy a used machine to be very sure where it came from and how it was taken care for.A circulator used in a bio lab is a bio hazard simply because you do not know what types of applications it was used for some of them can erode heating element and bond with the materials during long extended sessions. It is best to avoid them for safety reasons but i could say that a great number from the restaurants that pioneered sous vide possibly started with used units or used pre owned units of unknown origins .
The other very important thing to remember is that since these units can be used with regular tap water and require regular maintenance ,de scaling and sanitation of the circulators in equal regular intervals. we do ours every 12 to 15 days or so depending of circumstances.in an absolute perfect world these units are supposed to be used with distilled water

Another thing to point out is to always make sure you are keeping vacuum sealers cleaned and sanitized and also to change oil in the pump every 500 hours of operation or so and maintain the sealers any attached wiring to those and any parts attached to the vacuum chamber as these usually tend to fail more often because of abuse .i have seen a vacuum sealer that has greatly been neglected in a previous restaurant that was not that old and the pump went on it because of that oil change neglect. It also can affect the capacity of the actual pump reaching maximum vacuum --30 mbars- meaning that the max vacuum capacity is not achieved altogether or it actually takes longer for it to be achieved .

quantumcloud509
01-16-2013, 04:30 AM
You guys and your fancy shmancy machines :)

Ucmd
01-18-2013, 10:48 PM
can some pros comment on vacuum sealer PLEASE

kostantinos
01-20-2013, 01:12 AM
KOCH and or berkel is a good choice for a vacuum sealer. You can possibly find something cheaper than 3k but depends your use.

Is this for a commercial use or serious cook/ home ?

bieniek
01-20-2013, 03:14 AM
3k? Mine costed 50 bucks.
Needs perforated bags which are pricier, but to make up for the differene in price of machines, i would have to vacuum maybe 10 000 bags ;)

rahimlee54
01-20-2013, 05:00 PM
3k? Mine costed 50 bucks.
Needs perforated bags which are pricier, but to make up for the differene in price of machines, i would have to vacuum maybe 10 000 bags ;)

You have a foodsaver or something like that I am guessing? I have been using the ziploc bags with the pump they do a surprisingly good job.

http://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Ziploc-Vacuum-Pump-Storage/dp/B001DRNESE the local big box is cheap.

RichardWilley
01-21-2013, 07:24 PM
“Quick” Onion / Habanero pickle

Ingredients

· One large red onion

· 2 habaneros seeded and finely chopped

· Juice of one grapefruit

· Juice of one lime

· 1 tablespoon cider vinegar

· 1 teaspoon coriander seed + 15 white peppercorns (crushed)

· Salt to taste (half teaspoon is about right)

Directions

· Combine all ingredients except the onions. Stir well

· Bring a pot of water to a boil

· Slice onion into even 3cm slices

· Drop onions into the boiling water and immediately empty into a strainer

· Run cold water over the onions, add the liquid ingredients, store in the fridge

· The pickle can start being consumed the next day

Salmon

Ingredients

· FRESH salmon (this is a simple recipe and very reliant on the quality of your fish)

· 2 tablespoons chili oil

· 1 tablespoon grape seed oil

Directions

· Brine the salmon for 30 minutes

· Wash well

· Place the salmon in a ziplock bag with the chili oil. Force out all the air and seal. Distribute the oil so it covers all the salmon

· Place the salmon into 113 degree water bath for 12 minutes

· Get a cast iron frying pan screaming hot. Coat with the grape seed oil (grape seed oil has a high smoke point. Other neutral tasting high smoke point oils will work equally well). What’s important here is that you want

o A lot of thermal mass (cast iron)

o At a high temperature

o With a some oil to conduct the heat

o And nothing bursting into flame

· As soon as the fish is done

o Remove the fish from the ziplock bag

o Place the fish skin side down in your frying pan

o Crisp the skin to taste

· Remove the fish from the pan

o Slice

o Top with some pickle (cause you need acid)

o Serve

apicius9
01-30-2013, 03:27 AM
Didn't want to start a new thread: Any first hand experiences with flat iron steak? Or should I just pop it on the grill?

Stefan

FaInPl
01-30-2013, 03:41 AM
any protein cooked sous vide can be amazing

Chuckles
01-30-2013, 11:27 AM
I have sous vide flatiron on my menu. I take a whole flatiron with just exterior silver skin removed and cook it at 132 for 4-5 hours. It keeps a ribbon of fat through the middle of the cut that marinates it as it cooks. The flavor and texture are really good. The only catch is the fat in the middle doesn't totally break down. It is like the fat cap on a ribeye but it is in the middle. No one seems to mind if you slice it for them. Especially if you can sell a 10oz steak for $18.

This tells all there is to know:

[URL="http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/03/how-to-sous-vide-steak.html"]

apicius9
01-30-2013, 12:48 PM
Great, thanks! As a beginner, I am still trying to figure out the times I need for different cuts. I will have to cut mine in half but that shouldn't make too much of a difference, I expect.

Stefan

stphntrjllo
02-12-2013, 09:50 PM
[ agree with ThEory I use the cryovac every day and it has many more uses than just circulated waterbath cooking its great for infusing flavor or hydrating something immediately. As for my favorite dish sous vide I enjoy poached lobster or monkfish just because too often those are over cooked at restaurants

77kath
02-12-2013, 09:54 PM
There's an app called sous vide dash that calculates times and temps. It's about $5 for iPad.

Dieter01
02-19-2013, 03:41 PM
Deep-Fried, Sous-Vide, 36-Hour, All-Belly Porchetta.
http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/12/the-food-lab-deep-fried-sous-vide-36-hour-all-belly-porchetta.html

AWESOME!

apicius9
06-07-2013, 02:26 AM
Resurrecting an old thread. Ok, I just bought 4 pounds of chuck short ribs at Costco. I was thinking about making some of it just plain, only pepper, salt, thyme and olive oil; i also have some store bought braising liquids, one teriyaki style, the other some Indian flavor profile, and I wanted to use some of that on part of the meat. Not usually a fan of store bought stuff like that, but I have it and want to use it up.

I keep reading about different temp and time combinations - any personal experiences? 48h at ??? temperature? Or longer? These are boneless pieces, probably 1/2# each. Aiming for tender but not mushy. Happy about all comments,

Stefan

Brad Gibson
06-07-2013, 01:36 PM
Is the meat you bought chuck flap or short rib?

Brad Gibson
06-07-2013, 01:38 PM
Is there any reason that you wouldn't want to braise the short ribs in the oven? I feel like the best part of short ribs is the texture from nearly charred outside to a super tender inside. I think cooking it sous vide would just be a waste

ThEoRy
06-07-2013, 05:42 PM
Is there any reason that you wouldn't want to braise the short ribs in the oven? I feel like the best part of short ribs is the texture from nearly charred outside to a super tender inside. I think cooking it sous vide would just be a waste

You can still achieve those results sous vide.

apicius9
06-07-2013, 06:54 PM
I just kept reading raving reviews about 72h short ribs all over the place and thought it's about time I try it out. Well, I just remembered that I am a scientist, so I will probably just prepare the 6 pieces in different ways and see what comes out best. :) Btw, they are boneless chuck short ribs, 6 pieces = 4.5 pounds. I am currently by myself, so it looks like I will eat a lot of beef in a few days...

Stefan

ThEoRy
06-07-2013, 07:08 PM
If it's vacuumed, pasteurized and refrigerated the shelf life is quite long.

rsacco
06-07-2013, 08:12 PM
Resurrecting an old thread. Ok, I just bought 4 pounds of chuck short ribs at Costco. I was thinking about making some of it just plain, only pepper, salt, thyme and olive oil; i also have some store bought braising liquids, one teriyaki style, the other some Indian flavor profile, and I wanted to use some of that on part of the meat. Not usually a fan of store bought stuff like that, but I have it and want to use it up.

I keep reading about different temp and time combinations - any personal experiences? 48h at ??? temperature? Or longer? These are boneless pieces, probably 1/2# each. Aiming for tender but not mushy. Happy about all comments,

Stefan
I've done so many combinations using Costco boneless short ribs, as well as bone-in short ribs. I've tested cooking over a period of 24hr, 48hr, 60hr, and 72hr at 136-141 degrees F. Each one of the tests was followed up with a crust (maillard) using a blow torch. I like the taste and texture of the boneless short ribs when cooked for 48hrs @ 136 degrees F. The boneless short ribs turned out tender at a medium rare that is juicy but retains the meaty texture without getting soggy or mushy.

I kinda got a bit OCD by running many sous vide tests using the Polyscience Chef Series, and ended up eating a lot short ribs. I spent a good portion of the winter months experimenting with Modernist Cuisine. Let me know how your ribs turn out.

apicius9
06-07-2013, 08:19 PM
Thanks, looks like I may have read some of your threads on other forums, not knowing it was you then ;) I will post results, this should be interesting :)

Stefan

Mucho Bocho
06-11-2013, 11:07 AM
Theory is correct, again. All proteins will benefit from so degree of sous vide. But just because you can doesn't me it will make the end result better. You have to be very carful with white fish. But it really shines in tough cuts of meat. I've done:

Ballottine Chicken
Fresh sausages
Bacon wrapped chicken
oily and white fish
Pig Belly and Jowls
Whole Boston Butts for BBQ
Every beef cut imaginable
Goat, lamb and frogs legs

All veggies
Custard, mayonnaise, ketchup

made pickles

Made strawberry jam


I'm just a home chef, but very passionate and have just about cooked my way through Modernist Cuisine at Home. My set up is a Vacmaster VP-112 and Polyscience supreme and a PID/Crock pot for long slow cooking.

Remember that you don't have to completely cook your products sous vide. You can use the technique to get your product safely to a higher temp that 38 degrees. This way you loose less moisture because your core temperature is might higher when you start cooking.

Example:
Take fresh sausages (in vac bag) out of the refrigerator, put into a 140 degree water bath for an hour. They will be cooked through without any shrinkage. Chill completely. You can then, brown in a pan, bake in the oven or put back in the refrigerator for another day. The nice things is that because they're already cooked, when you give them the mallard, it won't take much heat to brown them and bring them up to 130 or so.

AFKitchenknivesguy
06-12-2013, 12:25 AM
Deep-Fried, Sous-Vide, 36-Hour, All-Belly Porchetta.
http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/12/the-food-lab-deep-fried-sous-vide-36-hour-all-belly-porchetta.html

AWESOME!

Oh my...

GlassEye
06-12-2013, 01:30 AM
Deep-Fried, Sous-Vide, 36-Hour, All-Belly Porchetta.
http://www.seriouseats.com/2011/12/the-food-lab-deep-fried-sous-vide-36-hour-all-belly-porchetta.html

AWESOME!

:ubersexy:

apicius9
06-13-2013, 01:33 AM
Well, here we are. 46h at 136F. Taste was great, but it was just a touch dryer than I expected - and it seems to have lost quite a bit of juice also. The boneless pieces are thinner and smaller than the bone-in ones, so next time I would go at 133F and maybe check at 24 and 36h. Gotta start somewhere. Ate a healthy manly portion with caramelized onions and cheese ravioli (I had run out of potatoes, I may lose my German citizenship over this...).

Question about storage: Do I take them out of the bag and repack or do I leave them in the juice that has come out during cooking?

Stefan

P.S. I refuse all responsibility for my housemate's fugly plates...

160931609416095

Mucho Bocho
06-13-2013, 10:52 AM
Stephan, I've found that its critical to completely chill long-cooked meats. Also, I use 129 degrees for beef products. 140 for pork and chicken. 72hrs for short-ribs. Tender meats (filet, rib eye, strip) try 129 for 12hrs. Depends on how thick the ingredient is. Doubling the thickness quadruples the cooking time. Ex. 1” thick steak SV for 12hrs and a 2” thick steak SV 48hrs.

The think I like most about SV is that you can break up the cooking process. So I usually SV one day, then chill the product. Then when I want to cook them I take it out cold. I’ll take the product out of the bag, paper towel off any juices, heavy seasoning and hit them 4 minutes a side in a ripping cast iron pan, then put it in the oven at 350 until internal temp is 122ish. Remove and let rest for at least ten minutes covered. I like my finished temp to be 129. Also, don’t season beef unless you’re looking for a more cured texture to the mean. Season before searing.

He're a chuck roast I did

http://i1051.photobucket.com/albums/s426/dennismpintoii/chuck.jpg (http://s1051.photobucket.com/user/dennismpintoii/media/chuck.jpg.html)

apicius9
06-13-2013, 11:16 AM
Thanks, that's very helpful. I had salted and peppered the short ribs before I packed them, that may have led to them bleeding out more and being drier - definitely drier than the roast in your picture looks, maybe that is what you describe as 'cured texture'. The pieces in my picture were directly out of the bag, dried and quick-seared; the other pieces/bags were cooled down in an ice bath. I will try those over the next days - should have packed smaller portions... So much to learn, but a lot of fun to play with this :)

Stefan